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Geologists help NASA plan for human exploration of Mars
Phys.org
NASA is assembling scientists from across the country in Houston to start thinking about locations on Mars that would be good candidates for human exploration. Among those gathering for the Landing Sites/Exploration Zones Workshop for Human Missions to the Surface of Mars, is a Brown geologist who has first-hand experience in planning missions to explore another world.
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Geologists investigate 'slow-moving landslide' developing in Wyoming's Bighorn Mountains
Reuters via Raw Story
A massive fissure that has mysteriously appeared on the flanks of the Bighorn Mountains in Wyoming is a slow-moving landslide possibly triggered by excessive precipitation combined with moisture from a nearby spring, a state geologist said on Oct. 30. The mass geologic movement in the remote area where no people or property are directly at risk came to light when commercial hunters in Wyoming discovered it and posted photographs and commentary on their firm's Facebook page, sparking a flurry of online interest.
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9 rules for exploration success from the world's best mine finder
Mining.com
Simply put, you just have to be out of the office, in the field and drilling holes if you want to be making discoveries according to legendary explorer and geologist, Dave Lowell. This past century's most successful mining explorer, Lowell — who has discovered an unprecedented seventeen ore bodies including, the world's largest copper mine — distilled his years of wisdom into nine rules on making discoveries.
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AIPG members — 2016 membership dues
AIPG
The 2016 membership dues are available to pay online. Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1 in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2016. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on MEMBER LOGIN to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
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AIPG 2015 Alaska National Conference photos
AIPG
Everyone had a wonderful time at the AIPG 2015 Alaska National Conference, and we have photos for everyone to view. Enjoy!
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AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG
  • The AIPG Michigan Section Newsletter — October 2015
  • The AIPG Georgia Section Newsletter — November 2015

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    AIPG New England Aquifers: Elusive and Complex Conference — Earn 4 Contact Hours or .4 CEU's; Earn 2 LSP Technical Credits
    AIPG
    This is a half-day workshop was developed to provide water utility personnel, engineers, hydrogeologists, regulatory officials and other interested persons in understanding about the sand and gravel and bedrock aquifers their wells are located in and how and why well performance declines over time along with options that are available to rehabilitate your well. The workshop begins with an introduction of the geology and aquifers of New England. From plate tectonics to glacial geology along the effects of weathering that have created the majority of high-yield aquifers located throughout New England. A quick trip through well types, water well terminology, groundwater flow into well screens and a discussion of specific capacity as it applies to sand and gravel and bedrock aquifers. Specific capacity is easy to calculate and use as a measure of the performance of your well, but something that is often overlooked. Moving forward, there is a segment on declining well performance including a discussion of the chemical, physical, and microbiological factors that are the cause for drop in performance in wells. Improving the performance of your well will be discussed by examining physical and chemical methods to rehabilitate your well and improve specific capacity. Understanding the permitting considerations along with the costs of well rehabilitation services will be discussed. The final segment of the workshop will be case studies on well rehabilitation. This will tie together all of the other segments of the workshop.
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      No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
    ME | PhD | Certificate

    Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

    gtech.mst.edu
     


    AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist (TPG)
    AIPG
    The AIPG quarterly journal, The Professional Geologist, Oct./Nov./Dec. 2015 — new digital version or pdf — includes AIPG Annual Meeting Photos; AGI/AIPG Summer Interns become "Policy Wonks"; Low-Energy Alternatives for Removing Contaminant; Plumes in Groundwater; General Stratigraphy of the Usibelli Coal Mine, Healy, Alaska; The Central Alaska-Nenana Coal Province; Connections and Networking in Unusual Places: Awareness of Sewer Air and Vapor intrusion; A Unique Metal with a History in Colorado; plus much more! All back issues of TPG are available online.
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    AIPG executive director position announcement
    AIPG
    The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The position is to be filled as soon as a qualified candidate is vetted. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
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    MARK YOUR CALENDAR

    Date Event More Information
    Nov. 1-4 GSA Annual Meeting Baltimore
    Nov. 7 AIPG Arizona Section Fall Field Trip Holbrook, Arizona Area
    Nov. 17-19 22nd International Petroleum Environmental Conference (IPEC) Denver
    Dec. 4 AGWT — Colorado Groundwater Issues Denver
    Dec. 9 AIPG New England Aquifers: Elusive and Complex Conference Marlborough, Massachusetts
    Dec. 16 AIPG New England Aquifers: Elusive and Complex Conference Glastonbury, Connecticut
    March 21-24, 2016 118th National Western Mining Conference & Expo Denver
    April 5-6, 2016 AIPG Water Resources Unplugged Conference Orlando, Florida
    Sept. 10-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


    FROM THE AIPG ONLINE STORE


    AIPG men's cotton long-sleeve T-shirts available
    AIPG
    Hanes® men's Beefy-T® long sleeve T-shirt is crafted from 6.1 oz., 100 percent ring-spun cotton for a soft hand with excellent durability. Comes with embroidered AIPG lettering with pick and gavel.



