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Scientists: Stronger eruptions at 2 Alaska volcanoes
CNN
Two Alaskan volcanoes that began minor eruptions weeks ago are showing their strongest seismic activity yet, emitting small amounts of lava and ash along with smoke plumes, the Alaska Volcano Observatory said. The observatory warned of more vigorous activity with the Pavlof and Veniaminof volcanoes, both on the Alaskan Peninsula — though that will likely just mean more ash.
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Upwellings in Earth's mantle have remained stable over geologic time
redOrbit
A new study from the University of Hawaii reveals that the large-scale upwelling within Earth's mantle mostly occur in only two locations: beneath Africa and the Central Pacific. Researchers found that, despite dramatic reconfigurations of tectonic plate motions and continental locations on the Earth's surface, the upwelling locations have remained remarkably stable over geologic time.
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Britain holds biggest shale basin in the world
Canada Free Press
The British Geological Survey (BGS) report estimates that there could be 1,300 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of shale gas trapped in the Bowland shale basin alone. In fact, the BGS's upper estimate is almost twice that figure — 2,281 tcf. This would make it by far the biggest shale basin in the world.
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AIPG NEWS


Screening of the feature length documentary on global energy 'SWITCH'
AIPG
The AIPG Annual Meeting will be screening the movie “SWITCH” by Dr. Scott Tinker, CPG-10564, from 4:45-6:15 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 25, and it is free to registrants. What does the future of energy really hold? Join energy visionary Dr. Scott Tinker on a spectacular global adventure to find out. Tinker explores the world's leading energy sites, from coal to solar, oil to biofuels, many highly restricted and never before seen on film. He gets straight answers from the people driving energy today, international leaders of government, industry and academia. In the end, he cuts through the confusion to discover a path to our future that is surprising and remarkably pragmatic. Switch is the first truly balanced energy film, embraced and supported by people all along the energy spectrum — fossil and renewable, academic and environmental.
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AIPG CPD Program online
AIPG
The AIPG CPD Program, for keeping track of your continued education and professional development activities, is available online.

AIPG members, click here to open your record or to create a record to track your continuing education and professional development activities.

Your login is your email. Your password is your AIPG number (example: CPG-0000 or MEM-0000).

If you do not have an account set up for the AIPG CPD Program, contact the office (at 303-412-6205 or aipg@aipg.org).

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AIPG Section Newsletters
AIPG
The AIPG Michigan Section Newsletter — June 2013 is now available online.

The AIPG Arizona Section Newsletter — June 2013 is now available online.

The AIPG California Section Newsletter — Spring 2013 is now available online.

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AIPG new screen printed T-shirts
AIPG
AIPG has three new screen print T-shirts available with fun sayings on the back. They are $23 each including shipping (available only in white in sizes S-XXL). Order online or call the office at 303-412-6205.

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Come join us for the AIPG 50th Annual Meeting
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists' 50th Annual Meeting, "Geology Serving Society: Energy Independence, Mineral and Water Resources, and Geologic Education," will be Oct. 23-26 in Broomfield, Colo. This conference is designed to exploit Colorado's unique geologic setting. Ten field trips have been organized — with of one them venturing underground — plus several guest trips and a short course. Register now.
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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to:
  • Make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences
  • Prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety
  • Make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids
  • Support development of education programs for the science and engineering community
  • Support geoscience internships in the nation’s capital
  • Support geological filed trips for K-12
  • Support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.
For further information or if you have questions about donating to the Foundation, contact John Bognar, Chairman, The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists at 314-660-9968 or John.bognar@geosciencesolutions.net.

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AIPG silent auction
AIPG
A silent auction to benefit the AIPG Foundation will be held in conjunction with the 2013 Annual Meeting in Broomfield, Colo. Please donate any interesting books, specimens, geological memorabilia, etc. to this auction. Donors will be able to deduct the value of the items they donate and purchasers will be able to deduct their purchases because the AIPG Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Click here for more details or contact the office at 303-412-6205 or aipg@aipg.org.
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Researchers call for rethinking efforts to prevent interplanetary contamination
Space Daily
Two university researchers say environmental restrictions have become unnecessarily restrictive and expensive-on Mars. Astrobiologists at Washington State University say the NASA Office of Planetary Protection's "detailed and expensive" efforts to keep Earth microorganisms off Mars are making missions to search for life on the red planet "unviable."

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Global cooling as significant as global warming
Research & Development
A "cold snap" 116 million years ago triggered a similar marine ecosystem crisis to the ones witnessed in the past as a result of global warming, according to research. The study confirms the link between global cooling and a crash in the marine ecosystem during the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse period. It also quantifies, for the first time, the amplitude and duration of the temperature change.

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Geologic conundrums
Science Codex
These 10 new Geology articles confront geologic conundrums and capture evidence toward answering even the most difficult questions on topics such as strain localization; atmospheric CO2; ultra-high pressure metamorphism; retreating trenches; microbial diversity beneath glaciers and ice-sheets; salt-marsh ecosystems; and tracking the impact of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


San Jacinto Mountains showcase extraordinary geology
The Desert Sun via USA Today
The most impressive natural feature in the Coachella Valley is the northeast face of San Jacinto Peak. In slightly less than seven horizontal miles the peak rises from 800 to 10,834 feet above sea level, creating the steepest escarpment in the continental U.S. No other mountain in the lower 48 states rises so high so fast, not even the Sierra Nevada or Grand Tetons.
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How earthquakes heal themselves — and why that's important
TIME
On May 12, 2008, a powerful 7.9-magnitude earthquake struck the Wenchuan county of Sichuan province in south-central China. It was the most powerful quake to hit China in at least 50 years. A study in the latest Science has relied on the Wenchuan quake to add a small but possibly important clue to the mystery of why and how earthquakes happen.
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Scientists use X-rays to connect mantle chemistry with carbon cycle
Phys.org
Geologists Elizabeth Cottrell, from the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, and Katherine Kelley, from the University of Rhode Island, analyze mid-ocean ridge basalt glass to better understand Earth's deep interior and ancient past. Their work hints at a connection between the mantle's geochemistry and the carbon reservoirs stored for billions of years in the depths of our planet.
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Newfoundland fossil shines light on origins of animal life
Canada.com
Newfoundland's fossil-rich southeast coast has produced another major discovery shedding light on the origins of animal life on Earth. A team of Canadian and British scientists has found a 560-million-year-old trackway — fossilized evidence of a primitive creature moving along an ancient seafloor — in rocks on the Avalon Peninsula.
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Scientists head to Banks Island in search of Arctic's warmer past
NunatsiaqOnline
They've found evidence of giant beavers, camels and tree trunks in Canada's High Arctic. Now a team of researchers, under the leadership of Canadian Museum of Nature paleobiologist Natalia Rybczynski, is heading to Banks Island this summer, just outside Nunavut's western boundary, to look for more evidence of the Arctic's warmer, boreal-type forest environment of three to five million years ago.
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Plate tectonic gemstones
Science Codex
Plate boundaries are dynamic geologic environments where conditions for gemstone formation occur, especially at convergent plate boundaries, where plates are subducted, sinking back into Earth's interior. In this paper, a team of U.S., Japanese, and Canadian geoscientists identify two gemstones — ruby and a type of jade (jadeite) — that form at two types of convergent plate boundaries, in subduction zones and where continents collide.
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