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Geologists simulate deep earthquakes in the laboratory
YottaFire
More than 20 years ago, geologist Harry Green, now a distinguished professor of the graduate division at the University of California, Riverside, and colleagues discovered a high-pressure failure mechanism that they proposed then was the long-sought mechanism of very deep earthquakes. The result was controversial because seismologists could not find a seismic signal in the Earth that could confirm the results. Until now.
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Geologists find diamond-producing rocks in Antarctica
io9
For the first time ever, geologists working in Antarctica have found a type of rock that's known to bear diamonds — a discovery that could expose the polar continent to opportunistic prospectors. Called kimberlite, it's a volcanic rock that appears in vertical structures called kimberlite pipes — the single most important source of mined diamonds today.
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Combustible ice exploration in China paves way for green energy
Want China Times
At a time when the global economy is exploring all kinds of alternative energy sources, China announced that combustible ice — frozen methane and water — may replace traditional energy sources such as oil, with commercial development of the new resource in China likely around 2030. Methane hydrate is an ice-like substance that is sometimes called combustible ice since it can literally be lit on fire and burned as fuel. One cubic meter of methane hydrate can general 164-180 cubic meters of natural gas.
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AIPG NEWS


Pay 2014 dues online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2014 in accordance with the Bylaws. You are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2014. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on MEMBER LOGIN to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
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Accepting applications for the position of AIPG Executive Director
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The successful candidate will succeed the current director who has announced his intent to retire. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
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AIPG bi-monthly journal
AIPG
The November/December 2013 issue of The Professional Geologist is now available online. All past issues are also available.
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AIPG young professional member documents
AIPG
AIPG has published over 230 articles and other documents specifically addressing student and young professionals in The Professional Geologist and as independent documents over the years. These articles have been collected along with a topical index of the articles that will assist in locating specific articles and documents addressing a specific topic.

Included in this collection are all of the Student's Voice columns, the articles for students published in the January issue of the TPG over the past several years, other student-authored articles, etc. Over the years, a wealth of useful information and advice is included in this collection, which will be updated as each issue of the TPG is published.

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Request for 2014 National Awards nominations
AIPG
Send in your nominations for the AIPG 2014 National Awards due Jan. 20.
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AIPG 5th Annual Symposium: Call for abstracts
AIPG
AIPG has issued a call for abstracts for its 5th Annual Symposium: Marcellus, Utica, and Point Pleasant Shale: Energy Development and Enhancement, April 16-17, 2014, in Columbus, Ohio.
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AIPG polar fleece vest available
AIPG
Ready for layering, this super soft fleece vest offers great warmth at a great price. It is embroidered with AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold. Available colors: black, navy, grey heather, royal, charcoal, midnight heather and red. Women's vests and other apparel are available.


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Researchers: Mountains crumbled when Earth cooled
LiveScience via NBC News
A big chill 2 million years ago bred glaciers that scoured mountains across the planet, pouring trillions of tons of muck into the oceans, researchers said in a study published in the journal Nature. Geologists have long suspected that a cold climate boosts erosion rates, thanks to clues in ocean floor sediments.

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20 ancient supervolcanoes discovered in Utah and Nevada
Sci-News.com
Geologists from Brigham Young University, Berkeley Geochronology Center and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have found evidence of twenty ancient supervolcanoes near the Utah-Nevada border. The newly discovered supervolcanoes aren't active today, but 30 million years ago more than 5,500 cubic km of magma erupted during a one-week period near a place called Wah Wah Springs.

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Earth's greatest killer finally caught, thanks to geologists
NBC News
Geology is partly detective work, and scientists now have enough evidence to book a suspect in the biggest environmental catastrophe in Earth's history. Painstaking analysis of rocks from China and Russia prove the culprit is a series of massive volcanic eruptions, which flooded ancient Siberia with thick lava flows just before Earth's worst mass extinction almost 252 million years ago.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Expedition explores underwater 'grand canyon'
LiveScience via Fox News
A five-week expedition to map and sample a giant underwater canyon off the northwest coast of Morocco has completed its mission, yielding the best look yet at the deep-sea wonder. More than half a mile deep, 280 miles long and up to 20 miles wide, Agadir Canyon is approximately the size of the Grand Canyon. A joint team of British and German scientists aboard the German research vessel Maria S Merian took images and samples of the seafloor to create a high-resolution 3-D map of the canyon and sample its marine life.
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Laser scanning and 3-D imaging shows lava flow patterns
Vision Systems Design
Scientists from the University of Oregon have utilized laser scanning lidar technology to capture aerial images of volcanoes which in turn are used to produce 3-D models that recreate the internal structure of lava flow. With the lidar technique, the researchers are reportedly able to digitally extract trees and other objects from the images, providing a clear, high-resolution image for analysis.
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Megafloods may have carved canyons on both Earth and Mars
LiveScience via NBC News
Nearly 50,000 years ago, a megaflood may have washed across the area that is now Idaho, carving a gorge — a discovery that could explain similar canyons on Mars, a new study finds. Canyons are ravines typically created by rivers slicing into rock over eons. The shapes of canyons are clues to how water has flowed in the past — not just on Earth, but also on Mars.
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Rock Doc column: Ancient climate clues in tree rings
Washington State University
In the southwest U.S., a lot of work has been done with tree rings. Indeed, the whole science of what's called dendrochronology was worked out in that region in the early and mid 20th century. But since then, scientists around the world have also used basic ideas about tree rings to do several different things.
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Geologists have incentive to be naughty
Scientific American
Dana Hunter, science blogger and geology addict, never understood why getting a lump of coal instead of presents should be considered a problem. As a coal miner's daughter, she would beg her father to bring her a lump of coal from the mine.
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California soil drilling prepares for high-speed rail construction
The Fresno Bee
Geologists began drilling holes and collecting soil samples in downtown Fresno in preparation for the first stages of construction on California's proposed high-speed train project. It's the first of more than two dozen locations between the northeast edge of Madera and the south end of Fresno where the company will test the subsurface soil conditions. The tests offer a mole's-eye view to geologists.
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