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Table of Contents
  • New ethical dilemmas in an online world
  • Intimate partner violence raises likelihood of later depression
  • Increasing brain acidity may slow down anxiety
  • EAPA members to receive discount for Asia Pacific EA Conference
  • Even when average alcohol consumption is moderate, binge drinking harmful
  • Study: Nearly 1 in 5 had mental illness before enlisting in Army
  • Study: Doctors prescribing more sedatives
  • Duties put enormous stress on firefighters
  • ACA: Health benefit waiting periods capped at 90 days
  • Hearing loss tied to depression in study
  • Prescription drug overdose — Can we be honest?
  • Study: CBT combats depression in care-givers

  • New ethical dilemmas in an online world
    APA Monitor on Psychology
    Psychologists, other therapists and EA professionals increasingly use online social networking sites, just as their clients do. This produces a social networking environment that, in many ways, is similar to rural and small town psychological practice, where the possibility is high for pervasive incidental contact, intentional and unintentional self-disclosure and unavoidable multiple relationships between professional and client. In this environment, practitioners face ethical concerns they may never have considered before.
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    Intimate partner violence raises likelihood of later depression
    American Sociological Association via The Medical News
    Described by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as "physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a current or former partner or spouse," intimate partner violence is a serious public health issue affecting millions of people in the United States. New research from sociologists at Bowling Green State University shows that adolescents and young adults who perpetrate or fall victim to IPV are more likely to experience an increase in symptoms of depression.
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    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword VIOLENCE


    Increasing brain acidity may slow down anxiety
    The Health Site
    Scientists have found a new target to treat anxiety disorder. Increasing acidity in the brain's emotional control center can reduce anxiety, according to a new research. At the cellular level, anxiety disorders are associated with heightened activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the brain which is known to play a central role in emotional behavior.
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    EAPA members to receive discount for Asia Pacific EA Conference
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association
    For the first time ever, the Asia Pacific Employee Assistance Roundtable (APEAR) Conference is offering discounted member pricing to all EAPA members. The conference this year will be held in Melbourne, Australia, on May 8-9. Focus of the conference is on integrating EAP and wellbeing services into the workplace culture. EAPA CEO, John Maynard, will be presenting the opening keynote on workplace change and its impact on EAPs. Early Bird registration is available now.
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    Even when average alcohol consumption is moderate, binge drinking harmful
    Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research via Medical News Today
    Numerous studies have highlighted the purported association between moderate drinking and reduced mortality. However, these analyses have focused overwhelmingly on average consumption, a measure that masks diverse, underlying drinking patterns such as weekend heavy episodic or binge drinking.
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    Study: Nearly 1 in 5 had mental illness before enlisting in Army
    Los Angeles Times
    Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. soldiers had a common mental illness, such as depression, panic disorder or ADHD, before enlisting in the Army, according to a new study that raises questions about the military's assessment and screening of recruits. More than 8 percent of soldiers had thought about killing themselves and 1.1 percent had a past suicide attempt, researchers found from confidential surveys and interviews with 5,428 soldiers at Army installations across the country.
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    Study: Doctors prescribing more sedatives
    HealthDay News
    Doctors in the United States are writing more prescriptions for sedatives than ever before, and the frequent use of these powerful drugs in combination with narcotic painkillers may be causing medication-related deaths, a new study suggests. Patients who received narcotic painkiller prescriptions were 4.2 times more likely to also have sedative prescriptions, and the number of joint prescriptions of opioids and benzodiazepines rose 12 percent a year, the Stanford University researchers said.
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    Duties put enormous stress on firefighters
    Fire Chief
    Being an emergency responder is stressful, and it's not just about the calls. But those calls can take their toll. Studies show that overall, about 15 percent of all firefighters will develop symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder during their careers. How they get through stressful events is something individuals and departments can contribute to in a positive way.
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    ACA: Health benefit waiting periods capped at 90 days
    Business Management
    Employer-sponsored group health plans cannot impose waiting periods that exceed 90 days after an employee is otherwise eligible for insurance coverage under a final Affordable Care Act rule issued recently by the Obama administration. The rules don't require coverage be offered to any particular individual or class of individuals, and other conditions for eligibility are generally permissible, such as meeting sales goals, earning a certain level of commission or completing an orientation period.
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    Hearing loss tied to depression in study
    HealthDay News
    Hearing loss is associated with depression among American adults, especially women and those younger than age 70, according to new research. In the new study, as hearing declined, the percentage of depressed adults increased — from about 5 percent in those who had no hearing problems to more than 11 percent in those who did.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
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        The growing presence of employer-sponsored medical clinics — is there a role for EAPs? (International Society of Certified Employee Benefit Specialists)
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    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    Prescription drug overdose — Can we be honest?
    By Jason Poquette
    Some topics tend to generate more heat than light, and prescription drug overdose is one of them. Type in the word “addiction” or “overdose” into any news search engine, and you will quickly have a list of articles longer than the half-life of methadone to manage. And this isn't surprising. The number of deaths attributed to drug overdose in America is climbing; approximately 40,000 per year, according to Dr. Robert Pearl in a recent article posted online at Forbes.com. This is a serious issue, and many readers may personally know the tragedy associated with prescription drug overdose.
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    Study: CBT combats depression in care-givers
    University of Exeter via Medical Xpress
    Psychologists from the University of Exeter are trialling an innovative new type of support to help relatives and friends who care for stroke survivors – with studies showing that currently 1 in 3 become depressed or suffer other mental health problems. Many survivors will need care from a relative or friend, but providing this help places the carer at a greater risk of poor mental and physical health, while also taking away employment and social opportunities. Care-givers often do not seek support because they feel guilty or are afraid the person they care for will be taken away.
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