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USGS geologist honored for contributions to better understanding the Grand Canyon
National Parks Traveler
A research geologist for the U.S. Geological Survey has been honored by the Geological Society of America for work that helps explain how and when the Grand Canyon and the lower Colorado River took their present form. According to a USGS release, that scientific problem "has vexed geologists for more than a century. "
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Geologists solve martian meteorite-age puzzle
Farsnews
A team of geologists proved that the most common group of meteorites from Mars is almost 4 billion years younger than many scientists had believed, resolving a long-standing puzzle in Martian science and painting a much clearer picture of the red planet's evolution that can now be compared to that of habitable Earth.
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Alaska is top 10 for geoscientists
KTUU-TV
Anchorage recently landed in another national "top 10" list, with ValuePenguin.com, a consumer finance website, ranking Alaska's biggest city as number three for "Best City for Geoscientists in the Country." "The benefit of geologists is knowing where your mineral and energy resources are as well as knowing how much you have and the ability to use your resources wisely so future generations can also use them," Haley Huff, who is working on her undergraduate thesis with UAA's geology department, said.
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AIPG NEWS


Come join us for the AIPG 50th Annual Meeting
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists' 50th Annual Meeting, "Geology Serving Society: Energy Independence, Mineral and Water Resources, and Geologic Education," will be Oct. 23-26, in Broomfield, Colo. This conference is designed to exploit Colorado's unique geologic setting. Ten field trips have been organized — with of one them venturing underground — plus several guest trips and a short course. Register now.
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AIPG silent auction
AIPG
A silent auction to benefit the AIPG Foundation will be held in conjunction with the 2013 Annual Meeting in Broomfield, Colo. Please donate any interesting books, specimens, geological memorabilia, etc. to this auction. Donors will be able to deduct the value of the items they donate and purchasers will be able to deduct their purchases because the AIPG Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Click here for more details or contact the office at 303-412-6205 or aipg@aipg.org.
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AIPG Executive Director search
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists has initiated a search for an Executive Director to succeed the current Director who will retire in 2014. AIPG is a professional geoscience society with a membership of nearly 7,000 and a dedicated staff of seven at its headquarters in Thornton, Colo.
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AIPG new screen printed T-shirts
AIPG
AIPG has three new screen print T-shirts available with fun sayings on the back. They are $23 each including shipping (available only in white in sizes S-XXL). Order online or call the office at 303-412-6205.

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TRENDING ARTICLE
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Geologists use Mos Espa set in Tunisia to track shifting desert landscape
The Force.net
The dusty Tatooine city of Mos Espa may have been abandoned for several years, but Anakin Skywalker's old stomping grounds are serving a new purpose for scientists who have published a paper about the behavior of migrating sand dunes in the Tunisian desert. A group of geologists are using satellite photos of the stationary set to track the barchans' movement.

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Antarctic-bound robotic submarine making its maiden voyage at Lake Tahoe
NIU Today
Northern Illinois University's 28-foot-long, 2,200-pound robotic submarine, built for exploration beneath the ice shelf in the Antarctic, is getting its maiden voyage this week in one of the nation's deepest and most celebrated bodies of water — Lake Tahoe.

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US Geological Survey searching for rare elements to fuel cellphones
Daily Gadgetry
During America's Gold rush era, miners searched for gold, silver and copper deposits. But what was too early to know back then, is that what they considered to be worthless and tossed aside in the piles of dirt would one day be valuable for modern technology. It's now believed the piles of dirt and rock from the old miners may be vital ingredients that are resourceful minerals and labeled as rare earth elements on the periodic table.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Digging for the truth at controversial megalithic site
The Sydney Morning Herald
Since Dutch colonists discovered it in 1914, Gunung Padang has been known (though not widely) as the largest of a number of ancient megalithic sites in Indonesia. Here our prehistoric forebears, moved by the area's strikingly shaped columns of volcanic rock, built terraces into the mountaintop and arranged and stacked the stones for whatever indiscernible purpose motivated them. But geologist Danny And Hilman thinks there is much more to it under the surface. If he's right, then buried beneath the piles of ancient stone is by far the oldest pyramid on the planet.
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Gibraltar might be the beginning of the end for the Atlantic Ocean
Ars Technica
Plate tectonics has its own version of the circle of life. Outlined by geologist J. Tuzo Wilson, the Wilson Cycle describes the birth and death of the ocean basins that separate continents. Continental plates rift apart along a volcanically active boundary that will eventually become the mid-ocean ridge. New oceanic crust is continuously formed at the ridge as the plates drift farther apart, forming a growing ocean basin. At some point, however, the growth stops and the oceanic crust begins to be subducted back beneath the continental plates. This continues until the continents meet.
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Mississippi and Alabama seek Canada's help to assess 7.5-billion-barrel oil sands play
Financial Post
Mississippi and Alabama are taking a leaf out of the Canadian playbook by exploring the potential of oil sands reserves in their states. The two southern U.S. states signed a memorandum of understanding over to explore the potential of oil sands resources in The Hartselle Sandstone play that stretches from north-central Alabama to northeastern Mississippi.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Geology matters when it comes to storing carbon (Climate Central)
Big-nosed dinosaur, Nasutoceratops, discovered in Utah (Science Now via The Huffington Post)
Newly discovered flux in the Earth may solve missing-mantle mystery (MIT News via Space Daily)
Submerged volcanoes cast doubt on Antarctic glaciation theory (Sci-News.com)
Scientists study cause of earthquakes in New Madrid Seismic Zone (KFVS-TV)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Stunning 3-D rock images revealed in new lab
LiveScience via Yahoo
Geologists use a variety of techniques to analyze fossils and other features trapped inside Earth's rocky layers. The most basic technique, dating back to the 19th century, involves slicing away layers of rock, taking pictures of each layer, and then recreating the full 3-D shapes by connecting the dots between images. But this method is tedious and prone to human error. Researchers have since devised more precise methods using electronic rock grinders and digital cameras, but, until now, the technique has not been automated.
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Lowest sea level ever
Discovery News
Most people are more concerned with sea level rise these days, but there have been times when the oceans dropped to alarmingly low levels. A new study calculates that the worst of those icy, low sea periods — what was called snowball Earth — saw the oceans drop more than 1,700 feet. Nor is that number easy to come by. It turns out that a lot of tricky things come into play when you start shuffling around oceans and ice sheets.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Sea Level.


Geologist will reveal secrets of Helderbergs
The Record
When residents of the East Greenbush, N.Y., area look west, they see something that's hundreds of millions of years old. The ages-old sight in the west is the Helderbergs, which displays rocks from the Devonian period — a 35-million-year span that occurred hundreds of million years in the past.
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London lying on faulty ground
Planet Earth
The number of faults in the rocks beneath London has been substantially underestimated, according to new research. The study says there are numerous and widespread displacements along cracks in the rocks under London's feet, but these have largely been missed on geological maps.
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