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Table of Contents
  • Simple test may be predictive of addiction treatment success
  • New maps may hold clues to brain mysteries
  • Stanford professor: Toxic workplaces override wellness efforts
  • Troubling issue of suicide featured in upcoming JEA
  • Work-home interference contributes to burnout
  • Phone attachment linked with mental health stress
  • UK employers feel pressure from young fathers for flexibility
  • Evidence-based resiliency programs adapted to help military families
  • Is being positive hardwired?
  • Party drug ketamine could help treat severe depression

  • Simple test may be predictive of addiction treatment success
    Virginia Tech University via WSLS-TV
    Drug-dependent people who least take the future into account may, paradoxically, be the ones to benefit the most from certain treatments. An important component of addiction is failure to exert self-control in recognition of future consequences. In a study in Clinical Psychological Science, a team of researchers has found an unexpected pattern that may provide hope for tailoring addiction treatments.
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    New maps may hold clues to brain mysteries
    CNN
    Two studies released recently in the journal Nature showcase brain maps that could have implications for understanding both healthy and impaired brains. One study reveals the most complete map ever of how parts of the brain are connected in a mouse. The other illuminates the developing human brain in terms of genetic expression — specifically, which genes are responsible for generating different types of neurons, and how brain circuits are formed.
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    Stanford professor: Toxic workplaces override wellness efforts
    Employee Benefit News
    Health and wellness programs are virtually meaningless if a workplace culture is bad, according to Jeffrey Pfeffer, a professor of organizational behavior at Stanford University's graduate school of business. Pfeffer said that unhealthy workplaces can cause up to 125,000 employee deaths each year and add up to $130 billion in excess annual company costs.
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    Troubling issue of suicide featured in upcoming JEA
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association
    Distinct approaches to address the problem of suicide in the workplace are featured in the upcoming 2nd Quarter, 2014, issue of the Journal of Employee Assistance. One particularly innovative program takes a bold unapologetic stance to reach men most vulnerable for risk of suicide. Another article features a major university study that seeks to understand better which interventions most positively impact suicide on its campus. A third article examines EAP response to suicide in Japan. Besides receiving the print version of the Journal by mail every quarter, EAPA members also have free online access to a complete electronic reproduction of the print version, as well as a key word searchable "html" online version. Every past issue of the Journal through 2005 is electronically archived and available as an EAPA members-only benefit on EAPA's website at http://www.eapassn.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=901.
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    Work-home interference contributes to burnout
    American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine via Newswise
    Conflicts between work and home — in both directions — are an important contributor to the risk of burnout, suggests a study in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Dr Victoria Blom of Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, and colleagues evaluated the relationship between work-home interference and burnout risk in a study of nearly 4,500 Swedish twins. Twin studies provide unique information on familial factors — genetics and early life experiences — affecting health and illness.
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    Phone attachment linked with mental health stress
    Science Network WA via Medical Xpress
    A study of smart devices and mental health found depression and stress are more likely in people who have high "involvement" with mobile phones and tablets. This includes the extent to which people are aware of where their phone is at all times, use it for no reason or feel disconnected if they cannot access it.
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    UK employers feel pressure from young fathers for flexibility
    HR Magazine
    U.K. employers are being urged to respond to a growing resentment among young fathers who feel they are being unfairly treated when it comes to flexible working. Their dissatisfaction is highlighted in Working Families' recent report Time, Health and the Family. According to almost one-third (31 percent) of parents, flexible working is currently unavailable to them, with education, retail and healthcare the three sectors least likely to offer it.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Study measures causal relationship between EAPs, improved outcomes (Employee Benefit Adviser)
    Exploring how men and women respond to stress (Good Therapy)
    Congress poised to pass major new mental health legislation (ThinkProgress)
    Why heroin is spreading in America's suburbs (The Christian Science Monitor)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    Evidence-based resiliency programs adapted to help military families
    American Psychological Association
    A tailored treatment program is just one example of the ways psychologists are adapting resiliency treatments to help military families and couples. The programs share several features: They are evidence-based, they are often tweaked from interventions already shown to work with other populations, and they are standardized across sites, so if families move — as military families often do — they can reconnect with the program right where they left off.
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    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword RESILIENCY




    Is being positive hardwired?
    PsychCentral
    New research may provide an explanation of the paradoxical behavior of postive and negative indiduals as researchers discover both the ability to stay positive when times get tough — and, conversely, of being negative — may have genetic roots. A study led by Michigan State University psychologist Dr. Jason Moser is the first to provide biological evidence suggesting there are positive and negative thinkers.
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    Party drug ketamine could help treat severe depression
    Fox News
    The party drug ketamine could one day be used to help some people suffering from severe depression, according to British scientists who gave infusions of the narcotic nicknamed "special K" to patients. Researchers who tested the drug on 28 people with major depressive disorder found ketamine quickly helped relieve the condition for some — and made a number of them completely well again for up to several weeks.
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