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The only metric that matters in education technology: Student outcomes
Forbes
Education technology is getting a lot of attention these days. The Obama administration proposed nearly $4 billion to help wire our schools. Meanwhile, more than $600 million in venture capital poured into ed tech last year — a 32 percent increase over the prior year. Teachers have also embraced the use of technology — almost unanimously. In a recent survey, 96 percent of teachers reported that technology is making a significant impact in their classroom. But despite broad adoption and educator enthusiasm, two opposing narratives have emerged regarding the use of technology in our schools. As is often the case in policy and politics, neither side fully reflects the reality on the ground.
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It's time for every student to learn to code
eSchool News
Recently, there has been a lot of discussion around the importance of coding in the K-12 classroom. Should it be compulsory for all students? An elective? Reserved for those students considering a computer science major in college? The answer may come down to supply and demand. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, by 2020, there will be 1.4 million computing jobs and only 400,000 computer science students to fill those roles. This represents a gap of one million jobs that will go unfilled, and amounts to a $500 billion opportunity lost.
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How virtualization makes BYOD a viable alternative to 1-to-1
THE Journal
Educational IT leaders should not be "trying to do the same thing you've always done for less money," but instead "doing something you can't do any other way," according to Doug Meade, the director of information technology at York County School Division in Virgina. In a session at the Citrix Synergy conference in Orlando, Florida, Meade described how York County (which serves 12,700 students and 2,000 employees), was faced with a familiar problem.
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Three education technology myths
Edutopia
We are constantly hearing about how some piece of new tech will transform teaching and learning in the classroom. We believe that if something is shiny, new, and slick, it will inevitably be good for the classroom. In other words, we believe that technology will solve the ills of the 21st-century classroom. This can, however, lead to blind adoption or ill-planned implementation.
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Don't let class tech be just a garnish
MiddleWeb (commentary)
Cheryl Mizerny, a contributor for MiddleWeb, writes: "During my college years, I worked as a server at several restaurants to pay my rent. At the swankiest of these, I recall the chef once telling his sous chefs to take their time plating neatly and to remember the garnish. He was fond of saying, 'Do you know the difference between a ten-dollar dinner and a fifteen? Parsley.' In the current educational climate, where any lesson that utilizes technology is considered superior, I can't help but notice that a lot of what is being done is just adding parsley."
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Eight ways to improve your digital teaching
eSchool News
We all remember that one dedicated teacher from our early years. While they might not have had access to the same technology we do, they brought the world to us with images, stories, and play-pretend. They likely would've been one of the first to Skype with amazing people across the globe, competitively Kahoot, or have us build word clouds to help us learn vocabulary. They were full of life and encouraged us to find our personality. In short, they were great teachers. Good teaching is the result of the conscious engagement between the teacher and the students, in an environment fostering inquiry, discovery, and creation. Good teaching is what makes digital age environments meaningful to students. Good pedagogy is the key to learning, regardless of the tool.
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Laptops expected to be biggest K-12 tech expense in 2015
THE Journal
IT spending by K-12 in the United States is expected to hit about $4.7 billion for 2015. The biggest single area for technology spending will be laptop computers at $1.4 billion. Those estimates come out of a new IT spending pivot table from IDC Government Insights, which provides estimates and forecasts for the entire U.S. education sector, encompassing K-12, higher ed and "other" education. According to the analyst firm, the guidance will be published bi-annually. The report will include details on education level, individual states, education functional areas, enrollment levels and technology segments.
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Can students click their way to a better world?
The Hechinger Report
The rap on kids these days is that they don't know much about civic life, and they care even less. But a growing group of scholars says the problem isn't with the kids, but rather with an outdated approach to teaching civics. The public square is increasingly online, they argue, and that's where civics education needs to go, too. Instead of addressing our civics shortcomings just by adding more classes and mandating tests, we should tap technology to better engage young people in both the learning and the doing of democracy.
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For the love of reading: Using technology to draw students to literacy
By: Pamela Hill (commentary)
My love for reading goes back further than I can actually recall. As an educator, I want my students to love to read, not just learn to read. Parents of students with diagnosed reading disabilities want their children to read and enjoy reading as well. Students with diagnosed reading disabilities spend more of their educational hours in intensive reading instruction than the average reader. For this student, reading as a leisure activity often seems just out of reach.
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FCC: E-rate funding requests for schools, libraries to be paid in full
Education Week
Schools and libraries will receive full funding of their E-rate program requests this year, as a result of a modernization of the policy and budget changes enacted last year, according to the Federal Communications Commission. Authorized as part of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the E-rate program was implemented to help schools and libraries underwrite the cost of telecommunications services like phones and pagers, and to have Internet access.
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Computer Science Today
Tiffany Nash, CSTA Events and Communications Manager, 971-506-6476
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