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Table of Contents
  • Dealing with an addiction in the office down the hall
  • Doctors encourage physicians to give mental evaluations with physicals
  • How Alzheimer's will change the workplace
  • Gun background check database missing vital information
  • 'Serendipitous interaction' key to tech firms' workplace design
  • 4 companies recognized for having psychologically healthy workplace
  • Half of employers believe they should look after staff
  • Counseling stressed staff costs BBC as sick days soar
  • Researchers use emails to track obesity at workplace
  • Poor eating behaviors can worsen mood
  • Backstabbing in the workplace: Beware the Ides of March
  • The truth about law enforcement mental health

  • Dealing with an addiction in the office down the hall
    The Lawyers Weekly
    Canada's legal community, unlike some segments of society, doesn't ignore addiction issues. The Law Society of Upper Canada, for example, brought a new provider of a confidential assistance program on board Jan. 1. Funded by the Law Society, the EAP will provide support to lawyers and paralegals in Ontario who are experiencing a professional or personal crisis.
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    Doctors encourage physicians to give mental evaluations with physicals
    Counsel & Heal
    Doctors state that the brain should be treated like any other organ in the body, and it should be evaluated along with other organs. According to a new study, a mental health checkup for anyone, regardless of age, gender and risk factors, could benefit overall life quality, and physicians should administer them and patients should ask for them.
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    How Alzheimer's will change the workplace
    U.S. News & World Report
    A recent survey showed that 15 percent of American workers either are or have been caregivers for people with Alzheimer's or other types of dementia, and nearly half of those people say they were able to keep working while caring for their loved ones. And with baby boomers now in their 50s and early 60s, the phenomenon is likely to grow.
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    Gun background check database missing vital information
    McClatchy Newspapers
    Even as lawmakers look for ways to curb gun violence, the federal government and various states haven't sent millions of mental health and drug abuse records to the database that's designed to keep firearms from people who are barred from owning them, according to recent studies. A host of logistical problems — including concerns about violating privacy, misunderstandings about which records should be submitted and a lack of money and training — has left the National Instant Criminal Background Check System without the information that's necessary to prevent guns from ending up in dangerous hands.
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    'Serendipitous interaction' key to tech firms' workplace design
    NPR
    Google has spent a lot of time studying what makes workplaces innovative and casual interactions are important. John Sullivan, a management professor at San Francisco State University and workplace consultant, lists three factors to make that set companies apart: learning by interaction, collaborations and fun. "Most people just don't get that," he says.
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    4 companies recognized for having psychologically healthy workplace
    Fox News
    It may be no surprise that a company's values and its corporate culture can have a huge impact on the level of stress of its employees. But the American Psychological Association's Psychologically Healthy Workplace Program has provided some great examples of this theory in action.
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    Half of employers believe they should look after staff
    Employee Benefits
    More than half (52 percent) of employer respondents believe they have an obligation to look after their employees and aim to reflect this in the benefits package, according to research by Unum. Research found that 36 percent of employer respondents said they it is better for their employees to obtain financial benefits through workplace schemes, rather than on an individual basis.
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    Counseling stressed staff costs BBC as sick days soar
    London Evening Standard
    The BBC spent more than $196,000 on counseling for its staff last year as stress-related absences soared, new figures show. The corporation said license fee payers' money also went towards providing staff with advice to deal with issues such as relationships, "life events," family issues, immigration, debt and consumer rights.
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    Researchers use emails to track obesity at workplace
    CBS News
    A study of workplace emails found a strong link between the frequency coworkers emailed each other and body mass index, a measure used to determine obesity. The analysis of emails found obese co-workers were more likely to email each other.
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    Poor eating behaviors can worsen mood
    Psych Central
    New research suggests turning to food to ease stress and/or improve mood may be counterproductive as researchers discover mood may actually worsen after unhealthy eating choices for women who are concerned about their diet and self-image. Penn State researchers studied college-age women who were concerned about their eating behaviors and discovered that moods worsened after bouts of disordered eating.
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    Backstabbing in the workplace: Beware the Ides of March
    Business Management Daily
    More than 80 percent of U.S. workers say they've been lied to, stolen from, cheated or treated dishonestly by a supervisor or a co-worker, according to a Hogan Assessment Systems survey of 700 people. On the flip side, when people were asked about the most important qualities of their all-time favorite boss, the No. 1 characteristic (cited by 81 percent of people) was trustworthiness. Conversely, 50 percent described their worst boss as manipulative.
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    The truth about law enforcement mental health
    By Louise Pyers
    A recent study indicates police and other first responders are susceptible to mood and substance-use disorders. And those mood disorders are directly related to on-the-job exposure to traumatic and other stressful events. Police and other first responders have the potential to be exposed to traumatic events much more often than those in civilian life. No one is immune to the symptoms that can occur after a traumatic event. Some of these events would test the coping mechanisms of anyone. The symptoms are a normal response to an abnormal event.
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