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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit August 27, 2014


 

Epidermal grafting using a novel suction blister–harvesting system for treatment of pyoderma gangrenosum
JAMA Dermatology
Pyoderma gangrenosum is a neutrophilic dermatosis characterized by chronic, recurrent ulcerations of the skin. Currently, most first-line and second-line treatments are anecdotal and no gold standard treatment for PG exists. Although patients may respond to systemic medications aimed at reducing underlying inflammation associated with PG, in many cases, large wounds remain. Skin grafting is problematic because of the potential for pathergy, a phenomenon in which new or worsening ulcerations may develop following trauma or surgery. In addition, application of tissue-engineered skin often is not reimbursed; thus, limited clinical options exist to provide wound coverage.
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 APWCA Highlights


Business course, Sept. 13-14
APWCA
This day and a half course will address the issues associated with opening a new wound care and hyperbaric center. In addition, the program introduces techniques to increase the efficiency and profitability of established centers.

Join us Sept. 13-14 at the Hilton Philadelphia Airport.

Click "Read More" for further information, cost and registration.

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 Industry News


1st clinical trial for new skin wound-healing compound is a success
HealthCanal.com
Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientist Robert Gourdie developed a wound-healing peptide while researching how electrical signals trigger heartbeats. He never imagined that the peptide, ACT1, would prove to heal venous leg ulcers twice as quickly as the current standard of care.
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The physics of wound healing
Asian Scientist
An international team of scientists has uncovered a new way by which wounds repair themselves. Reported in Nature Physics, this finding has exciting implications for the development of treatments and drugs that speed up healing. Current research already has established two processes at play in mending injury in the body.
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Diabetic neuropathic pain improved with vegan diet
Healthcare Professionals Network
A change in diet may improve diabetic neuropathy pain, according to a controlled study of patients with Type 2 diabetes presented at the recent American Association of Diabetes Educators Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    ACHM consensus statement on physician credentialing for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (The American College of Hyperbaric Medicine)
Case report: Using medical silicone to ensure an airtight negative pressure wound therapy dressing seal in challenging wounds (Ostomy Wound Management)
Proteins critical to wound healing are identified (Infection Control Today)
Business course, Sept. 13-14 (APWCA)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


The growing threat of antibiotic resistance
By Rosemary Sparacio
A number of diseases once easily treatable have become resistant to antibiotics currently on the market, and that number continues to grow. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has warned that antibiotic resistance is such a serious problem that it could be the "next pandemic." Obviously, the growth of antibiotic-resistant pathogens means that more and more cases emerge where standard treatments no longer work, infections become more difficult to control, and the risk of spreading infections to others is increased — especially when hospital stays are prolonged.
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Editorial: Understanding wound care's psychology
Today's Wound Clinic
The wound care visit, or any medical visit for that matter, is, under the best of circumstances, a daunting experience for our patients. They come to us with a myriad of emotions and feelings, including concern, fear, misunderstanding, anger and sadness. How we recognize, address and manage those feelings is what establishes trust and adherence and what sets the stage for our future visits. The ultimate outcome of our wound-healing efforts depends upon our knowledge and skill as providers as well as the ability and willingness of the patient to adhere to our recommendations. That ability and willingness, in turn, depends upon patient understanding and trust.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords WOUND HEALING.
 



Wound Care Report
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Rebecca Eberhardt, Content Editor, 469.420.2608  
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