This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version   RSS   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Feb. 12, 2013

Home   About EAPA   Join   CEAP Certification   Contact Us  

 



Table of Contents
  • Benefits consultants predict a new era for EAPs
  • Study: Most people in addiction treatment do not receive evidence-based care
  • Mental illness adversely affecting Canada's economic potential
  • Impending rules will guide equality for mental health
  • Could scalp electrodes switch off depression?
  • Imaging helps predict anxiety patients who may benefit from CBT
  • Study seeks biomarkers for PTSD
  • Canadian groups seek law to aid first responders with PTSD
  • Senate group votes to boost mental health services
  • On FMLA's 20th anniversary, employers reiterate reservations, advocates urge expansion
  • Fair Work changes coming in Australia, but business hesitant
  • Stressed-out Americans want help, but many don't get it
  • Study: Millennials are America's most stressed-out generation

  • Benefits consultants predict a new era for EAPs
    Employee Benefit Adviser    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    With recent events like Newtown and Superstorm Sandy coupled with health reform and new approaches to crisis management, benefits consultants believe it's time to take a closer look at employee assistance programs. More

    Study: Most people in addiction treatment do not receive
    evidence-based care

    The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    A groundbreaking report published by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University concluded that "the vast majority of people in need of addiction treatment do not receive anything that approximates evidence-based care." The report added, "Only a small fraction of individuals receive interventions or treatment consistent with scientific knowledge about what works." More

    ARE YOU AN EAP PROVIDER?
    Boost your EAP Provider position and create a decided edge in your renewals and sales! Communicate confidence in your EAP services by having an EAP SURVEY conducted for your clients, by an independent, third party EAP professional group. Be proactive. Completely online, confidential, comprehensive (over 200 sequenced questions) and inexpensive. www.EAPSurveys.com


    Mental illness adversely affecting Canada's economic potential
    Edmonton Journal    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    With its recent announcement of a national standard to help businesses put in place policies that improve employees' psychological health, Canada highlighted what many had long suspected: There are far too many Canadians with mental illness for the business community to ignore them. More

    Impending rules will guide equality for mental health
    USA Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Regulations to be issued on the type of mental health coverage insurers must provide under the 2010 health care law may elevate mental illness to the status it needs, mental health experts say. Mental health parity means that issues such as depression or schizophrenia would be treated for as long as necessary, much as a broken arm is treated until it is healed, rather than having limits on allowed visits per year or insurance policies that don't include mental health at all. More



    Could scalp electrodes switch off depression?
    ABC News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Some depression sufferers are getting relief — in the form of tiny, current-emitting scalp electrodes that a new study suggests may offer promise in the treatment of depression. In the study, which was released recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers in Brazil tested a technique known as transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS for short. More

    Imaging helps predict anxiety patients who may benefit from CBT
    Psychiatric News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Neuroimaging may prove useful for predicting which patients with social anxiety disorder are likely to gain the most benefit from cognitive-behavioral therapy, suggests a study reported in JAMA Psychiatry. The study was headed by Oliver Doehrmann, Ph.D., of the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. More

    Study seeks biomarkers for PTSD
    The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Over the past decade, about half a million veterans have received diagnoses of PTSD or traumatic brain injury. Yet underlying the growing numbers lies a disconcerting question: How many of those diagnoses are definitive? Now, in one of the largest studies of its kind, a team of researchers based out of New York University's medical school have begun a five-year study to find biological signals, known as biomarkers, that could provide reliable, objective evidence of those so-called invisible injuries of war. More



    Canadian groups seek law to aid first responders with PTSD
    Winnipeg Free Press    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Manitoba, Canada, emergency services unions are calling on the provincial government to adopt a law — much like Alberta's new legislation — that recognizes post-traumatic stress disorder in firefighters, police and peace officers and emergency medical technicians. The law means if a doctor or psychologist diagnoses one of these workers with PTSD, it's "presumed" it's due to what happened in the course of the job, "unless the contrary is proven." More

    Senate group votes to boost mental health services
    USA Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    A bipartisan group of senators introduced a bill that would expand and improve the availability of mental health services for people with mental illnesses in the hopes of addressing yet another issue tied to the gun-control debate. Seven senators sponsored the bill that would implement new services and accountability standards for community mental health centers. More

    On FMLA's 20th anniversary, employers reiterate reservations,
    advocates urge expansion

    Bloomberg BNA    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Twenty years in, employers still have many concerns with the Family and Medical Leave Act, representatives of the Society for Human Resource Management and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce said. Meantime, lawmakers, the Labor Department, and work and family advocates marked the 20th anniversary of the signing of the federal leave law with the release of a report on the use of FMLA leave and renewed calls for paid leave initiatives. More



    Fair Work changes coming in Australia, but business hesitant
    Smart Company    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Small business has expressed its hesitation over the Australian government's planned expansion of flexible workplace laws, saying they could threaten the viability of businesses in certain industries and place undue pressure on struggling businesses. Prime Minister Julia Gillard said she would deliver more information about changes to flexible work legislation, but reports indicate the changes will extend the ability for workers to request flexible work arrangements. More

    Stressed-out Americans want help, but many don't get it
    NPR    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    More than half of Americans say they get little or no help managing stress from their providers of health care, according to the annual Stress in America survey from the American Psychological Association. The group surveys about 2,000 adults across the country each year. The latest findings square with other studies that find a quarter of Americans don't have access to mental health care. More

    Study: Millennials are America's most stressed-out generation
    GlobalPost    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Sure, Americans are a stressed-out bunch, but it seems that the millennial generation has it the worst. A new study by the American Psychological Association, "Stress in America: Missing the Health Care Connection," has found that young adults aged 18 to 34 have a higher average rate of stress than the U.S. population — 5.4 out of 10 compared to the nation's 4.9. More


     



    EAP NewsBrief

    Colby Horton, Director of Publishing, 469.420.2601
    Download media kit

    Bob Kowalski, Content Editor, 469.420.2650   
    Contribute news

    Please add eapa@multibriefs.com to your address book
    to ensure our emails reach your inbox.
    Also, please be sure to add eapa@multibriefs.com
    to your Outlook junkmail SafeSenders list.


    This edition of the EAP NewsBrief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!

    Recent issues
    Feb. 12, 2013
    Feb. 5, 2013
    Jan. 29, 2013






    7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063