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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit January 14, 2015


 

DeGette begins push for approval of Cuban drug for foot ulcers
KCNC-TV
When Mason McClatchey applied for grad school, he set out with an ambitious goal: to advance diabetes research. He's a scientist and he's a diabetic. "I started realizing there were a lot of tools that I could envision that I do not have, and science helps those who help themselves (so) I figured I would go make them," he said. Among the missing tools was an effective treatment for foot ulcers, a common complication for diabetics that sometimes leads to amputation.
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 APWCA Highlights


Save the date: March 25-29, 2015
APWCA
Join us for the 14th Annual APWCA National Clinical Conference
March 25-29
Loews Philadelphia Hotel

Register online now and save.

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 Industry News


Boston scientists developing SMART bandage called 'window into the wound'
WSBK-TV
When someone has a cut or a burn, it can be tough to tell if it healing properly. Even by an experienced eye. But scientists at the Wellman Center at Masschusetts General Hospital are working on a SMART bandage that can be a "window into a wound." The creation is a simple design that could revolutionize how wounds are managed, especially burns and diabetic ulcers that can be a challenge because it's hard to tell if they're healing properly.
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Scientists discover potential weapon against a range of diseases in potent antibiotic
The Wall Street Journal (tiered subscription model)
Scientists have discovered a powerful new antibiotic they say can kill an array of germs without the bugs easily becoming resistant to it, a potential weapon against a range of diseases. The discovery is a rare — and much-needed — breakthrough in the quest for new antibiotics to overcome the problem of growing resistance to existing drugs.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Skin patch could help heal, prevent diabetic ulcers (Science Blog)
Predictive factors identified for diabetic foot surgery (Diabetes.co.uk)
NICE issues guidance on a device to detect diabetic nerve damage (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence)
What's behind high generic drug prices? (By Mike Wokasch)
Save the date: March 25-29, 2015 (APWCA)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Traveling with chronic illnesses, especially diabetes
By Cynthia Sheppard Solomon
Whether a patient has diabetes or some other chronic illness, being prepared can make a trip much more pleasant. For example, carrying a personal health record complete with lists of prescriptions, dietary supplements and other personal information can make a huge difference in how enjoyable a trip can be, should something surprising occur. Are your patients comfortable speaking with you about upcoming travels? Have you ever forgotten your meds when you are away from home? Can you relate to their struggles?
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Wound-induced skin cancer triggered by bacteria
Melanoma News Today
In a new study entitled Innate Sensing of Microbial Products Promotes Wound-Induced Skin Cancer, a team of researchers at the King's College London discovered that immune cells' recognition of bacteria via innate mechanisms can trigger skin tumor formation. The study was published in the journal Nature Communications.
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Why we need to liberate America's healthcare
PBS
Editor's note: Our healthcare debate, Robert Graboyes says, is trapped. Caught in the back-and-forth over insurance coverage, both the proponents and opponents of the Affordable Care Act are missing the point. To Graboyes, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center, distribution of healthcare is not the problem. It's the creation of better healthcare that will save more lives and cut costs. And while his thesis resonates with the laissez-faire, pro-market attitude most often heard on the political right, he implicates both sides in holding America's healthcare hostage in his recently published paper "Fortress and Frontier in American Health Care."
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