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Macrophages chase neutrophils away from wounds to resolve inflammation
Rockefeller University Press via Medical Xpress
Macrophages are best known for their Pac Man-like ability to gobble up cellular debris and pathogens in order to thwart infection. A new study in The Journal of Cell Biology describes how these immune cells also help resolve inflammation by inducing white blood cells called neutrophils to leave wounded tissue.
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 Industry News


Amputees found to shy away from prosthetics
Science Network WA via Medical Xpress
Researchers have predicted several points in time in which lower-limb amputees may stop using their prostheses after they are discharged from rehab. Fiona Stanley Hospital senior physiotherapist for Amputee Rehabilitation Caroline Roffman in Australia conducted the research with Royal Perth Hospital scientists to determine the best treatment options for patients with lower limb amputation.
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Researchers examining new paths to treat pain and inflammation
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Pain of any type — whether acute or chronic — is the most frequent reason for physician consultation in the United States, prompting half of all Americans to seek medical care annually. Although separate conditions, pain and inflammation are nearly always associated with each other. Despite the prevalence of these conditions, the primary options available for their treatment have changed surprisingly little in recent years. Steroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates are still the mainstay treatments, although all have their drawbacks.
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California hospital's patient safety protocols now require a wearable
MobiHealthNews
A California hospital has begun requiring certain patients use a wearable remote patient monitoring device in order to comply with internal patient safety protocols. Chino Valley Medical Center is employing the Leaf Patient Monitoring System from Pleasanton-based Leaf Healthcare. The sensor monitors patient movement in bed, then uses that data to calculate when the patient needs to be turned to prevent the formation of pressure ulcers.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords PATIENT SAFETY.


Potato and rapeseed: Sources of future cardiovascular health?
MTT Agrifood Research Finland via Medical Xpress
Potato and rapeseed industry produce vast amounts of protein-rich byproducts, which could be utilized in the production of high-quality foodstuffs. In her thesis, Sari Mäkinen, Research Scientist at the MTT Agrifood Research Finland has developed methods of producing bioactive peptides from the food industry byproducts. In her research, Mäkinen also analyzed the antioxidant properties of the peptides. They can further improve cardiovascular health by inhibiting oxidation reactions in cells.
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Have faith, early adopters: Telehealth's time is finally here
By Karen R. Thomas
In the tech world, the early-adoption phase of new software and devices is always filled with the anticipation and excitement of users wondering what the new technology will be like, how it will make life easier and how it might change the industry. People stand in lines for days waiting for the release of updated technology products. But, as with most new things, the early stages of new technology can be tricky for a number of reasons — especially when the technology is tied to operating an old business model like healthcare in a new way.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Surprise finding has implications for wound repair therapies and inhibiting cancer (Medical News Today)
Paper: An easy tool for tracking pressure ulcer data (Wound Care Advisor)
Innovation could spur much-needed advances in treating diabetic foot ulcers (Physicians News Digest)
Survey: Cost trumps health for many Americans (By Scott E. Rupp)
Study: Skin adhesive rivals sutures in wound-closing (Cosmetic Surgery Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



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