This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version    Past Issues    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Advertise August 19, 2014

Home   About ACSM   Join ACSM   Meetings   Continuing Education   Get Certified   Access Public Information      



Advertisement


Advertisement


Advertisement




 

 


Advertisement



In this issue:

Active Voice: Re-thinking the Universal Assumption of the MET
ACSM Publishing Two of Top Five Sports Medicine Journals
Policy Corner: Stopgap Funding Could Stretch Through Mid-December
Submit an Abstract for April 2015 Active Transportation Conference
September is National Childhood Obesity Month
Sports Medicine & Exercise Science Headlines
 
 


Advertisement

Active Voice: Re-thinking the Universal Assumption of the MET

Viewpoints presented in SMB commentaries reflect opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect positions or policies of ACSM.

Robert McMurray, Ph.D., FACSM, is the Smith-Gunter Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Exercise and Sport Science and Nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC. His research has focused on issues relating exercise and metabolism to obesity and the development of cardiometabolic risk factors in children and adults. He received the ACSM Citation Award in 2011 in recognition for his contributions to the field.

This commentary presents Dr. McMurray's views on the topic of a research article which he and his colleagues published in the June 2014 issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise® (MSSE).


We in the exercise community tend to overlook the importance of resting metabolic rate (RMR), even though it accounts for most of the daily energy expenditure of a typical adult. RMR is relevant to public health efforts intended to thwart the growing obesity and diabetes epidemics, which target groups of older and/or overweight adults for the delivery of physical activity programs. Estimates of RMR are used frequently to infer energy costs of participation in physical activity and to estimate daily energy expenditure as applied to achieving energy balance. This typically occurs via the use of the metric, the “MET,” or metabolic equivalent.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


Advertisement
SPONSORED CONTENT


ACSM Publishing Two of Top Five Sports Medicine Journals

ACSM's journals continue to be highly rated in the annual Journal Citation Reports® issued by Thomson Reuters. The 2013 journal impact factor data was just published and, continuing the trend from previous years, ACSM has two of the top five highest-rated journals in the Sports Sciences category. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise® (MSSE®) has a 2013 impact factor of 4.459 ranking it the number 5 journal in the Sports Sciences category. Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews (ESSR) has a 2013 impact factor of 4.818 placing it in the number 3 spot in the Sport Sciences category.

To learn more about ACSM's journals, click here.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  New LC7 for Performance Testing

Monark Sports & Medical bikes are designed and built in Sweden by Monark Exercise AB with focus on testing and training in Medicine, Sports, Healthcare and Rehabilitation. Monark has over 100 years of experience in bicycle production. A tradition that has yielded know-how, experience, and a real feel for the product and quality.
 


Policy Corner: Stopgap Funding Could Stretch Through Mid-December
Briefing provided by CQ Roll Call
Lawmakers trying to forge a continuing resolution to keep federal agencies operating past Sept. 30 are contemplating a measure that could run through the end of the second week of December, according to several congressional aides.

But it's unclear, for now, how many program reauthorizations and spending anomalies could be hitching a ride on such a stopgap measure.

At the top of leaders' crowded agenda is passing a CR in the roughly two weeks Congress is scheduled to be in session in September. Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, said late last month that the House will vote on a CR that would likely extend through early December.

That timetable appears to have extended into the week of Dec. 8, according to aides. The House has not scheduled any legislative days past Dec. 12, but it could always extend a session, and aides noted that the CR talks remain fluid.

Stretching a CR toward the end of the lame-duck session would make logistical sense: Such an expiration date would allow lawmakers to get through midterm and leadership elections unscathed, while providing time for House and Senate appropriators to negotiate a potential fiscal 2015 wrap-up omnibus.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement


Submit an Abstract for April 2015 Active Transportation Conference

A new conference is coming April 13-14, 2015 called Moving Active Transportation to Higher Ground: Opportunities for Accelerating the Assessment of Health Impacts. The conference will focus on the evidence-based research related to active transportation and include discussion around key tools and metrics. The conference is being jointly sponsored and organized by ACSM and the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies of Science. To learn more or submit an abstract, click here. The deadline for abstract submissions is October 1.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
25% off for ACSM Members!

Attend the leading independent event for fitness professionals, the 2014 Club Industry Show and receive 25% off an All-Access conference pass. Use promo code ACSM14 during registration.
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the ACSM Sports Medicine Bulletin and other advertising opportunities, contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469.420.2629.
MORE


September is National Childhood Obesity Month

Our shared concern over childhood obesity is well supported by data. More than 23 million children and teenagers in the U.S. are overweight or obese, according to recent measurements. In 2010, health and medical experts declared childhood obesity an epidemic. Also, while health consequences are concerning, the financial implications of childhood obesity are staggering. Obesity requires $14 billion per year for direct health care costs in the U.S.

