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Table of Contents
  • Chinese EA professionals offer comfort, support during Malaysian Air mystery — EAPA exclusive
  • Is there a need for a mental health standard in the workplace?
  • Comparing impact of well-being, disease status on employee productivity
  • Irish study: 1 in 4 suffered harm because of another person's drinking
  • Workplace bullying increasing employer costs in US
  • Medical marijuana research for PTSD clears major hurdle
  • UK effort: Tackling workplace health will improve GDP and boost bottom line
  • Banker deaths leave industry concerned about workplace culture
  • First trial of LSD as medicine in 40 years shows promise
  • Employers hold key to integrating work-life balance
  • Australian survey: 1 in 4 think depressed people are a danger to others

  • Chinese EA professionals offer comfort, support during Malaysian Air mystery — EAPA exclusive
    The Employee Assistance Professionals Association
    The Malaysian Air mystery seems to have captivated the entire globe. But while millions are glued to TV and Internet news looking for the latest information about the disappearance of Flight MH 370, families of the airliner's passengers and crew are gripped by worry, fear and anxiety as they look for answers about what happened to their loved ones. Paul Yin and Grace Ding, Certified Employee Assistance Professionals in China, are intimately involved in helping survivors and others affected by the incident. On March 20, Paul and Grace took some time out of their hectic schedules to share with the Journal of Employee Assistance how they are helping family members and others as perhaps the most unusual critical incident in recent memory continues to unfold.
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    Is there a need for a mental health standard in the workplace?
    The Globe and Mail
    The author writes: "As leader of one of the organizations responsible for development of the world’s first national standard for psychological health and safety in the workplace, I have heard a lot of feedback over the past year. Most of it revolves around one key question: Do businesses really need a standard for workplace mental health?"
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    Comparing impact of well-being, disease status on employee productivity
    Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
    A study was performed to compare employee overall well-being to chronic disease status, which has a long-established relationship to productivity, as relative contributors to on-the-job productivity. Longitudinally, changes in well-being contributed to changes in productivity above and beyond what could be explained by the presence of chronic disease or other fixed characteristics.
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    Irish study: 1 in 4 suffered harm because of another person's drinking
    The Independent
    A Health Service Executive study revealed that a quarter of Ireland's population — about 1.1 million people — have experienced some harm due to another person's drinking. Some 28 percent of people have experienced at least one negative consequences as a result of alcohol, including family problems, being a passenger with a drunk driver, assault, vandalism and money problems.
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    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ALCOHOL


    Workplace bullying increasing employer costs in US
    Insurance Business
    A 2014 Workplace Bullying Institute survey shows that nearly a third of Americans have suffered serious bullying at work, and other 21 percent have witnessed it. That's an increase from 15 percent just a year before, and is costing U.S. employers more than $4 billion annually — including in a wide variety of insurance claims.
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    Medical marijuana research for PTSD clears major hurdle
    USA Today
    A researcher at the University of Arizona is a step closer to studying how medical marijuana affects veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. Although there is a "mountain of anecdotal evidence" that marijuana helps with PTSD, there has been no controlled trial to test how marijuana suppresses the symptoms, including flashbacks, insomnia and anxiety, said Suzanne Sisley, the study's lead researcher.
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    UK effort: Tackling workplace health will improve GDP and boost bottom line
    Industry Today
    Senior business figures gathered in London for the launch of a major new health report were told that workplace sickness is costing the U.K. economy 4.5 percent of annual GDP1. The launch was part of a campaign spearheaded by the City of London Corporation, which is tackling issues around employee health and well-being and establishing best practice across the country. Mental health was identified as a real issue due to the stigma associated with the issue and this must be tackled at board room level.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Is a Comprehensive Service Program model the future of EAP? (Taylor & Francis)
    To drink or not to drink: Decision-making center of brain identified (University of Georgia via ScienceDaily)
    Survey: 80 percent of Japanese employees say work affected by personal problems (The International EAP Research Institute)
    US workplaces lose 172 million work days yearly to depression (Everyday Health)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    Banker deaths leave industry concerned about workplace culture
    Bloomberg
    Coroners in London are preparing to investigate two apparent suicides as unexpected deaths by finance workers around the world have raised concerns about mental health and stress levels in the industry. The financial world's aggressive, hard-working culture may be hurting itself, professionals advising on mental health in the industry say.
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    First trial of LSD as medicine in 40 years shows promise
    Los Angeles Times
    For the first time in more than four decades, the drug lysergic acid diethylamide — better known as LSD — has been the experimental adjunct to psychotherapy in a controlled clinical trial approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. And a newly published study on that trial reports that the medication's anti-anxiety effects on patients facing life-threatening illnesses were sizable, sustained — and free of worrisome side effects.
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    Employers hold key to integrating work-life balance
    The Telegraph
    According to Deloitte's 2014 study of human capital trends, 75 percent of business leaders say that the challenge of overwhelmed employees is urgent or important (or both). Almost half also admit that they are not even "somewhat" ready to deal with it.
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    Australian survey: 1 in 4 think depressed people are a danger to others
    The Sydney Morning Herald
    Discriminating attitudes toward people with a mental illness have decreased over the past decade, but many Australians still believe people with depression are dangerous, "weak-willed" and have themselves to blame for their condition. Beyondblue's depression monitor, a survey of about 3,000 Australians conducted every two to three years, has found that while awareness campaigns seem to be reducing stigma, a significant number of Australians do not understand depression and anxiety.
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