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Rainwater's seismic potential runs deep
Financial Times
Rainwater can penetrate many kilometers deep into the earth — further than geologists had realized. Researchers from Southampton University, working with colleagues in New Zealand, have found evidence of fluids derived originally from rainfall below the "ductile crust," where high temperatures and pressures cause rocks to flex and flow rather than fracture in response to tectonic movements. The discovery has implications for understanding earthquakes, which may be triggered by fluids in the crust. It may also provide clues to the formation of mineral deposits.
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Geologists head to Mt. Baldy to solve dunes mystery
Indiana Public Media
VideoBrief Geologists are spending the next few weeks at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in an attempt to discover what what caused part of an Indiana sand dune to collapse and bury a 6-year-old boy last year. The boy survived after being trapped under the sand at Mt. Baldy in Michigan City for hours, but national parks officials say they still do not know what caused the dune to sink.
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Monterey proves more complex than average shale play
Oil & Gas Journal
A pending cut in the Energy Information Administration's resource estimate for the Monterey shale reflects the complexity of the play relative to other U.S. tight oil plays and the need for more research into its geology. EIA is expected to cut by 96 percent its estimate of technically recoverable resources in the massive California formation, to 600 million bbl.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now available to pay online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2015 in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to log in to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologistsq
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists will hold a silent auction at the AIPG annual meeting awards dinner and social function at 6 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 15, at the Prescott Resort and Conference Center. Winning bids will be determined at the end of the evening dinner function, at about 8:30 pm. We hope you will consider a donation to the silent auction to raise funds in support of the Foundation for AIPG programs, scholarships, internships and various initiatives. Please complete the form with information about your donations (such as mineral/rock specimens, books, antiques or historic items, artwork, jewelry, maps, stay at a vacation home and other things geologic).

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AIPG new applicants and members (April-August 2014)
AIPG
Here is a listing of AIPG new applicants and members during the period from April 1 to Aug. 7.
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The University of Kentucky is now accepting applications for the Director of the Kentucky Geological Survey and the 13th State Geologist of Kentucky.
University of Kentucky
For more information about the position and KGS, please click the "Read More" link. This webpage contains a link to the UK employment application for the position.
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2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference
AIPG
The 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference is only four weeks away. Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists and the Arizona Hydrological Society Sept. 13-16 for the 2014 Water and Rocks, the Foundations of Life National Conference in Prescott, Arizona. Contact hours will be available for attending technical sessions and technical field trips. The discounted room block rate ends soon — Aug. 22. Reserve your room for only $119.
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AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver
AIPG
The term "Social License to Operate" (SLO) was originally adopted for use by the Canadian mining industry in the late 1990s, and referred to the concept that social permission was needed for a mining company to conduct its operations, for example from local communities or indigenous people. Since then, the premise of the SLO has been extended to other geological challenges faced by society, such as fracking for oil and gas development, radioactive waste disposal, carbon capture and storage, geologic hazards, and deep-well injection of wastewater.

The lay public is frequently uninformed or misinformed about the complex scientific and technical challenges that accompany these issues. This problem is typically coupled with a general lack of knowledge about subsurface geology. The SLO seeks to alleviate this problem through a variety of public participation strategies to engage with citizens, communities, and stakeholder groups. Through this process, geoscientists can develop an understanding of public knowledge and concerns.

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AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG

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AIPG polar fleece vest available
AIPG
Ready for layering, this super soft fleece vest offers great warmth at a great price. It is embroidered with AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold. Available colors: black, navy, grey heather, royal, charcoal, midnight heather and red. Women's vests and other apparel are available.

