This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit August 25, 2015

Home   Membership   Events   Licensure   Educators   Jobs   Resources   Foundation   Contact      

 



International GPS project provides details of Nepal earthquake
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
The 7.8 magnitude earthquake in Nepal last April was the first example of a large continental "mega-thrust" rupture that was captured by a GPS network that measures ground motion. The Himalayas are the most seismically active, above-water mountain range on Earth. Researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and other colleagues found the earthquake was the result of rupture on the Main Himalayan Thrust fault along an area 140 kilometers (74.5 miles) long and 20 kilometers (12.5 miles) wide, lasting 60 seconds, moving towards Kathmandu at a speed of 3.3 kilometers (2 miles) per second.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Cascadia fault chatters and pops with little quakes
The Seattle Times
Initial results from a program to monitor the Cascadia Subduction Zone in unprecedented detail show that the fault off the Northwest coast isn't as seismically quiet as it has long appeared. Seafloor seismometers deployed as part of the National Science Foundation's Cascadia Initiative detected nearly 600 small earthquakes off central Oregon during their first year of operation — quakes that didn't register on any land-based instruments.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The geology of Star Trek: From extraterrestrial minerals to alien life-forms
Forbes
As with any good science fiction, part of our fascination with Star Trek comes from the combination of real science and fantastic possibilities. When you think of science in the show, disciplines like spaceship engineering, astronomy, physics and biology probably spring to mind first. However, the show actually features a lot of geology.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


AIPG NEWS



AIPG 52nd Annual Conference: Early Bird prices extended
AIPG
Register for AIPG's 52nd Annual Conference, "Fire & Ice," Sept. 19-22, in Anchorage, Alaska. Register online or use the registration form. Reduced rates for the hotel block have been extended to Sept. 4. Room rate: $137 — AIPG15. Reserve your hotel room here or call 1-800-HILTONS. Reserve now and save! Click here for meeting details. The presentation schedule is online.

The AIPG Awards Luncheon, Sept. 18, will include the presentation of AIPG Student Chapter Award, AIPG Section Leadership Awards, AIPG Presidential Certificates of Merit and AIPG National Executive Committee Officer Recognition Awards. All registrants are welcome and encouraged to attend.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG members — 2016 membership dues
AIPG
The 2016 membership dues are available to pay online. Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1 in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2016. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on MEMBER LOGIN to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist is now available online
AIPG
The AIPG quarterly journal, The Professional Geologist, July/August/Sept. 2015, includes Career Building Workshop at UC Davis a Success; Earthquakes of Mexico-As Observed from Home Seismometer in Palmer, Texas; Career Building Workshop at UC Davis a Success; From Bone Dry to Soaking Wet-A Commentary on Recent Flooding Throughout Texas plus much more! All back issues of TPG are available online.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


List of new members and applicants
AIPG
The list of new members, applicants and upgrades from May 5-Aug. 13 is available. AIPG has more than 7,800 members:
  • Certified Professional Geologists (CPG) — 3,222;
  • CPG Non-Practicing — 409;
  • Professional Members — 950;
  • Associate Members — 51;
  • Young Professionals — 86;
  • Student Adjuncts — 3,155

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Election results for 2016 AIPG National Executive Committee Officers
AIPG
President-Elect: Adam W. Heft, CPG, Michigan
Vice President: David G. Pyles, CPG, Illinois
Secretary: Keri A. Nutter, CPG, Alaska
Editor: Jean M. Neubeck, CPG, New York

The incumbent officers are:

President: Helen V. Hickman, CPG, Florida
Past President: J. Foster Sawyer, CPG, South Dakota
Treasurer: R. Douglas Bartlett, CPG, Arizona

Advisory Board Representatives for 2016 will be elected at the AIPG Annual Meeting on Sept. 18 in Anchorage, Alaska.

Share this article:   E-mail article


AIPG executive director position announcement
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The position is to be filled as soon as a qualified candidate is vetted. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE



MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Sept. 19-22 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section
Sept. 29-30 AIPG Georgia Section: "Innovative Environmental Assessment of Remediation Technology Kennesaw, Georgia
Sept. 9-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


INDUSTRY NEWS


Ancient magma movements responsible for Gascoyne minerals
Phys.org
Geologists have used a technique developed at Curtin University to determine magmatic fluids came up from the Earth's mantle repeatedly over the past 1,600 million years, depositing minerals along a fault line in the Gascoyne region of Western Australia. Geological Survey of Western Australia researcher Dr. Simon Johnson told the Geological Survey Open Day earlier this year the fault had been active 1,600, 1,375, 1,220 and 1,000 million years ago.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Minerals.


Colorado's canyon without a river
Arizona Public Radio
Unaweep Canyon, south of Grand Junction, Colorado, is odd because it has two outlets. A pair of creeks now flows off a divide in opposite directions — East Creek goes out one way, West Creek exits the other. But neither stream is big enough to have carved a canyon as large as Unaweep. Geologists think two large rivers initially did the cutting. But what happened to those major rivers?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

gtech.mst.edu
 


New science shows Sitka geologically separate from rest of Alaska
KTOO-FM
Sitka sits on a different chunk of the Earth's crust than the rest of Alaska. Decades of scientific research have led to a report and map showing where the faults lie. The new information expands scientists' understanding of what is going on beneath Alaska's surface.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


World's oldest flower found: It's 125 million years old
ZME Science
We tend to think of flowering plants as ubiquitous, but in truth, they've only been around for about 125 million years Geologists may have just found the oldest flower. Looking through some previously discovered fossils, scientists were thrilled to find a spectacular specimen: a fossil of a flowering plant resembling that of the common pond weed Ceratophyllum, more commonly known as hornwort.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Oceanographers solve mystery of beach explosion (Phys.org)
Glacial outburst flood, debris flow in Mount Rainier National Park (The Enumclaw Courier-Herald)
How life and luck changed Earth's minerals (Wired)
Number of unemployed geoscientists reaches highest level since 2009 (ABC News)
Exploration geologists: '[Properties] are available that you don't see for 10 years — and there's no competition' (Sprott's Thoughts)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Shell clears final hurdle for Arctic drilling
Discovery News
Oil giant Shell has been given final permission for an exploratory drilling project in Alaskan waters. The drilling, already underway with a temporary permit, is the first of its kind since Shell's 2012 Arctic drilling project was plagued by problems.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Experts say ground in Tampa Bay could be more susceptible to sinkholes
Tampa Bay Times
The onslaught of rain that drenched the Tampa Bay area in the past month unleashed widespread flooding that left the ground soppy and saturated. Geologists say that under all that water weight, another problem could be brewing out of sight: sinkholes.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Professors at Appalachian State receive NSF grant to study dome formation in Georgia and Western North Carolina
Appalachian State University
The Tallulah Gorge area in Georgia and Toxaway Falls in Gorges State Park in Western North Carolina are well known for their beauty and outdoor recreational offerings. For Appalachian State University geologists Gabe Casale and Jamie Levine, the areas are also rich in geological information.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

AIPG eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
View media kit

Jason Zimmerman, Assistant Executive Editor, 469.420.2604   
Contribute news

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the AIPG eNews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Aug. 18, 2015
Aug. 11, 2015
Aug. 4, 2015
July 28, 2015



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063