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Table of Contents
  • Distress calls to Canadian public service helpline rise in 2012 amid job cuts
  • Mental illness linked to domestic violence
  • Gun control report: Professionals should report violent threats
  • Court: Death threat does not warrant workers' compensation benefits
  • Sandy Hook students return, putting spotlight on need to help children cope
  • Study: Workplace stress leads to fewer sick days taken in 2012
  • Report: Work has positive impact on mental health of young people
  • Mental health advocates call on Texas legislators to increase funding for mental illness treatment
  • Nonclinical approaches to mental health
  • Is it ever OK to cry at the office?
  • How to make a workplace wellness program stick



  • Distress calls to Canadian public service helpline rise
    in 2012 amid job cuts

    Global News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Distress calls to a Canadian public service helpline continued their steady rise in 2012 as bureaucrats faced uncertainty about job cuts. The federal government's Employee Assistance Program received 42,738 calls from the ranks of Canada's 212,000 public servants over the past year. More

    Mental illness linked to domestic violence
    Futurity    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    People diagnosed with mental illness are more likely than others to be victims of domestic violence, new research shows. Previous studies into the link between domestic violence and mental health problems have mainly focused on depression, but this is the first study to look at a wide range of mental health problems in both men and women. More

    Gun control report: Professionals should report violent threats
    The Gazette    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    A Maryland state task force is recommending that the General Assembly pass legislation to require physicians and counselors to report violent threats to local law enforcement and Maryland State Police, as part of the process for determining whether an individual should be granted a license to own a regulated firearm. The Task Force to Study Access of Individuals with Mental Illness to Firearms, created in the 2012 regular session, was looking into whether changes should be made to regulations in an effort to keep guns out of the hands of potentially violent individuals with mental illness. More



    Court: Death threat does not warrant workers' compensation benefits
    Business Insurance    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    It's highly unusual for a supervisor to threaten to kill an employee, but that is not enough to award a police officer workers' compensation benefits, a Louisiana appeals court ruled. The Louisiana 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeal ruling in Troy Franklin v. Slidell Police Department affirmed a workers' comp judge's December 2011 dismissal of a former police department correction officer's claim seeking benefits for a mental injury caused by mental stress. More

    Sandy Hook students return, putting spotlight on need to help
    children cope

    The Christian Science Monitor    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Mental health counselors were just a few steps away when children started school the new Sandy Hook Elementary School location. But for thousands of students across America who have lost a loved one recently, help with grief is not so easy to come by. About 7 out of 10 teachers report having a student who has lost a parent, guardian, sibling, or close friend in the past year, according to an early December survey. Yet 93 percent of teachers say they've never received training on how to support bereaved students. More

    Study: Workplace stress leads to fewer sick days taken in 2012
    Chief Learning Officer    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development recently commissioned a study on absence levels in the workplace, finding that average sick days for working people have fallen from 7.7 a year to 6.8 a year per employee. However, the argument is not that people are healthier nowadays, but people are putting up with more in the name of job security. More

    Report: Work has positive impact on mental health of young people
    Health Insurance & Protection    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    The positive contribution that work makes to the mental health of young people is outlined in a report published recently. A survey of more than 2,000 16- to 25-year-olds reveals that young people not in employment, education or training are significantly more vulnerable to mental ill health than their peers who are in work. More



    Mental health advocates call on Texas legislators to increase funding
    for mental illness treatment

    The Dallas Morning News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Dallas-area mental health advocates gathered recently with County Commissioner John Wiley Price to push Texas legislators to provide more funding for local mental illness and substance abuse treatment. Texas ranks 49th, above Idaho, in mental health funding, spending $38.99 per person compared to the national average of $125, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. More

    Nonclinical approaches to mental health
    Personnel Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Typically, doctors and employers will first consider counseling or other "talking therapies" for people who are off work with stress, anxiety or depression. The conventional wisdom is that such interventions will offer the best chance for a return to work. The experience from Leicestershire's Fit for Work pilots, established in 2010 as part of the response to Dame Carol Black's 2008 report Working for a healthier tomorrow, suggests that the obstacles for a return to work are usually a complex mix of practical and emotional problems. More

    Is it ever OK to cry at the office?
    Fortune    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    For about 1 in 4 people (both men and women), tears are an automatic biological response to highly stressful situations. So why are they still taboo? More

    How to make a workplace wellness program stick
    Successful Meetings    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Workplace wellness programs work, benefiting both employers and employees. Unfortunately, implementing workplace wellness programs isn't always easy, according to Alliance for a Healthier Minnesota, which found that concerns about cost (65 percent), participation (59 percent) and time (54 percent) keep many organizations from implementing them. More


     



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