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Ancient water discovery leads to 'quantum change' in understanding of Earth's habitability
International Business Times
The discovery of ancient hydrogen-rich water in extremely remote areas has led to a "quantum change" in our understanding of how much of the Earth's crust could support life, scientists have said. The water was discovered trapped kilometres below Earth's surface in rock fractures in Canada, South Africa and Scandinavia. It has been described as a "sleeping giant" in terms of its potential to provide energy for life.
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Curiosity samples methane surges in Martian atmosphere
Ars Technica
On Earth, the majority of the methane that finds its way into the atmosphere is produced by microbes. Once in the atmosphere, the gas is broken down by a number of processes, so its continued presence there is a testimony to Earth's activity, both biological and geological. Mars' atmosphere breaks down methane as well, but there are also low levels of methane in its atmosphere. The Curiosity rover has observed spikes in the atmosphere's methane concentration that seem to indicate a sporadic, local source.
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Rock with 30,000 diamonds found but their origin is still unknown
Digital Journal
A mysterious Russian rock has been discovered containing 30,000 tiny diamonds. The rock itself may actually be worth a minimal amount, but its strange form adds to the mystery of how diamonds are actually created.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now available to pay online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2015, in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to log in to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205.

Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.

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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

Donate online.

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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

gtech.mst.edu
 


AIPG call for abstracts — 2015 Energy Exposition
AIPG
Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists at the 2015 Energy Exposition in Billings, Montana! Present and attend the technical sessions organized and hosted by AIPG on June 24-25 with an optional field trip on Friday, June 26. The schedule is structured to allow plenty of time to browse and participate in the Energy Exposition. Registration will include "Breakfast and a Movie" both days, lunch and reduced ticket pricing for the Expo dinner on June 25. Click here for additional information on the Energy Exposition. The technical session presentations will be held at the Rimrock Arena within the MetraPark Expo Center, 308 6th Avenue N., Billings, Montana, 59101. To have your abstract considered for a presentation please submit an abstract online by March 9, 2015.
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AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG

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AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist (TPG)
AIPG
The AIPG quarterly journal, The Professional Geologist, October/November/December 2014 issue is now available online.
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Request for award nominations
AIPG
Nominations for awards, accompanied by a supporting statement should be sent via mail (to AIPG, 12000 Washington Street, Thornton, Colorado 80241-3134), fax (303-253-9220) or email by Jan. 15 to the AIPG National Headquarters. National awards include the Ben H. Parker Memorial Medal, the Martin Van Couvering Memorial Award, the John T. Galey, Sr. Memorial Public Service Award, Honorary Membership and the Outstanding Achievement Award. (Click on each link to go to the award's description.) Click here for AIPG National Awards Nomination Form in pdf.
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AIPG polo rapid-dry sport shirt
AIPG
Put the moisture-wicking secret weapon of this Rapid Dry™ technology to work for you. The fabric wicks moisture away from the body to the surface where it evaporates, keeping you comfortable and dry. This soft, breathable fabric is a superstar performer for any situation where you might need a little extra confidence and moisture protection. Available in a variety of colors and sizes. AIPG member price: $33.50, plus shipping.


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AIPG ladies silk touch polo
AIPG
This new Port Authority® Ladies Silk Touch™ Performance Polo wicks moisture, resists snags and thanks to PosiCharge™ technology, holds onto its color for a professional look that lasts. There's just no higher performing polo at this price! AIPG Members price is $24 plus shipping. Available colors: black, bright purple, brilliant blue, Carolina blue, dark green, lime, maroon, navy, neon orange, neon yellow, pink raspberry, red, royal blue, steel grey, tea green and white.


