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Australian geologists uncover largest asteroid crater on Earth
Sputnik News
Geologists from the Australian National University discovered what they believe is the largest impact zone left by a meteorite that crashed into the Earth millions of years ago. The crater itself has disappeared but they found the scars of the impact while drilling deep into the planet's crust.
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Study finds some fish can live in low-oxygen dead zones
The Associated Press via Yahoo News
Scientists say they have found that some fish can survive in low-oxygen dead zones that are expanding in deep waters off the West Coast as the climate changes. While the overall number and kinds of fish in those zones are declining, some species appear able to ride it out, according to a study published this month in the journal Fisheries Oceanography.
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Prehistoric lobster was the size of man
International Business Times
A team from Yale University, studying a fossil found in southeastern Morocco discovered that this fossil was of a creature that belonged to the family of anomalocaridids — the ancestors of scorpions, horseshoe crabs, scorpions, spiders, lobsters, butterflies, ants and beetles. A university press release also revealed that the study intrigued the paleontologists, as an analysis of the fossil showed that this prehistoric creature was about seven feet, which is almost the size of whales. Researchers named this extinct giant species, Aegirocassis benmoulae.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 National Award recipients
AIPG
Ben H. Parker Memorial Medal — David M. Abbott, CPG-04570, Denver, Colorado
Martin Van Couvering Memorial Award — James A. Jacobs, CPG-07760, Mill Valley, California
Award of Honorary Membership — Dennis Pennington, CPG-04401, Maple Glen, Pennsylvania
Outstanding Achievement Award — Karl Karlstrom and Laura Crossey, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Awards will be presented at the AIPG National Annual Meeting in Anchorage, Alaska, on Sept. 21, at the Hilton Anchorage Hotel. For award descriptions, past recipients and nomination information, follow the "Read More" link.

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AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award — Submittal deadline is June 30
AIPG
The purpose of the AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award is to recognize the most outstanding student chapter for their participation in, and contribution to, the American Institute of Professional Geologists. The award will consist of a plaque to be presented to the student chapter, a certificate to each of the officers of the chapter at the time of their submittal, a $500 award for the chapter and a trip for one member of the winning student chapter to the annual AIPG conference and executive meetings. The student that attends the annual meeting will observe the organization and functions of AIPG and participate in the executive board meeting.
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AIPG Section Leadership Award — Submittal deadline is May 31
AIPG
The AIPG Section Leadership Award was established by the Executive Committee in 2013 to recognize one or more of our members who have demonstrated a long-term commitment and have been long-term contributors to AIPG at the section level. AIPG has many sections where one or more individuals have demonstrated exceptional leadership for their section and in many instances kept the section together and moving forward. These individuals are commonly not known at the National level or by AIPG members outside of their sections, however, their contributions have been vital to their sections and they perform this work because of their commitment to our profession and AIPG. The award will consist of a plaque (or similar) that will be presented to the awardees at the banquet of the annual meeting of AIPG.
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What types of positions are master's students pursuing?
American Geosciences Institute
The Geoscience Career Master's Preparation Survey (Geo Career MaPS), funded by the National Science Foundation, investigated which types of positions Master's candidates were most likely to pursue. The survey, developed by AGI and AAG, asked faculty which types of positions their advisees have most often accepted post graduation, and asked enrolled students which positions they were interested in pursuing. In addition, these data are compared to what positions non-academic professionals currently hold. The data for this Currents are reported from Geology and Geography departments whose Master's programs are not intended to prepare students to pursue a Ph.D.

Follow the "Read More" link to view the latest Geoscience Currents online.

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EARTH Magazine
AIPG
The American Geosciences Institute is happy to offer a free 90-day (three issues) trial for the digital versions of EARTH Magazine. AGI has published EARTH since 1956 (as Geotimes through 2008) and now we invite you to check us out with no obligation. After 90 days, if you wish to subscribe it is $20 annually. Go to www.earthmagazine.org/trial to get started.
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AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist
AIPG
The AIPG quarterly journal, The Professional Geologist, January/February/March 2015 — Student themed issue is now available online. We now have a new digital e-pub available. Let us know what you think and if you have any comments or suggests. Email us at aipg@aipg.org.
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AIPG Section Newsletters
AIPG
  • The AIPG Colorado Section Newsletter — March 2015 is now online.
  • The AIPG Minnesota Section Newsletter — February 2015 is now online.
  • The AIPG Georgia Section Newsletter — February/March 2015 is now online.
  • The AIPG Ohio Section Newsletter — February 2015 is now online.
  • The AIPG Georgia Section Newsletter — February 2015 is now online.
  • The AIPG California Section Newsletter — February 2015 is now online.