     

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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Aug. 25-27 2014 Unconventional Resources Technology Conference, Denver URTeC
Aug. 28-Sept. 7 AWG 2014 Canadian Rockies Geology Field Trip, out of Calgary, Alberta, Canada Register here; contact Debbie Hanneman for more information
Sept. 13-16 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference Water & Rocks — the Foundations of Life, Prescott, Arizona Register online
Sept. 15 The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists Silent Auction at the AIPG annual meeting awards dinner Complete the form
Nov. 10 AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver Register Online
Dec. 15-19 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco AGU
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section



FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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Scientists develop tractor beam for water
KTUU-TV
A group of physicists at the Australian National University have created a water tractor beam, allowing them to control and manipulate objects floating in water. Simple wave generators enabled the group to control water flow patterns, which in turn allowed them to move floating objects in whichever direction they chose. Application of the discovery could affect environmental studies and oil spill recovery.

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Rain of asteroids melted surface of the early Earth
Star Tribune
When you look up at the moon’s pockmarked face, you’re actually staring at Earth’s early history. The rain of asteroids that pummeled the lunar surface hit our planet, too. But erosion and plate tectonics blotted out the evidence. In fact, no rocks anywhere in the world survived to tell the story of the first 500 million years of Earth's 4.5 billion-year existence, a tumultuous period of frequent impacts known darkly as the Hadean. Now, scientists have capitalized on the moon’s long memory to uncover Earth's own past.

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A simple mineral has geochemical power that helps spark life
KQED
A research team in Arizona has found that common zinc ore may have a key role as a catalyst in the complex chain that must have led to the start of life on Earth. Their new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science shows that the widespread mineral sphalerite acts as an unexpected catalyst with organic matter, adding a new power tool to the workshop that gave rise to life.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Research from 1960s shakes up understanding of West Coast earthquakes
University of Washington
Nearly forgotten research from decades ago questions a widely used method for estimating Pacific Northwest earthquake hazards. Sand and mud collected as part of University of Washington oceanographers' graduate work in the late 1960s is central to a scientific story that spans human and geologic timescales. A new paper may shake the research community's confidence in what the sediment record can say about past earthquakes.
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Forensic meteorologists solve crimes you've never thought about
io9
Forensic meteorology is the science of using historic weather records, atmospheric data, eyewitness accounts and reenactment simulations to determine the weather conditions at a specific time and location. A forensic meteorologists's analysis might be to corroborate or invalidate an alibi, provide context for an accident or even to determine if the conditions could have been reasonably anticipated or were a freak chance event.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Meteorology.


Geologists warn of mega quake for north Chile
Agence France-Presse via GlobalPost
North Chile is at risk of a mega earthquake after a tremor in April released only some of the tension building along a high-risk fault zone since 1877, researchers said. Two studies published in the journal Nature said the 8.1-8.2 magnitude quake that shook the city of Iquique, killing six people and forcing a million to leave their homes, may not have been the anticipated Big One.
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Snow cover on Arctic sea ice has thinned 30 to 50 percent
ScienceBlog
New research led by NASA and the University of Washington, Seattle, confirms that springtime snow on sea ice in the Arctic has thinned significantly in the last 50 years, by about a third in the Western Hemisphere and by half near Alaska. The new study tracks changes in snow depth over decades. It combines data from NASA's Bromide, Ozone and Mercury Experiment field campaign, NASA's Operation IceBridge flights and instrumented buoys and ice floes staffed by Soviet scientists from the 1950s through the 1990s.
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The big rift
Khaleej Times
The Nubian and Somali Plates in East Africa are gradually being torn apart, while also pulling away from the Arabian Plate, which lies further north. The exact cause of this rifting is still hotly debated. Some geologists think it's due to forces from other tectonic plates that are colliding elsewhere on the planet. But gravitational anomalies and high heat flow readings from inside the valley hint that the rifting may be caused by a so-called "hotspot."
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Companies begin slow shift to recycling wastewater
Midland Reporter-Telegram
For every barrel of oil pumped to the surface, more than another barrel of water from deep within the earth comes up alongside it. The water is typically pumped into disposal wells thousands of feet underground. All the while, hydraulic fracturing operations pull billions of gallons of fresh water a year from aquifers that also supply water to cities and farms. With a yearslong drought depleting water supplies across prime drilling areas in South and West Texas, pressure on oil and gas companies has been ramping up. The industry is slowly turning toward recycling its own wastewater.
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