Can you and your organization observe National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month (September) and help spread the word? COAM is an informal advocacy movement of individuals and all types of organizations, drawing national attention to the childhood obesity epidemic that is a serious issue for U.S. youth. Across America, events and educational efforts throughout September will address the problem and offer solutions.

Thank you for considering how you can observe National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month and help all children enjoy the benefits of active, healthy lifestyles.

To access the 2014 COAM Month toolkit, click here.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


HEADLINES


Students to go Mobile with Exercise is Medicine
Penn State News
Penn State's Kinesiology Club is excited to see where its Exercise is Medicine (EiM) program will go. Literally.

Making headway

EiM is hitting the road this fall with its new Mobile Outreach & Regional Expansion initiative, a project that will take its events and health assessments to campuses and community groups across the state.

"We're trying to reach out to the Penn State community as well as the Commonwealth campuses," said Michele Duffey, director of the Kinesiology Physical Activity Program.

EiM on campus is an initiative of the American College of Sports Medicine that calls on universities and colleges to promote the health benefits of physical activity and exercise on their campuses. The first campus-wide EiM event at Penn State's University Park campus was held in November 2012.

The goal with Mobile EiM, which has been made possible by a grant from the Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence, the Thomas M. Nardozzo Community Service Endowment and the Department of Kinesiology's Faculty Endowment Fund, is to travel to various sites in and out of the community, and grant kinesiology students the opportunity to be on the "front line" and give real advice, Duffey said.

"At the end of the day we want to have broader impact ... on people engaged in their health," she said.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The Trick to Making Sports Fun for Kids? Good Coaching
The Huffington Post
As the chairman of an international nonprofit that focuses on using the power of sport to affect social change, a recent article from USA Today titled "Fun - Not Winning - Essential to Keep Kids in Sports" about children dropping out of organized sports struck a nerve.

Citing a recent study from George Washington University's Milken Institute School of Public Health, the article discussed that while many people may think it's all about winning for kids to have "fun" that actually is not the key factor for most kids. Of 81 "fun" factors surveyed, winning was well down the list, with the most commonly found influences being positive coaching, trying hard and being a good sport.

First off, the fact that kids aren't having fun playing sports raises huge red flags. Sports are a game, and especially for children, are meant to be fun. About 70 percent of kids stop playing organized sports by Middle School according to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. So by the time most children are 12 or 13 years old, they've already given up participating in sports to pursue other endeavors — most of which are not going to provide the physical activity children require at that age to be healthy.

The "fun" factor in the study that stands out most to me is positive coaching. This brings to light a major problem in youth sports today — the lack of quality coaches and mentors. At the youth level, coaches shouldn't be focused solely on winning and losing. Yes, teaching a certain level of competiveness is good for children, but coaching youth sports needs to be much more than that. Winning is great, but not at the expense of fun. Not at the young age of kids in middle school. For those that excel, they can be separated into more competitive leagues in order to not deter those that just want to play because they enjoy it.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Advertisement
Rosscraft Innovations:
Theory, Technique, Technology


Rosscraft your best source for high quality anthropometric instruments and instructions on how to assess physique status and monitor change for subjects, clients and patients. MORE
Advertisement
Modern Robotic Dynamometry... from Biodex

Robotic dynamometry has remained an integral part of rehabilitation. Biodex System 4 is not your father’s dynamometer, with technology going beyond sports medicine to the entire rehabilitative spectrum. Used by the Navy SEALS, NASA Astronauts and Olympic athletes and in more than 70 countries. Find out why. www.biodex.com/system4
To find out how to feature your company in the ACSM News Digest and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469.420.2629

More info
 



Sports Medicine Bulletin

Sports Medicine Bulletin is a membership benefit of the American College of Sports Medicine. There is no commercial involvement in the development of content or in the editorial decision-making process for this weekly e-newsletter. The appearance of advertising in Sports Medicine Bulletin does not constitute ACSM endorsement of any product, service or company or of any claims made in such advertising. ACSM does not control where the advertisements appear or any coincidental alignment with content topic.

Tom Crist, Sales Director, 972.402.7724   
Download media kit

Bianca Gibson, Executive Editor, 469.420.2611
Contribute News


This edition of the Sports Medicine Bulletin was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!

Recent issues

Aug. 12, 2014
Aug. 5, 2014
July 29, 2014
July 22, 2014






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063