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    AIPG call for abstracts — Alaska 2015 National Conference
    AIPG
    Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists at the 2015 Annual National Conference in Anchorage, Alaska! Present and attend the technical sessions on Sept. 21-22. The technical session presentations will be held at the Hilton Anchorage Hotel, 500 West Third Avenue, in Anchorage, Alaska. Contact the hotel at 1-800-HILTONS. The room rate is $137. To have your abstract considered for a presentation please submit an abstract online by May 4.
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    AIPG call for abstracts — 2015 Energy Exposition
    AIPG
    Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists at the 2015 Energy Exposition in Billings, Montana! Register online or fill out the registration form. Present and attend the technical sessions organized and hosted by AIPG on June 24th-25th with an optional field trip: Transect Across the Beartooth Mountains Front Laramide Triangle Zone: Dean, Montana to The Golf Course. Trip leader: Ennis Geraghty, Senior Project Geologist, Stillwater Mining Company on Friday, June 26. The schedule is structured to allow plenty of time to browse and participate in the Energy Exposition. Registration will include "Breakfast and a Movie" both days, lunch and reduced ticket pricing for the Expo dinner on June 25. Click here for additional information on the Energy Exposition. The technical session presentations will be held at the Rimrock Arena within the MetraPark Expo Center, 308 6th Avenue N., Billings, Montana. To have your abstract considered for a presentation please submit an abstract online by March 30.
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    AIPG expandable briefcase
    AIPG
    The AIPG Expandable Briefcase has the AIPG logo, durable 600 denier polyester fabric and a large, padded main compartment with a laptop sleeve. It contains an organizational panel under the flap with a front slip pocket, a large zippered pocket in the front flap, detachable, adjustable, padded shoulder strap and a dual buckle closure on the front. Available in black, chili red, forest green, navy and twilight blue.


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    AIPG pen and pencil gift set
    AIPG
    Custom engraved pen and pencil. Mechanical pencil for precision writing. Hi-gloss finish and stylish, silver accents. Patented lathe lines around each barrel.
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    MARK YOUR CALENDAR

    Date Event More Information
    April 11 AIPG Georgia Section Field Trip Southern Ionics Heavy Mineral Mine
    April 27-29 AIPG Energy & Shale in the Appalachian Basin Columbus, Ohio
    May 15-16 AIPG National Executive Committee Meeting Thornton, Colorado
    June 16-17 5th Annual AIPG Michigan Section Technical Workshop — Site Characterization Roscommon County, Michigan
    June 24-25 2015 Energy Exposition with Technical Sessions Presented by AIPG Billings, Montana
    Sept. 19-22 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section
    Sept. 29-30 AIPG Georgia Section: "Innovative Environmental Assessment of Remediation Technology Kennesaw, Georgia
    Sept. 9-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


    INDUSTRY NEWS


    Ancient whalebone tells when East Africa began to rise
    New Historian
    A whalebone fossil discovered in the 1960s in Kenya has just yielded its secret: it dates back to 17 million years ago. This proves that the uplift of the East Africa plateau began no earlier than then, given that the bone was found 740 kilometers from the shores of Kenya and 640 meters above sea level. The information is of crucial importance for geologists, because up until now a rift valley that had formed after the uplift prevented them from putting even an approximate date on the start of the process that saw East Africa rise above sea level.
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    Geologist: Big quake may be in store for Oklahoma
    Times Record
    The frequent small earthquakes occurring in Oklahoma follow a pattern that may culminate in a large earthquake, said Chris Hartnady, research and technical director at Umvoto, an Earth sciences consulting firm in South Africa. Hartnady was among the geologists who traveled to Stillwater, Oklahoma, for the Geological Society of America's South-Central Section recent meeting. Hartnady's presentation, "Recent Triggered (Hydro) Seismicity in Oklahoma: a Cautionary Tale?" analyzed recent earthquakes in Oklahoma and found cycles of "accelerated seismic release."
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    NASA surprised by Chelyabinsk Russian meteor fragments
    Forbes
    More than two years after an estimated 20-meter class meteor fragmented high over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk, new data reported by NASA researchers reveals that — over a four billion year timeframe — the meteor's orbital parent body itself had likely been geologically-impacted as many as a dozen times.
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    Australia's Northern Territory shale gas potential more than hot air
    ABC Rural
    The Australian Northern Territory's shale oil and gas potential has geologists excited. The shale industry is in its infancy in the Territory, with only a handful of gas wells drilled so far; however, a reserve known as the Beetaloo Sub-basin, within the McArthur Basin, has encouraged further exploration.
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    Extent of moon's giant volcanic eruption is revealed
    R&D Magazine
    Scientists have produced a new map of the moon's most unusual volcano showing that its explosive eruption spread debris over an area much greater than previously thought. By mapping the radioactive element thorium, which spewed out during the eruption, the team of astronomers and geologists discovered that, with the help of the moon's low gravity, debris from the unnamed volcano was able to cover an area the size of Scotland, or around 70,000 km2.
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    Deep-sea robot, caught in underwater avalanche, yields new scientific insights
    Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute via Phys.org
    VideoBrief Exploring the deep sea, and especially submarine canyons, is a risky business. The floors of many submarine canyons are periodically scoured by fast-moving underwater avalanches known as "turbidity currents." In 2013, one of MBARI's remotely operated vehicles was literally swept away by a turbidity current. Fortunately, the vehicle survived, giving researchers their first close-up view of one of these enigmatic events. The resulting video and data suggest that conceptual models and even textbook descriptions of turbidity currents may need to be revised.
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    Rockies-initiated research network gets global recognition
    Pique
    An international network for scientists conducting water-related studies in alpine environments around the world, which has its origins in the Canadian Rockies, was recently accepted by the Global Energy and Water Exchanges Hydroclimate Panel. This endorsement, said Dr. John Pomeroy, the Canmore-based Canada Research Chair in Water Resources and Climate Change and director of the University of Saskatchewan's Center for Hydrology, means that the International Network for Alpine Research Catchment Hydrology is globally significant.
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