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Home   Join/Renew   Certification   Member Services   Education   Research   Foundation Feb. 1, 2011
 
 
 



In this issue:

Active Voice: New Evidence on Skeletal Muscle Properties Encourages Exercise for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients
Sports Medicine Bulletin to Celebrate Black History Month with Special Series
Policy Corner: New Dietary Guidelines Emphasize Energy Balance
Join People to People and Exercise is Medicine® on a Delegation to Russia
Selling Items on eBay? Use MissionFish to Share Proceeds with the ACSM Foundation
Science & Research Update: Intestinal Bacteria May Be Responsible for Weight
Sports Medicine & Exercise Science Headlines





Active Voice: New Evidence on Skeletal Muscle Properties Encourages Exercise for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients
By Verena Matschke, M.D., MRCP    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Viewpoints presented in SMB commentaries reflect opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect positions or policies of ACSM.

Verena Matschke, M.D., MRCP is a rheumatology specialty registrar in the Oxford Deanery and is completing her Ph.D. at the School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences at the University of Bangor in Wales. Her research focuses on the properties of the tendon-muscle complex in chronic inflammatory joint diseases – in particular rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis – and the causes of muscle loss in rheumatoid arthritis. This commentary presents Dr. Matschke’s views related to the research article she and her colleagues published in the Dec. 2010 Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise®.

For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), activities of daily living often are a struggle. They experience pain and swelling of the joints, fatigue and loss of muscle strength – all of which are characteristic for this common chronic joint disease caused by autoimmune inflammation of the joint lining. Improved clinical management of this disease has been achieved by the development of powerful disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, which reduce progression of joint damage and deformity and enable many patients to maintain an active life in the community. But even patients with stable disease and minimal joint symptoms suffer limitations of physical function, often leading to work disability.
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VertiMetric - Vertical Jump Assessment System
The VertiMetric is the ideal device for measuring and recording vertical leap and leg power for fitness evaluations, athletic combines, and university research. Its portability, wireless transmission, and storage capabilities give you a quick easy-to-use hand held device with the flexibility to store and analyze your data. MORE


Sports Medicine Bulletin to Celebrate Black History Month with Special Series
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This month, ACSM will feature a special series in Sports Medicine Bulletin in observance of February as Black History Month. This series will cover a broad spectrum of issues that pertain to sports medicine and exercise science professionals, ranging from a commentary from President-Elect Barb Ainsworth, Ph.D., MPH, FACSM, to an update by NiCole R. Keith, Ph.D., FACSM, chair of ACSM’s Diversity Action Committee.

Please check back throughout the month for special content relating to Black History Month.



New approach to Fitness Assessment!

Fitmate PRO is the first desktop system for easy and accurate measurement of VO2max with automatic and adjustable Anaerobic Threshold detection.
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Policy Corner: New Dietary Guidelines Emphasize Energy Balance
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Yesterday saw the release of Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 (DGA). The new guidelines are designed to help people ages two and over adopt a healthier diet. They also stress the importance of energy balance.

The executive summary begins, “Eating and physical activity patterns that are focused on consuming fewer calories, making informed food choices, and being physically active can help people attain and maintain a healthy weight, reduce their risk of chronic disease and promote overall health.” After noting that “poor diet and physical inactivity are the most important factors contributing to an epidemic of overweight and obesity affecting men, women and children in all segments in our society,” the summary also says that “poor diet and physical inactivity are associated with major causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States.”
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Join People to People and Exercise is Medicine® on a Delegation to Russia
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Dr. Angela Smith, M.D., FACSM invites you to join her in Russia for a unique overseas cultural and professional exchange opportunity. Dr. Smith and People to People Ambassador Programs are coordinating an Exercise is Medicine Delegation, which will travel to Russia from Sept. 15-23, 2011.

The delegation of sports medicine professionals will participate in bilateral exchanges with their Russian counterparts. The initial topics of discussion are as follows: healthy lifestyle interventions and public health; sports injury prevention and treatment; epidemiology trends for physical inactivity of adults and children; and existing programs for promoting physical activity and sports.

