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Submerged volcanoes cast doubt on Antarctic glaciation theory
Sci-News.com
The Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), an ocean current flowing clockwise around the entire continent, insulates Antarctica from warmer ocean water to the north, helping maintain the ice sheet. For several decades, scientists have surmised that the onset of a complete ACC played a critical role in the initial glaciation of the continent about 34 million years ago. But researchers have found geologic evidence that casts doubt on this theory.
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Canada's Arctic islands yield new clues in ancient mass extinction
The Province
Canadian scientists probing two sites in the High Arctic have found fresh evidence pointing to a fiery Siberian suspect in the greatest mass extinction of all time — a planet-wide cataclysm that wiped out more than 90 percent of the Earth's species about 250 million years ago.
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Dino-killing asteroid also triggered mind-blowing submarine landslides
Ars Technica
A recent paper, published in Geology, adds another jaw-dropper to the massive destruction caused when the asteroid crashed into the Earth just off the modern-day Yucatán Peninsula. In addition to ending the reign of the dinosaurs, researchers have found that huge volumes of sediment along the entire northern slope of the Gulf of Mexico became destabilized and slid down into the ocean basin. And that's only part of the story.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG Executive Director search
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists has initiated a search for an Executive Director to succeed the current Director who will retire in 2014. AIPG is a professional geoscience society with a membership of nearly 7,000 and a dedicated staff of seven at its headquarters in Thornton, Colo.
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AIPG section newsletters
AIPG
The AIPG Colorado Section Newsletter — June 2103 is now available online.

The AIPG Michigan Section Newsletter — June 2013 is now available online.

The AIPG Arizona Section Newsletter — June 2013 is now available online.

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AIPG 50th Annual Meeting: Oct. 23-26
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists' 50th Annual Meeting, "Geology Serving Society: Energy Independence, Mineral and Water Resources, and Geologic Education," will be Oct. 23-26, in Broomfield, Colo. Presenters will offer sessions throughout the day on Oct. 24-25.
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2013 Earth & Water student presentation event
AIPG
Time to register! Only $25 for students and $50 for professionals. Professionals, come advertise your company (display tables are free), support your future employees, have a great dinner, listen to an amazing speaker and attend local field trips.

The event is open to everyone. Come for a few hours, a day or both days!

More information can be found at:
http://blogs.uww.edu/bhattacj/.

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Show your pride
AIPG
Check out the new items available from the AIPG Store: Rapid Dry Polo Sport Shirt and Sport-Tek T-shirt. The AIPG Store also has hats, jackets, vests, button-up shirts, travel mugs, decals, pen/pencil gift set and much more. Order online.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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Next Mars rover will seek out signs of past life
Scientific American
NASA officials have revealed their vision for what comes after the wildly successful Curiosity rover on Mars. Using Curiosity's design as a starting point, Mars 2020 will be another rover digging around the surface of the red planet. But, this time, the robotic explorer will be searching for signs of past life and packing up samples that, someday, will be returned to Earth for analysis.

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Prehistoric Trackways National Monument preserves the passage of life before the dinosaurs
Desert Exposure
In the Robledo Mountains, there lies a remarkable geologic chapter in the story of life on our restless planet. It now ranks as the world's most important fossil record of its kind for the geologic time span called the Permian Period of the Paleozoic Era. In recognition of the site's scientific value, Congress passed legislation in 2009 to make it a national monument: the Prehistoric Trackways National Monument.

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Loch Ness monster: Geology tries, but doesn't explain mystery
The Christian Science Monitor
In 1933, Londoner George Spicer and his wife told The Inverness Courier that they had seen something. Something strange: a dragon-like creature that quickly disappeared back into the Loch Ness lake. Since then that monster has been (allegedly) seen countless time. An Italian scientist blames the Loch Ness monster sightings on seismic activity. But that doesn't quite add up.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Lake Qinghai in China dates back almost 5 million years
Science 2.0
Lake Qinghai is the largest interior plateau lake in North China and has long been sensitive to climate change and the environmental effects of Tibetan Plateau uplift. A new study presents a high-resolution magnetostratigraphy work which provides a chronology back to about 5.1 million years ago. Analysis of lithofacies and depositional environments reveal that the change from eolian to lacustrine facies occurred about 4.63 million years ago, corresponding to a shift from an arid/semi-arid to a more humid climate, which resulted in the origin of Lake Qinghai.
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The receding threat from 'peak oil'
BBC News
Concerns about oil supplies running dry are receding, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). Massive new discoveries in the U.S. have led to a "dramatic" change in global prospects. The IEA's head of oil markets, Antoine Halff, says forecasts have had to be repeatedly revised upwards in the past two years.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Melting in the Afar helps scientists understand how oceans form (PlanetEarth Online via Phys.org)
Flooding of subterranean lake in Antarctica created Boston-sized crater (Nature World News)
Britain holds biggest shale basin in the world (Canada Free Press)
Meteoroid, not comet, explains the 1908 Tunguska fireball (Discover)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Australia like Mars? Study suggests dirt in Outback may mimic red planet's soil
The Huffington Post
The red dirt in central Australia might be a close mimic for the red surface of Mars, suggests research that sheds light on how opals formed in the land Down Under. Geologist Patrice Rey at the University of Sydney in Australia finds precious opal in the red center of Australia may have formed due to conditions much like those seen on the surface of the red planet.
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USGS flights study New Madrid seismic zone
The Daily Dunklin
The red and white Cessna making repeated low-level flights in the area should not cause concern for residents according to officials from the United State Geological Survey. The airplane, operating under contract to the USGS, is conducting a study to find clues about earthquakes along the New Madrid Seismic Zone.
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Icequakes: Melting icebergs make a startling racket
Fox News
In a world increasingly worried by man's affect on the planet, a new study by Oregon State University shows that icebergs can cause more of a racket than people. In the polar regions, the breakup, calving and grounding of icebergs can create enormous sound energy, according to scientists.
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