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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit September 03, 2014


 

Iron, skin and wound healing
Healthcare Professionals Network
Healthy skin, mucous membranes, hair and nails need adequate iron. When patients are iron-deficient, their pallor, fragile or concave nails and brittle hair are clinical clues. They also tend to suffer as the deficiency magnifies with itching, skin infection and inflammation at the corners of the mouth, according to a new article discussing iron's role in the skin in Frontiers in Pharmacology.
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 APWCA Highlights


Business course, Sept. 13-14
APWCA
This day and a half course will address the issues associated with opening a new wound care and hyperbaric center. In addition, the program introduces techniques to increase the efficiency and profitability of established centers.

Join us Sept. 13-14 at the Hilton Philadelphia Airport.

Click "Read More" for further information, cost and registration.

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Save the date: March 25-29
APWCA
Join us for the 14th Annual APWCA National Clinical Conference
March 25-29
Loews Philadelphia Hotel

Register online now and save.

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 Industry News


Mexican experts develop a treatment against diabetic foot's amputation
teleSUR
Experts from one of Latin America's largest public higher education institutes, the National Autonomous University of Mexico, have developed a drug that will prevent diabetic patients from having their feet amputated, according to a statement by Dr. Pedro Peña Santoyo, who is heading up the project.
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Nurse converts corn pads into quick fix for minor diabetic ulcers
MedCity News
Corn pads probably are not the first remedy that pops up when people think of cost-effective ways to prevent diabetic ulcers from worsening to the point where patients need to be admitted to a hospital, or worse, have a foot amputated. But a nurse innovating on the job highlighted her discovery in a guest blog post on MakerNurse's website.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords WOUND HEALING.


Painful wounds: Assessment and intervention
Wound Educators
Wounds often cause pain, and untreated may may lead to decreased adherence with wound care. For this reason, it is important to assess patients for the presence of pain and ask what the patient is doing to relieve pain. If pain is inadequately treated, the wound care clinician should intervene to relieve pain to the greatest extent possible.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    ACHM consensus statement on physician credentialing for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (The American College of Hyperbaric Medicine)
Case report: Using medical silicone to ensure an airtight negative pressure wound therapy dressing seal in challenging wounds (Ostomy Wound Management)
Proteins critical to wound healing are identified (Infection Control Today)
Business course, Sept. 13-14 (APWCA)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Insulin use, dialysis predicted poor wound healing after endovascular therapy
Healio
Patients undergoing endovascular therapy for critical limb ischemia were significantly more likely to have nonhealing wounds if they used insulin, were dependent on hemodialysis or had major tissue loss, according to recent findings. The researchers aimed to determine factors associated with nonhealing of wounds in patients who have undergone successful endovascular therapy for critical limb ischemia.
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2-drug combo speeds wound healing, reduces scar tissue
Drug Discovery & Development
A combination of two drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for different applications reduces wound healing time by one-quarter and significantly decreases scar tissue in mice and rats, Johns Hopkins researchers report. If the findings, reported in the September issue of the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, hold true in future human studies, the dual treatment could speed skin healing in people with skin ulcers, extensive burns, surgical wounds and battlefield injuries.
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Wound Care Report
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Rebecca Eberhardt, Content Editor, 469.420.2608  
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