Program details are available by calling (877) 787-2000 or by e-mailing citizens@peopletopeople.com. A direct link to the itinerary can be found online at www.peopletopeople.com/angelasmith. Please consider joining this exciting exchange!



Budget Cuts Can't Stop BioRadio
Times are tough in academic budgets which can make instrumenting your lab with new equipment difficult. CleveMed is offering budget solutions to help engage your students with innovative lab instrumentation by offering a 40% discount on all BioRadio systems through February. The BioRadio captures ECG, EMG, respiration, force, Sp02 and more: www.clevemed.com/thebioradio


Selling Items on eBay? Use MissionFish to Share Proceeds with the ACSM Foundation
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If you’re looking for a creative way to give to the ACSM Foundation this year, please consider donating through MissionFish.

MissionFish is an online service that allows eBay sellers to donate a percentage of their sale proceeds to a selected nonprofit organization. Next time you have something to sell on eBay, please consider designating a percentage of your sale for the ACSM Foundation. The ACSM Foundation provides crucial financial support to the College and awards funds to promising researchers, helping ACSM continue its legacy as a world leader in sports medicine and exercise science.



Science & Research Update: Intestinal Bacteria May Be Responsible for Weight
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New research may have identified a link between intestinal bacteria and weight control, according to the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) who announced these findings last month in their FASEB Journal. ACSM is a member organization of FASEB.

According to the study, a deficiency of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) – used by mammals to recognize resident microbes in the intestines – can cause changes in gut bacteria that resemble those of lean animals and humans. This discovery builds on previous research demonstrating a deficiency of TLR2 protects against obesity, while at the same time promoting gastrointestinal problems like excessive inflammation. Researchers say these findings could open new doors for weight control solutions, and they hope this discovery will provide means to prevent and optimize treatment of common metabolic (such as obesity and diabetes) and gastrointestinal disorders.


 


New! The KNEAD Mobilization Tool

The Knead is a multi-adaptable soft tissue mobilization tool that provides myofascial release. It can be gripped in a variety of ways and used over clothing.
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Exercise and Science Headlines



Headlines include recent stories in the media on sports medicine and exercise science topics and do not reflect ACSM statements, views or endorsements. Headlines are meant to inform members on what the public is reading and hearing about the field.


The Ripped and the Righteous
The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
It is Jack LaLanne you can thank, or curse, for all the gyms: in exurban strip malls, suburban manses, downtown hotels. The health club he opened in Oakland, Calif., in 1936 was one of their seeds and templates, an endorphin emporium that pointed the way.

With “The Jack LaLanne Show,” he also had a hand in the spread — a contagion, really — of television programs exhorting viewers to rise up from their La-Z-Boys and of infomercials hawking workout equipment. An army of spandex missionaries was unleashed.
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HealthNews Salutes: Every Body Walk! Movement
HealthNews    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
It’s free, everyone does it, and it is the perfect and easy fitness ritual for all ages and body types. Yes, walking is an everyday activity, but making it your everyday fitness activity has benefits. Whether it is a family walk, treadmill workout, lunchtime stroll, or the daily doggie duty, you can walk yourself into better health in just 30 minutes a day.

Sounds a bit like an infomercial, but walking at a moderate pace for 30-60 minutes at a time burns stored fat and builds muscle, thereby increasing metabolism and weight loss. To encourage this health benefit, Kaiser Permanente has launched Every Body Walk!, a public awareness campaign to enlighten Americans about the benefit of walking.
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C-Motion's AMASS™ 3D Motion Capture

AMASS™ is the next generation in 3D calibration and tracking software. It allows inexpensive motion capture cameras to collect accurate 3D biomechanics data and create C3D formatted files that can be analyzed in products like Visual3D™. AMASS eases the collection of data for research, clinics, sports, and industry.


Kids' Sports Strike Out on Exercise Goals
MedPage Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Youth sports haven't got enough hustle, researchers warned in a study showing that organized sports typically don't give kids their recommended daily exercise.

Only 24 percent of children ages 7 to 14 who were monitored during soccer, baseball, or softball team practice got 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise, according to James F. Sallis, PhD, of San Diego State University in San Diego, and colleagues.

The rate reached as low as 2 percent for girls on softball teams; soccer provided the most physical activity, they reported online in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.
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