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Magnetic levitation spins up waxy 'tektites' in the lab
Physics World
Solid wax models of "splash-form tektites" — tiny pieces of natural glass that are created when asteroids or comets impact the Earth — have been created in the lab for the first time. Using magnetic levitation to produce a state of weightlessness, the team created its own wax models of tektites that come in a variety of shapes — from spheres and elongated dumbbell-like shapes to doughnut formations. Geologists have long wanted to understand exactly how and when tektites form, but until now the shapes of the tektites have been derived solely from numerical simulations. The new experimental technique shows, for the first time, that the models are indeed correct.
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Geologists solve mystery of Tibetan mountains
The University of Kansas
In the most comprehensive study of its kind, University of Kansas geologists have unraveled one of the geologic mysteries of Tibet. The research, recently published online in Nature Geoscience, shows that it is the northward movement of India, thrusting under Tibet's surface like a shovel pushing through a winter's snow, that is causing the largest and thickest mountains on Earth to stretch in the east-west direction.
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Glacial melt could change chemistry and food web in world's oceans
Alaska Dispatch News
Along with increasing sea levels, melting glaciers are putting something else into the world's oceans — a huge load of organic carbon that has the potential to change marine chemistry and ecosystems, says a newly published study. By 2050, the cumulative global load of organic carbon swept into the sea by glacial melt — the of bits of old flora and fauna and their byproducts that have been absorbed, covered or ground up by the moving ice — is expected to be 48 million metric tons according to the study.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Glaciers.


AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now past due
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1 in accordance with the Bylaws. Suspensions will occur on Feb. 15. Payments after Feb. 15 will be charged a $20 late fee. You are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205.

Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.

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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

Donate online.

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AIPG call for abstracts — Alaska 2015 National Conference
AIPG
Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists at the 2015 Annual National Conference in Anchorage, Alaska! Present and attend the technical sessions on Sept. 21-22. The technical session presentations will be held at the Hilton Anchorage Hotel, 500 West Third Avenue, in Anchorage, Alaska. Contact the hotel at 1-800-HILTONS. The room rate is $137. To have your abstract considered for a presentation please submit an abstract online by May 4.
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AIPG student scholarship applications due Feb. 15
AIPG
AIPG Student Undergraduate and Graduate Scholarship applications are due Feb. 15. For details on the undergraduate scholarship, click here. For details on the graduate scholarship, click here. If you have any questions call 303-412-6205 or email aipg@aipg.org.
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AIPG call for abstracts — 2015 Energy Exposition
AIPG
Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists at the 2015 Energy Exposition in Billings, Montana! Present and attend the technical sessions organized and hosted by AIPG on June 24-25 with an optional field trip on Friday, June 26. The schedule is structured to allow plenty of time to browse and participate in the Energy Exposition. Registration will include "Breakfast and a Movie" both days, lunch and reduced ticket pricing for the Expo dinner on June 25. Click here for additional information on the Energy Exposition. The technical session presentations will be held at the Rimrock Arena within the MetraPark Expo Center, 308 6th Avenue N., in Billings, Montana. To have your abstract considered for a presentation please submit an abstract online by March 9.
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AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG

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AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist (TPG)
AIPG
The AIPG quarterly journal, The Professional Geologist, October/November/December 2014 issue is now available online.
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AIPG Directory of Geoscience Products and Services
AIPG
AIPG is excited to announce the recent launch of the latest edition of our new online buyer's guide, the Directory of Geoscience Products and Services. This industry-specific search engine efficiently connects your company with geoscience professionals.

Please be aware that you may be contacted by our publishing partner, MultiView, during the coming weeks in order to verify the information currently displayed in your organization's listing. If you have any questions about this program, please don't hesitate to reach out. You may also contact MultiView directly at 1-800-816-6710 or by email at aipg@multiview.com.

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AIPG polar fleece vests available
AIPG
Ready for layering, this super soft fleece vest offers great warmth at a great price. It is embroidered with AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold. Available colors: black, navy, grey heather, royal, charcoal, midnight heather and red. Women's vests and other apparel are available.

