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Guadalupe Mountains get special geological designation
Carlsbad Current Argus
Guadalupe Mountains National Park has long attracted hikers for its rugged terrain, sightseers for its panoramic views, and geologists for its unique surface features. Now the land is a scientific mecca for those wishing to study the Earth's geological timeline. The International Commission on Stratigraphy recently designated the 86,416-acre park as having the world's best example of middle Permian Period geology.
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New study identifies inaccuracies, more precisely locates San Andreas Fault trace
redOrbit
Just to the south of San Francisco, in San Mateo County, is the quaint town of Portola Valley, known for their early embrace of the field of geology. As well as being the first town in California to be the subject of a geologic map, it was also were the first municipality in the state to have its own resident geologist on the city payroll. This was due, in no small part, to the fact that the section of the San Andreas Fault responsible for the 1906 quake just happens to run right through their town. However, even with the great attention that was paid to the quake and Portola Valley’s commitment to all things geologic, the exact location of the fault trace has been a mystery over the past century.
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Duvernay: The next big shale play?
Leader-Post
Geologists have known for decades that oil and gas lay hidden inside Alberta's Duvernay shale, a vast underground rock formation as big as South Korea that runs along the foothills east of the Rocky Mountains. After testing those hunches with the drill bit, some companies are starting to fine tune development plans, committing hundreds of millions of dollars to tap an emerging resource play touted as North America's next big shale bonanza.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 5th Annual Symposium: Marcellus, Utica and Point Pleasant Shale: Energy Development and Enhancement
AIPG
The AIPG 5th Annual Symposium on Marcellus, Utica and Point Pleasant Shale: Energy Development and Enhancement, will be held April 16-17, 2014, at the Holiday Inn Columbus Downtown Capital Square in Columbus, Ohio. The discounted rate is $99. Contact the hotel at 866-460-7456.
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5th Conference: Innovative Environmental Assessment and Remediation Technology
AIPG
The AIPG Georgia Section 5th Conference: Innovative Environmental Assessment and Remediation Technology will be held April 23-24 in Kennesaw, Ga. Register online today.
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AIPG/AGWT 3rd Shale-Gas Development and Water Issues Symposium
AIPG
The Shale-Gas Development and Water Issues Symposium will take place in March 2014 in Houston. More information will be available later.
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AIPG-AHS 2014 National Conference
AIPG
Join us for the AIPG-AHS 2014 National Conference, Sept. 13-16, 2014, in Prescott, Ariz. The conference will be held at the Prescott Resort & Conference Center, 855-957-4637.
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New student chapter: Eastern Illinois University
AIPG
Welcome our newest student chapter: Eastern Illinois University, from Charleston, Ill.; Chapter Sponsor: Craig McCammack, MEM; Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Diane Marie Burns. Student Chapter Officers: President: Jeremy Wells, SA-4807; Vice President: Kaitlyn James, SA-4810; Secretary: John Zearing, SA-4809; Treasurer: and Daniel White, SA-4814. Welcome!
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Accepting applications for the position of AIPG Executive Director
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The successful candidate will succeed the current director who has announced his intent to retire. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Click on the "Read More" link for details.
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Button-up long sleeve denim AIPG shirt
AIPG
A 6.5 oz. fabric, 100 percent cotton, garment washed, generous cut, double needle stitched, tuck-in tail, button-down collar, horn tone buttons, patch pocket and adjustable cuffs with an embroidered AIPG logo is now available. Available in sizes small-3XL (additional fees for 2XL and 3XL sizes).


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TRENDING ARTICLE
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Physicists prove foaming beer bottle trick may help understand volcanic eruptions
The Telegraph
For Isaac Newton it was an apple falling from a tree that helped him devise one of the most significant theories in physics. Now almost 350 years later, scientists have turned to another mundane object in an attempt to understand more about the world around us. They are attempting to study the complex phenomonen of bubble dynamics by looking at the party prank where tapping the top of a bottle of beer causes it to overflow with foam.

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'Door to Hell': Turkmenistan crater has been on fire for over 40 years
International Science Times
In 1971, the Soviets opened the "Door to Hell," and 42 years later that door is still open. A natural gas field in Derweze, Turkmenistan, the Door to Hell is the site of a former Soviet oil operation that went wrong when a rig collapsed into a large crater. Soviet geologists decided the best thing to do was light the crater on fire to burn off its poisonous methane gas, but things didn't go as planned, and the fire still burns today.

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Greenland ice sheet was smaller 3,000-5,000 years ago
redOrbit
There have been many studies telling us how small the Greenland ice sheet is today. A new study, published in the journal Geology, reveals that the ice sheet was actually smaller between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago. Surprisingly, the sheet was as small during this period as it has ever been in recent history.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


'Protective' marine worm discovered
FIS
A team of researchers from the University of Barcelona and the Spanish Institute of Oceanography discovered a nemertean worm in Antarctic waters with an exceptional feature: it incubates its eggs and defends them from external threats.
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'Secret' labyrinth of tunnels under Rome mapped
Fox News
Deep under the streets and buildings of Rome is a maze of tunnels and quarries that dates back to the very beginning of this ancient city. Now, geologists are venturing beneath Rome to map these underground passageways, hoping to prevent modern structures from crumbling into the voids below.
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Geologists continue to study cause behind massive Denali National Park landslide
National Parks Traveler
Geologists are continuing to search for the cause behind a massive landslide at Denali National Park and Preserve that had blocked the park road near Mile 38 in late October. The slide, which coverd approximately 200 feet of the road in depths of up to 35 feet, was released from a point 500 feet above the road and flowed south below the road, according to park officials.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Seawater discovered near the Chesapeake Bay is up to 150 million years old (The Washington Post)
Stonehenge: Origin of stones discovered (Epoch Times)
'Door to Hell': Turkmenistan crater has been on fire for over 40 years (International Science Times)
Geologizing with Doctor Who (Scientific American)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Indirect study of Earth's core
Phys.org
The center of the Earth is about 4,000 miles away, roughly the distance between Phoenix and the North Pole. It cannot be seen. It cannot be touched. And it cannot be sampled. But that doesn't stop Dan Shim, a mineral physicist in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at ASU, from trying to understand the forces working deep within our world. Studying the interior of the Earth helps scientists answer questions about how the Earth has changed over billions of years and why there are volcanoes and earthquakes, Shim said.
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Near-complete dinosaur baby a rare find
University of Alberta via Phys.org
Philip Currie has made some spectacular and rare fossil finds while dino hunting in Alberta's badlands, so when he says a discovery ranks among the best of his career, it's significant. The internationally renowned University of Alberta paleontologist unearthed a remarkably preserved, near-complete skeleton of a baby Chasmosaurus belli. It's the first time anyone has found a baby of this species intact in 150 years of digs at Dinosaur Provincial Park — or anywhere for that matter.
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South Australian government releases new geological data outlining mineral potential of the highly prospective Far North
The Australian
Geological data aimed at identifying as much as $35 billion of mineral treasure in South Australia's Outback was recently published. Describing it as a "game changer for exploration", SA's chief geologist Steve Hill said the data was being made freely available to companies to help target the highly prospective Far North of the state.
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