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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Jan. 1 Deadline for AIPG membership dues Pay Online
Jan. 16 Call for Abstracts due for the 5th Annual AIPG Michigan Section Technical Workshop: Site Characterization AIPG Michigan Section
Jan. 31 AIPG Kentucky Section Review and Skills for Professional Geologists Exams Announcements
Feb. 13 AIPG National Executive Committee Meeting Tucson, Arizona
March 2015 AIPG/AGWT Shale-Gas Development and Water Issues Conference Houston
March 14-21 AIPG Kentucky Section Bahamas Short Course Field Trip Announcements
April AIPG Hydraulic Fracturing Conference TBD
April 11 AIPG Georgia Section Field Trip Southern Ionics Heavy Mineral Mine
June 24-25 2015 Energy Exposition with Technical Sessions Presented by AIPG Billings, Montana
Sept. 19-22 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section
Sept. 29-30 AIPG Georgia Section: "Innovative Environmental Assessment of Remediation Technology Kennesaw, Georgia
Sept. 9-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


INDUSTRY NEWS


Scientists re-create what may be life's 1st spark
Star Tribune
Researchers have re-created a split-second impact of a meteor with primordial Earth, and shown how the 3.5-megaton collision might have reorganized common molecules into some of the early building blocks that led to all life. The researchers zapped clay and a chemical soup with the laser to simulate the energy of a speeding asteroid smashing into the planet. They ended up creating what can be considered crucial pieces of the building blocks of life.
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Low oxygen hobbled recovery from history's worst extinction
LiveScience
Wild temperature swings and low oxygen conditions may have caused life on Earth to recover in fits and starts from the planet's worst extinction, new research suggests. After the end-Permian extinction, in which most life on Earth perished, life rebounded only to be blasted again by hostile environmental conditions.
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Most abundant mineral found in planet named 'bridgmanite'
India Today
The most abundant mineral found in the planet has been named "bridgmanite." The mineral named bridgmanite, which is said to be made up of high density magnesium iron silicate, has been known to the geologists for quite some time. In a paper published in the journal Science, a team of geologists described how they were able to analyze a sample of the mineral in a meteorite.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Mineral.


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Comet's water different from Earth's (USA Today)
Proof of Japan's kamikaze typhoons found in ancient rocks (Popular Science)
Mars rover revealed evidence of vast water formations (Liberty Voice)
The hydrological rise and fall of The Roman Empire (Science 2.0)
Ancient mollusk discovered under the Arctic (Nature World News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Study: Southern San Andreas fault's geometry may lessen quake danger
NBC News
The Southern San Andreas fault may not be as dangerous as previously thought — at least for the towns and cities directly to the west of it. New three-dimensional modeling shows that instead of being oriented straight up and down, the fault, which runs roughly northwesterly through the Coachella Valley, dips 60-70 degrees to the northeast, according to a study published in Geosphere.
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NASA reveals the complex hidden secrets of Greenland's ice sheets
The Weather Network
Using satellites and airborne missions, scientists are delving into the secrets of Greenland's glacial ice, revealing the most detailed look yet at how the ice sheet flows and how much of it is lost every year. For decades, scientists have been monitoring the ice sheets covering Greenland, noting changes in the ice elevation and how it flows along from the interior of the island towards the coastal waters.
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The revival of anthracite mining
The Telegraph
Anthracite constitutes only about 1 percent of the world's coal reserves but it's no ordinary coal destined to be burned in power stations. It is a premium, high carbon, high heat value, low sulphur product with its special qualities giving it many applications in the steel and metal industries, water filtration, home heating and other specialized industrial applications. The anthracite coalfields of north-eastern Pennsylvania have been exploited for more than 200 years and, up until the 1960s, were mainly worked by underground miners. Today, with improved surface-mining techniques, it's possible to go back in and re-mine properties that had previously been deep-mined.
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Unique new worm species has reversed its own evolution
Raw Story
An unusual, newly discovered type deep-sea worm lives on the bones of dead animals and features males that have grown significantly larger than their predecessors, researchers from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography report in a new study. The authors of the new Current Biology paper detailing the discovery report that the worms have reversed their own course of evolution like no other creature before. Not only have they grown larger than their forebears, they mate in vastly different ways than their closest relatives.
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