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Table of Contents
  • In the aftermath of Sandy Hook
  • 2013 Annual World EAP Conference 'Call for Proposals' open through Feb. 8
  • The next step for wellness
  • Gun violence and the mental health system: Why treatment must come first
  • Research cites parallels of debt, depression
  • Canada's workplace mental health guide sets national standard
  • Project Hope targets parental depression and adolescent drug use
  • Survey: Large gaps seen in health perceptions vs. reality
  • Why Latinos need culturally relevant mental health care
  • Rising awareness of employee stress concerns
  • UK's Sickness Absence Review: More industry reaction
  • Union: New Zealand employees overworked as performance targets rise
  • Are children more anxious when moms work nights?
  • The impact of baby boomers working past 65

  • In the aftermath of Sandy Hook
    Human Resources Executive    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    The recent tragedy in Newtown, Conn., has stimulated a broad discussion of gun-control laws and the inadequacy of mental health treatment in the United States. But we'd be remiss were we not to also consider the workplace implications — and the need to provide employees with a safe place to work. More

    2013 World EAP Conference 'Call for Proposals' open through Feb. 8
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    EAPA's 2013 Annual World EAP Conference program planning panel is looking for forward-thinking presentations that highlight innovative ideas and practices in the post-recession environment. A special emphasis is on evidence-based practices that can be applied in or adapted to EAP settings worldwide. The conference will be held Oct. 16-19, in Phoenix, at the Arizona Biltmore Resort. Presentations should be tailored to the conference theme, "EAP Heats Up: Flourishing into the Future." This year's focus areas are: 1) Crisis, trauma and distress in the workplace; 2) The EAP/affiliate provider partnership; 3) Learning from EAPs in other countries; 4) Making the EAP case: defining and demonstrating the EA value proposition; 5) Weaving the EAP into the fabric of work organizations; and 6) Serving today's individual EAP client. The call for proposals ends Feb. 8. More

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    The next step for wellness
    Human Resources Executive    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    A workplace that offers programs geared toward employees' financial and social well-being, not just their physical health, will lead to better outcomes. Compared to employees who score highly in well-being measures, employees with low well-being have four times the odds of visiting the ER, and are 4.1 times likelier to have short-term disability days and 2.2 times likelier to have high claims costs. These employees are also significantly less likely than their high well-being counterparts to be top performers or to stay with the company. More

    Gun violence and the mental health system: Why treatment
    must come first

    Forbes    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Mental health issues have become central in discussions about how to reduce gun violence. Driving the discussions are questions about balancing treatment for the suffering with reporting potential bad actors: Can someone be both a psychotherapist and a gun cop? More

    Research cites parallels of debt, depression
    Chicago Tribune    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Lawrence Berger, a University of Wisconsin at Madison associate professor of social work, has found that when the dollar amount of a person's debt increases by 10 percent, depressive symptoms increase by 14 percent. The cruel debt — the debt that brings people down — tends to be short-term debt, like credit cards or payday loans that can snowball. And it especially weighs on people ages 51 to 64, Berger said. More



    Canada's workplace mental health guide sets national standard
    CBC    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Canadian employers and unions wishing to promote mental health in the workplace can now turn to a new national standard to help boost the well-being of employees. In Toronto, federal Labour Minister Lisa Raitt, the Mental Health Commission of Canada, the Canadian Standards Association and Quebec's standards development body launched the voluntary standard on psychological health and safety in the workplace. More

    Project Hope targets parental depression and adolescent drug use
    Good Therapy    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    When parents are depressed, they are less able to parent effectively, are less engaged with their children and are unavailable to provide emotional and physical support. This increases the risk of psychological problems for the children. More

    Survey: Large gaps seen in health perceptions vs. reality
    Employee Benefit News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    A new survey indicates that many American workers and their families — even those who know what it takes to get and stay healthy — have inaccurate perceptions about their own weight, condition and the cost of their health care. The survey results, released recently by Aon Hewitt, the National Business Group on Health and The Futures Company, further indicate satisfaction and claims of positive behavior changes associated with participation in consumer-driven health plans. More



    Why Latinos need culturally relevant mental health care
    VOXXI    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Latinos, as one of the largest and fastest growing minority populations in the country, are of particular focus when it comes to the area of mental health. With the Latino population in the U.S expected to triple by the year 2050, and the inclination of Latinos to shy away from mental health services, experts are placing an emphasis on the need for culturally relevant mental health care. More

    Rising awareness of employee stress concerns
    Forbes    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    It's not surprising that weight loss has grabbed the top spot of concern for employees in 2013, but right behind it, is stress. The awareness of "stress concern" has jumped from 18 percent in 2012 to 26 percent in 2013. More

    UK's Sickness Absence Review: More industry reaction
    Health Insurance & Protection    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    The British health and risk industry has broadly welcomed the government's response to the Sickness Absence Review, but cautions that the most crucial decision — on tax relief for back-to-work-interventions — has yet to be made. Recently the government published its long-awaited response to the recommendations set out in a state-commissioned paper on sickness absence in 2011. The review proposed that employer-funded private medical insurance for basic rate taxpayers should attract tax relief, and that employers should be able to refer employees who take more than four weeks' absence to an independent assessment and occupational health advice service. More



    Union: New Zealand employees overworked as performance targets rise
    The New Zealand Herald    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    New Zealand's employees are being overworked to the point where they need counseling or take stress leave because bosses are ramping up performance targets to save hiring new staff, union officials say. The latest Employment Trends report says almost a third of all employers (30.8 percent) consider enhancing existing staff performance and productivity as their top priorities this year. More

    Are children more anxious when moms work nights?
    Good Therapy    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Rachel Dunifon of the Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University in New York recently conducted a study that looked at how mothers' nighttime work schedules affected their children. She based her research on a sample of 2,367 low-income mothers and their preschool-age children who were part of a larger study called the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Survey. More

    The impact of baby boomers working past 65
    U.S. News & World Report    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Today, reaching age 65 does not automatically mean it's time to retire. Staying in the workforce past traditional retirement age will have broad implications for employers, younger workers and the economy. More


     



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