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    AIPG polar fleece vests available
    AIPG
    Ready for layering, this super soft fleece vest offers great warmth at a great price. It is embroidered with AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold. Available colors: black, navy, grey heather, royal, charcoal, midnight heather and red. Women's vests and other apparel are available.

         

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    AIPG Stainless Steel Travel Mug
    AIPG
    Stainless Steel Travel Mug — 18 oz., with blue color grip and slider spill-proof lid mechanism.

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    INDUSTRY NEWS


    Ancient sub-surface cracks may point to mineral deposits
    Science Network Western Australia
    China's stated intention to restrict vanadium exports may stimulate greater Australian efforts to mine it, so it comes as good timing that geologists are finding prospective areas for vanadium and titanium in the Kimberley. The work is part of Geological Survey of Western Australia-funded research which is adding to knowledge of the poorly-understood Kimberley Craton, a former tectonic plate now welded to the North Australia and Pilbara Cratons.
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    One for the history books: Capturing the Helen Lake stromatolites
    SPAR Point Group
    A retired geologist was trekking around Banff when some hikers pointed him to some "cool" looking rocks. Upon closer inspection, he found them to be a fossil outcropping. But these weren't just any fossils — they were stromatolites. The stromatolites may not look like much, but they're among the Earth's oldest fossils, and this means that they have tremendous value.
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    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Avalanche.


    Mars is destroying its moon Phobos
    Geek
    Mars has two moons, but they're both quite small and unusual. Phobos is the larger of the two, and it orbits close to the planet. Even though Mars has less mass than the Earth, a new analysis of Phobos' geology says that the moon is in the process of being ripped to shreds by Mars' gravity. It might not happen tomorrow, but the evidence points to a violent end for this moon.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        USGS questions study's alarming Los Angeles earthquake prediction (UPI)
    Satellite images reveal a massive 60 million-ton avalanche in Canada (Gizmodo)
    See 70,000 cubic feet of Swiss Alps rock plummet 1,000 feet into a valley (BGR)
    The most destructive wave in earth's known history (City Lab)
    New 'geospeedometer' confirms super-eruptions have short fuses (Phys.org)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




    Zircon crystal study could affect understanding of when life began on Earth
    ABC News
    Extremely durable crystals called zircons cannot be used to date meteorite impacts, a Curtin University study has found, with possible implications for understanding when life started on Earth. The findings relate to zircon crystals brought back by the Apollo moon missions more than 40 years ago. The study addressed how well meteorite impacts could be dated by looking at the damage done to zircons blasted by the massive shockwave at the time.
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    How to melt an ice cave
    Science News
    If you want to keep an ice cave cold, don't shut the door. That's the lesson learned from studying China’s largest year-round ice cave. The 3-million-year old Ningwu ice cave in China's Shanxi province contains a single entrance connected to the top of a bowling-pin-shaped chamber. Geologists Shaohua Yang and Yaolin Shi of the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing digitally re-created the 85-meter-deep formation and found that buoyant, warm outside air doesn't flow very deep into the cave.
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    Venus considered for clues on early Earth geology
    Phys.org
    Imagine thousands of huge asteroids raining down on ancient Earth, smashing craters as big as metropolitan Perth and a few much larger rocks which gouged holes as big as Australia into the planet. These impacts of epic proportions during the Late Heavy Bombardment period (4.1 to 3.8 billion years ago) caused major changes to the planet's geology and supposedly kicked off the formation of continents more than 2.5 billion years ago, according to UWA Gledden Visiting Fellow Professor Vicki Hansen. Her assertions are based on her decades-long research of Earth's sister planet, Venus.
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    Oil and gas advisory board chooses not to endorse new rules
    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
    An advisory board to the Department of Environmental Protection put off any decision to endorse the final draft of a comprehensive and controversial revision to Pennsylvania's oil and gas well rules on Oct. 27, with members saying they need to consider more feedback on the proposed changes that have been in the works for nearly five years. The resolution to wait by the Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board will not affect the progress of the proposed rules, which will still be sent to the state's Environmental Quality Board for a vote early next year on whether to adopt or modify the new requirements.
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