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Text Version   RSS   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit January 06, 2015

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Table of Contents
  • Thousands participate in largest study ever of bereaved military families
  • Studies: Workplace bullying leads to depression, other illnesses
  • Report: 74 percent of US businesses now offer EAP services
  • Managing the growing risk of opioid addictions
  • How the effects of trauma can be passed down from 1 generation to the next
  • The real cost of hangovers
  • Canada: New workplace harassment and violence initiatives to roll out in 2015
  • Study looks at marijuana's impact on brain
  • Rethinking the 'war on drugs'
  • Malaysian workplaces face alcohol/drug concerns
  • Early intervention could change nature of schizophrenia

  • Thousands participate in largest study ever of bereaved military families
    The Associated Press via Fox News
    With his wife and child close at hand, Army Maj. Chad Wriglesworth battled skin cancer for more than a year before dying at age 37. "It was long and painful and awful," said Aimee Wriglesworth, who believes the cancer resulted from exposure to toxic fumes in Iraq. Yet the 28-year-old widow from Bristow, Virginia, seized a chance to recount the ordeal and its aftermath to a researcher, hoping that input from her and her 6-year-old daughter might be useful to other grieving military families.
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    Studies: Workplace bullying leads to depression, other illnesses
    Safety+Health
    Workplace bullying can lead to depression and other illnesses, two separate studies recently concluded. Workplace harassment victims suffer stress, loss of sleep, depression and anxiety, according to a study published Nov. 16 in the Journal of Community Health.
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    Report: 74 percent of US businesses now offer EAP services
    PRWeb via InsuranceNewsNet.com
    Over the past twenty years, the number of businesses that have employee assistance programs has more than doubled. According to a 2014 Employee Benefits report from the Society for Human Resource Management, 74 percent of businesses currently offer EAP services. In particular, many businesses have rapidly adopted EAP services to help lower costs.
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    Managing the growing risk of opioid addictions
    Benefits Canada
    Stan was a long-time employee at a major technical manufacturer in a safety-sensitive job. When a work injury required knee surgery, he was prescribed an opioid to deal with post-operative pain. He found that in addition to helping with the knee pain, his prescription also helped him cope with lingering post-traumatic stress disorder from his military reserve experience. When he needed the medications long after the pain in his knee had subsided, his doctor stopped prescribing. Although Stan found another doctor, this new doctor also eventually refused to prescribe. When he couldn’t find a third doctor to prescribe, he turned to buying street drugs.
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    How the effects of trauma can be passed down from 1 generation to the next
    The Huffington Post
    Experiencing trauma early in childhood can lead to mental health problems in adolescence and adulthood, but mild to moderate trauma could also have an unexpected upside for some survivors, making them better able to cope with stressful situations later in life. Previous research has shown that the behavioral effects of trauma can be passed down to the next generation — but this research had only demonstrated that this transmission takes place with trauma's negative effects, such as depression. Now a study on mice, recently published in the journal Nature Communications, suggests that the adaptive benefits of trauma might also stay alive in families through the years.
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    The real cost of hangovers
    BBC
    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that excessive drinking costs the U.S. economy more than $220 billion annually — or about $1.90 a drink. Some 72 percent of the costs stem from lost workplace productivity. In Australia, sick days will cost up to $1.6 billion in lost productivity in the last two weeks of the year, with some 10 percent of the workers polled planning to take up to three sick days off to recover from their celebrations, according to a survey of 1,000 workers. And in the U.K., researchers estimated holiday-season hangovers cost businesses almost $40 million.
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    Canada: New workplace harassment and violence initiatives to roll out in 2015
    Lexology
    On Dec. 4, 2014, Premier Kathleen Wynne announced new initiatives to raise awareness of sexual violence and harassment, to enhance prevention measures and to combat harassment, violence and discrimination on the basis of sex. The initiatives are also intended to improve support available for victims of harassment, discrimination and violence in Canada.
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      FEATURED COMPANIES
    Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

    Under the influence of parents -- Study shows children of marijuana users far more likely to use. Learn more
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    Always there to answer the call: BHRW provides seamless 24/7 access to reliable behavioral health professionals. Providing crisis intervention, suicide intervention, fried counseling, and more! MORE


    Study looks at marijuana's impact on brain
    The Courier-Journal via USA Today
    Though marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug in the country, little is definitively known about its impact on the brain. A study taking place at Indiana University is designed to help change that. Clinical psychologist Brian O'Donnell and colleague Sharlene Newman are recruiting current and former marijuana users to participate in a study in which their brains will be analyzed for changes in structure and function.
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    Rethinking the 'war on drugs'
    Alternet
    2014 was an eventful year for the international drug war. Given that it consists mainly of violence, corruption, impoverishment, incarceration, addiction and other social harms, that is hardly good news, although a cynic might say that it makes for good drama. The following 10 events were among the most dramatic. Not only did they make headlines but they reflect larger themes — the extent to which drug war issues intersect with economic policy, military funding, public health, natural resources and the like. Taken together, they also reveal why the policy of prohibition, which has given rise to a trillion-dollar industry run by terrorist cartels, fuels the very war it is allegedly intended to end.
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    Malaysian workplaces face alcohol/drug concerns
    New Straits Times Press
    The escalating abuse of drugs and other psychoactive substances has become a major global concern, necessitating a comprehensive response and a collaborative and participatory partnership approach from all segments of society. Business and community collaboration is at the heart of such an approach. The workplace mirrors these problems as a result of the deteriorating health of workers, absenteeism, work accidents and other increased safety risks.
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    Early intervention could change nature of schizophrenia
    USA Today
    Tiffany Martinez was in a freshman history class at the University of Southern Maine when she was startled by a female voice. She whipped around to see who it was. No one was there. Martinez was just 17 and away from home for the first time. And while she didn't understand what was happening to her, she knew it was far more serious than homesickness.
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