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Table of Contents
  • Why don't employees use EAP services?
  • In texting era, crisis hotlines put help at youths' fingertips
  • Study: Treatment for depression affects heart attack risk
  • Job satisfaction and wellness programs: Cause and effect
  • Promising research explores new treatment for PTSD
  • Risk of depression may rise with too much or too little sleep
  • Evaluating wellness in the workplace an elusive goal for most employers
  • Talk therapy effectively replaces antipsychotic drugs as schizophrenia treatment
  • Participation in social media correlated with lower national suicide rates
  • Focus on family-caregiver discrimination growing
  • Many bipolar patients take multiple psychiatric meds

  • Why don't employees use EAP services?
    Psychology Today
    There are really four reasons why employees don't use EAP, listed in the order of frequency that they're referenced: workers don't think information is confidential; they feel there is a stigma for reaching out for help (especially for some men, who see this as a weakness); they think they have to ask permission from their boss or HR; or they don't know it exists. The article addresses each of the topics.
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    In texting era, crisis hotlines put help at youths' fingertips
    The New York Times
    While counseling by phone remains far more prevalent, texting has become such a fundamental way to communicate, particularly among people under 20, that crisis groups have begun to adopt it as an alternative way of providing emergency services and counseling.
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    Study: Treatment for depression affects heart attack risk
    Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis via HealthCanal
    Research at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is the first to find that treatment of depression before any apparent signs of cardiovascular disease can decrease the risk of future heart attacks and strokes by almost half. The researchers followed 235 older, clinically depressed patients who were randomly assigned to standard care or to a collaborative care program involving antidepressants and psychotherapy.
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    Job satisfaction and wellness programs: Cause and effect
    Employee Benefit News
    Research shows that employees who work for businesses with wellness initiatives say they like their jobs more — 67 percent believe their employers take care of them. The same percentage say they're extremely or very likely to recommend their workplace to others.
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    Promising research explores new treatment for PTSD
    The Dallas Morning News
    Preliminary research by a psychologist at the Dallas VA Medical Center suggests doctors may one day be able to cure soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder by simply erasing fears from their minds. Think of it as opening a document — a traumatic memory — on your computer, changing several lines of text, then saving the new file to your hard drive. For traumatized veterans, they’ll still be able to remember battlefield experiences, but the thoughts won’t invoke panic.
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    Risk of depression may rise with too much or too little sleep
    HealthDay News
    Too much or too little sleep can increase the risk of depression, according to two new studies. Inappropriate amounts of sleep may activate depression-related genes, researchers report in the journal Sleep. Ensuring that patients get optimum levels of sleep may be one way to boost the effectiveness of treatments for depression, said a lead investigator.
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    Evaluating wellness in the workplace an elusive goal for most employers
    Workforce
    Surprisingly, with the push for data-driven results, it's still an elusive goal for most employers to measure the value of wellness. While about 80 percent of companies with more than 1,000 employees offer wellness programs, more than half of these companies do not measure their return on investment, according to a 2012 survey by Automatic Data Processing Inc.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        US shows some improvements in behavioral health (Counseling Today)
    Study: Marijuana use may predispose offspring to drug addiction (WLNY-TV)
    Study: Stress reduces when shared (Medical News Today)
    EAP a good starting point for companies to explore improvement (The Globe and Mail)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    Talk therapy effectively replaces antipsychotic drugs as schizophrenia treatment
    Medical Daily
    A new study suggests cognitive therapy might provide a safe and effective alternative to the antipsychotic drugs that as many as half of people with schizophrenia eschew to avoid side effects that range from discomforting to deadly. Previous research has shown cognitive therapy effective only in combination with drugs but not alone, says investigator Anthony Morrison, a professor at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom.
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    Participation in social media correlated with lower national suicide rates
    PsychCentral
    New international research suggests participation in online social media can reduce suicide rates, especially in countries rife with corruption. Researchers hypothesize that social media provides citizens an escape from the everyday problems that dominate corrupt countries.
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    Focus on family-caregiver discrimination growing
    Human Resource Executive
    With aging baby boomers still lingering in the workplace, a growing number of them caring for elderly and ailing parents, and with the federal government — namely the U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission — continuing to step up policing efforts against family and caregiver responsibility discrimination, attention to this segment of employment law is intensifying. The number of employees claiming they were treated unequally because of their caregiver status rose by nearly 400 percent in recent years, according to the The Center for WorkLife Law at the University of California Hastings College of the Law.
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    Many bipolar patients take multiple psychiatric meds
    HealthDay News
    Many people with bipolar disorder take multiple medications to manage the symptoms, which can be extremely challenging, a new study reveals. Researchers looked at 230 patients with bipolar disorder who were admitted to a Rhode Island psychiatric hospital in 2010. They found that more than half of patients were taking three or more psychiatric medications and 36 percent were taking four or more.
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