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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit June 03, 2014


 

New techniques for the prevention, treatment of chronic sores
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology via Medical Xpress
As the average age in our society continues to increase, more and more people are suffering from chronic sores. In an ideal world this would be preventable or at least the wounds could be treated so as to heal well without leaving scars. However current methods of treatment have only been partially successful and therefore there is great interest in new therapeutic techniques.
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Scientists fire up a laser to spur tooth stem cells into repair mode
Tech Times
A Harvard-led team of scientists and engineers, headed by David J. Mooney, professor of bioengineering at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, have demonstrated how low-power laser light can trigger stem cells in the body to regenerate tissue. This has applications in both restorative dentistry and in regenerative medicine, such as wound healing and bone regeneration.
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Doctor develops simple treatment for flesh-eating disease
San Francisco Chronicle
Hypochlorous acid — which is made when chlorine is dissolved in water, but also produced naturally by the body's immune cells — is a common ingredient in cleansing solutions to treat necrotizing fasciitis, but it's usually mixed with other agents. Doctors would irrigate wounds from necrotizing fasciitis with this solution of hypochlorous acid that was developed by NovaBay Pharmaceuticals in Emeryville, California, then drain the wound with a negative-pressure vacuum apparatus. The NovaBay scientists say they're able to manufacture a pure solution of the acid in saline, which renders it both stronger and safer. The product, called NeutroPhase, is federally approved for cleaning wounds, but not for treatment of necrotizing fasciitis.
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Recent advances in nanohybrid hydrogels for drug delivery
Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Hydrogels are preferred materials for drug delivery due to their soft, elastomeric nature as well as their high water-retaining capability. The only problem is they have poor mechanical strength, but that can be improved by the incorporation of nanoparticles. Nanohybrids — containing the composites of carbon nanotubes, or CNTs — and polymeric hydrogels are considered as promising drug-delivery materials in recent research. These nanohybrids possess the properties of both CNTs and hydrogels with improved mechanical, physiochemical and biological properties.
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Findings have important implications for improving war wound healing
American Society for Microbiology via News-Medical.Net
War wounds that heal successfully frequently contain different microbial species from those that heal poorly, according to a paper published ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. These and other findings have important implications for improving wound healing, says first author Nicholas Be of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California.
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Heal wounds with fish skin?
The Doctors via Boston Globe
A scaly treatment for chronic wounds caused by diabetes and other circulatory disorders: See how fish skin is being used to help human tissue regenerate.
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Researchers ID protein involved in wound healing, tumor growth
Dermatology Times
A protein that plays a role in healing wounds and in tumor growth could be a future therapeutic target, recent research suggests. Investigators with Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine, studied iRhom2, a protein involved in epithelial regeneration and cancer growth by way of constitutive activation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, according to the study abstract. Researchers introduced mutations in Rhbdf2, the gene responsible for encoding the iRhom2 protein. Doing so allowed for an extension of the protein's duration and wound-healing capabilities, according to a news release.
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FDA approves Dalvance to treat skin infections
Medical News Today
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Dalvance, a new antibacterial drug used to treat adults with skin infections. Dalvance is intended to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by certain susceptible bacteria, like Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. The treatment is administered intravenously.
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Wound Care Report
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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