     

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Jan. 31 AIPG Kentucky Section Review and Skills for Professional Geologists Exams Announcements
Feb. 13 AIPG National Executive Committee Meeting Tucson, Arizona
March 14-21 AIPG Kentucky Section Bahamas Short Course Field Trip Announcements
April 11 AIPG Georgia Section Field Trip Southern Ionics Heavy Mineral Mine
April 27-29 AIPG Energy & Shale in the Appalachian Basin Columbus, Ohio
June 24-25 2015 Energy Exposition with Technical Sessions Presented by AIPG Billings, Montana
Sept. 19-22 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section
Sept. 29-30 AIPG Georgia Section: "Innovative Environmental Assessment of Remediation Technology Kennesaw, Georgia
Sept. 9-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


INDUSTRY NEWS


Hidden magnetic messages in meteorites from early solar system uncovered
The Daily Galaxy
Geologists from the University of Cambridge uncovered hidden magnetic messages from the early solar system in meteorites measured at BESSY II. A team of scientists, led by Richard Harrison from the University of Cambridge, has captured information stored inside tiny magnetic regions in meteorite samples that captures the dying moments of the magnetic field during core solidification on a meteorite parent body, providing a sneak preview of the fate of Earth's own magnetic field as its core continues to freeze.
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Glacial geologists discover translucent tiny fish 2500 feet below the surface of Antarctica
The Westside Story
Some U.S. ocean researchers, while on a mission to understand something about the rising sea levels, encountered something they didn't expect. The scientists discovered a rare type of fish that subsisted in a place that normally does not support life. At first it was one translucent fish, and then a community, leading the scientists to conclude that the first encounter was not a chance.
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Divers discover underwater forest off Norfolk coast
BBC News
VideoBrief A submerged prehistoric forest, discovered 200 meters off the Norfolk Coast, is about 10,000 years old, according to geologists. Discovered by divers, the forest is part of a prehistoric Doggerland which once spread all the way to Germany. It was uncovered when last winter's storm surge shifted thousands of tons of sand beneath the ocean.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study: Sea level rise accelerating more than once thought (The Associated Press via The New York Times)
Incredible images show underwater volcano creating wall of ash around Tongan island (The Independent)
Shattered Mars rock could be science goldmine (Discovery News)
Earliest records of Earth's atmosphere found in ancient rocks, shows persistence down billions of years (International Business Times)
42 mastodon bones found in Michigan backyard (UPI)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


World's biggest surface landslide floated like a hovercraft
Live Science
Imagine a landslide as big as Rhode Island speeding toward you as fast as an Indianapolis 500 sprint car. Just how can a mountain move so fast? The massive Heart Mountain landslide in Wyoming raced to its final resting place on a cushion of carbon dioxide gas, similar to a hovercraft gliding on air, a new study suggests.
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University of Hawaii researchers discover fresh water supply on Big Island
Ka Leo O Hawai'i
VideoBrief University of Hawaii at Mānoa and Hilo researchers of the Humu'ula Saddle Hydrologic Study Project discovered a fresh water supply on the Big Island after drilling began seven months ago between the mountains of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea. According to a release, "Geologists have long thought that only a small fraction of rainwater is stored in the islands because the geological makeup of Hawaii is volcanic and porous." However, the supply of fresh water could supplement ranchers and farmers in drought-stricken areas across the state.
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Ancient water moving up through rock could put the brake on some oilsands projects
Edmonton Journal
When he started tromping around Alberta's northeast forests, geochemist Ben Cowie was determined to figure out why there was so much salty water and heavy brine in the oilsands area. Three years later, the University of Calgary graduate (now with a Ph.D. and moved to Harvard) is causing ripples in the oilpatch with a paper recently published in an American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin. Cowie's research points to a potentially new hazard for oilsands developers.
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Monitoring lava flows on ground and in sky
West Hawaii Today
Volcanology is fundamentally an observational science. To better understand how volcanoes work, scientists must examine volcanic eruptions and their deposits. Field observations are, therefore, at the core of HVO's response to lava flow activity on Hawaii Island. Today, lava flows are mapped using space-based methods. Timely satellite data can be used to track flow progress, especially when crews are not able to get to the field. When scientists are able to observe the flow directly, they map the flow boundaries using the Global Positioning System.
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