This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit January 13, 2015

Home   Membership   Events   Licensure   Educators   Jobs   Resources   Foundation   Contact      

 



Has Curiosity found fossilized life on Mars?
Discovery News
Time and time again, as we carefully scrutinize the amazing high-resolution imagery flowing to Earth from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity, we see weird things etched in Martian rocks. Most of the time our brains are playing tricks on us. At other times, however, those familiar rocky features can be interpreted as processes that also occur on Earth. Now, in a paper published in the journal Astrobiology, a geobiologist has related structures photographed by Curiosity of Martian sedimentary rock with structures on Earth that are known to be created by microbial lifeforms.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


How 4-D modelling is transforming energy exploration
Forbes
The tectonic plates beneath the Earth's surface are moving at about the same pace that your fingernails grow. Whilst that might not sound like much, it adds up; in the history of the Earth, North America and Europe have drifted over 3,000 miles apart. Understanding these shifting forces is essential to mapping the world's energy reserves and predicting future exploration.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New Jurassic species of marine reptile identified from fossils in Scotland
Phys.org
A new species of marine reptile from the Jurassic era has been identified from fossils found on the Isle of Skye. The dolphin-like creatures were as long as 14 feet from snout to tail, and inhabited warm, shallow seas around Scotland some 170 million years ago, researchers say. They were near the top of the food chain at the time and preyed on fish and other reptiles.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Fossils.


  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

gtech.mst.edu
 


AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now past due
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1 in accordance with the Bylaws. Suspensions will occur on Feb. 15. Payments after Feb. 15 will be charged a $20 late fee. You are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205.

Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.

Share this article:   E-mail article




The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

Donate online.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG student scholarship applications due Feb. 15
AIPG
AIPG Student Undergraduate and Graduate Scholarship applications are due Feb. 15. For details on the undergraduate scholarship, click here. For details on the graduate scholarship, click here. If you have any questions call 303-412-6205 or email aipg@aipg.org.
Share this article:   E-mail article


Houston team completes guide to Growth Faulting and Subsidence in the Houston Area
The Institute of Environmental Technology
Growth faulting has an impact on a wide variety of related geological and hydrochemical conditions in the Houston area as well as other areas along the Gulf Coast. These conditions range from the relationship of the faulting to local subsidence and large-scale groundwater withdrawal to the occurrence of radionuclides and natural gas in the principal aquifers of the Houston area, which in turn relates to the health and safety of the general public and their perception of risk, and costly adjustments to building designs and/or repairs to foundations.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG call for abstracts — 2015 Energy Exposition
AIPG
Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists at the 2015 Energy Exposition in Billings, Montana! Present and attend the technical sessions organized and hosted by AIPG on June 24-25 with an optional field trip on Friday, June 26. The schedule is structured to allow plenty of time to browse and participate in the Energy Exposition. Registration will include "Breakfast and a Movie" both days, lunch and reduced ticket pricing for the Expo dinner on June 25. Click here for additional information on the Energy Exposition. The technical session presentations will be held at the Rimrock Arena within the MetraPark Expo Center, 308 6th Avenue N., Billings, Montana, 59101. To have your abstract considered for a presentation please submit an abstract online by March 9, 2015.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist (TPG)
AIPG
The AIPG quarterly journal, The Professional Geologist, October/November/December 2014 issue is now available online.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Request for award nominations
AIPG
Nominations for awards, accompanied by a supporting statement should be sent via mail (to AIPG, 12000 Washington Street, Thornton, Colorado 80241-3134), fax (303-253-9220) or email by Jan. 15 to the AIPG National Headquarters. National awards include the Ben H. Parker Memorial Medal, the Martin Van Couvering Memorial Award, the John T. Galey, Sr. Memorial Public Service Award, Honorary Membership and the Outstanding Achievement Award. (Click on each link to go to the award's description.) Click here for AIPG National Awards Nomination Form in pdf.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Button-up long sleeve denim AIPG shirt
AIPG
A 6.5 oz. fabric, 100 percent cotton, garment washed, generous cut, double needle stitched, tuck-in tail, button-down collar, horn tone buttons, patch pocket and adjustable cuffs with an embroidered AIPG logo is now available. Available in sizes small-3XL.


Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG T-shirts available
AIPG
White T-shirt with AIPG logo on the front and "Geologists are Gneiss, Tuff and a Little Wacke" the on back.


Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE



MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Jan. 16 Call for Abstracts due for the 5th Annual AIPG Michigan Section Technical Workshop: Site Characterization AIPG Michigan Section
Jan. 31 AIPG Kentucky Section Review and Skills for Professional Geologists Exams Announcements
Feb. 13 AIPG National Executive Committee Meeting Tucson, Arizona
March 14-21 AIPG Kentucky Section Bahamas Short Course Field Trip Announcements
April AIPG Hydraulic Fracturing Conference TBD
April 11 AIPG Georgia Section Field Trip Southern Ionics Heavy Mineral Mine
April 27-29 AIPG Energy & Shale in the Appalachian Basin Columbus, Ohio
June 24-25 2015 Energy Exposition with Technical Sessions Presented by AIPG Billings, Montana
Sept. 19-22 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section
Sept. 29-30 AIPG Georgia Section: "Innovative Environmental Assessment of Remediation Technology Kennesaw, Georgia
Sept. 9-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


INDUSTRY NEWS


Earth was a frozen snowball when animals first evolved
BBC
The ice brought Earth to a standstill. Where there were once waves lapping onto a tropical shore and warm waters teeming with life, there was just the whistling of the wind and a cold barren landscape, covered in ice as far as the eye could see. 715 million years ago the entire planet was encased in snow and ice. This frozen wasteland may have been the birthplace of complex animals.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


After 12 quakes in 2 days, scientists deploy more seismographs in Irving, Texas
KUT-FM
Twelve earthquakes shook North Texas Jan. 6 and 7 — and seismologists are intensifying their focus on all of the rumbling and rattling. Meanwhile, Southern Methodist University says it will install 22 more seismographs in the Irving area over the next few days. SMU experts, who have been studying North Texas earthquakes in recent years, stress it’s going to take time to learn more about the quakes.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


NASA has come up with a plan to send Martian rocks to Earth
Tech Times
Scientists at the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration have come up with a novel multistage plan that can send Martian rocks to Earth. NASA has been studying the surface and atmosphere of Mars for a few decades now. However, rock or soil samples have never reached Earth. Ashwin Vasavada, project head for NASA's Curiosity Rover mission, explains that the space agency is working on a plan that will see Martian rocks being sent to Earth where geologists will be able to study them in detail.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Scientists discover ancient subsurface water pockets (The Varsity)
New video shows life in the deepest ocean (EarthSky)
AIPG New Members and Applicants listing (AIPG)
Antarctic pond is 12 times as salty as the Dead Sea (Business Insider)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




NASA robot will explore deep inside volcanoes
Popular Science
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is best known for their off-world endeavors, but scientists there have developed a new robot capable of exploring some of the most inaccessible areas of our own planet. Researchers at JPL announced recently that they had begun testing VolcanoBot 1 in Hawaii, sending the little robot into inactive fissures on Kilauea — which is still an active volcano.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Warmer oceans could absorb less carbon
Environmental Research Web
The ocean currently absorbs a large fraction of the carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere. But as climate changes and ocean waters heat up, the biological carbon pump, which transports particulate organic carbon to the seafloor after it's formed by plankton absorbing dissolved carbon dioxide near the surface, could become less efficient.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Utah's dinosaur 'death trap' reveals trove of giant predators
National Geographic
A nine-ton block of sandstone that was pulled from a Utah mountain late last year holds the biggest fossil trove ever found of the giant predatory dinosaur known as Utahraptor. Covered in feathers, with a huge sickle claw on each second toe, Utahraptor looked like a pumped-up version of the Jurassic Park star Velociraptor. The fossils might help resolve a long-standing debate about whether these predators hunted in groups.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


University of Canterbury researchers use hi-tech jetboat to research Tasman Glacier
The Timaru Herald
A hi-tech remote-controlled jetboat is being used to help researchers better understand the Tasman Glacier. University of Canterbury geography researchers are using the new technology to understand the processes controlling iceberg calving — when large chunks of ice break off — and glacier retreat on the Tasman Glacier in Aoraki Mount Cook National Park.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 

AIPG eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
View media kit

Jason Zimmerman, Assistant Executive Editor, 469.420.2604   
Contribute news

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the AIPG eNews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Jan. 6, 2015
Dec. 30, 2014
Dec. 23, 2014
Dec. 16, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063