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Text Version   RSS   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit April 14, 2015

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Table of Contents
  • EAPA CEO to retire Dec. 31 — EAPA seeks search committee member at large
  • Psychological impact of unemployment could have long-lasting effect
  • OSHA issues guidelines to reduce the risk of violence in healthcare settings
  • Is your employer killing you?
  • Years out of prison, but still out of work
  • Research enables profiling of addicts with concurrent violent behavior and/or criminal history
  • Young people aren't good at shaking off work stress
  • Working through depression: Many stay on the job, despite mental illness
  • Anxiety overlooked workplace issue
  • 5 hallmarks of successful corporate wellness programs

  • EAPA CEO to retire Dec. 31 — EAPA seeks search committee member at large
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association
    In anticipation of John Maynard's upcoming retirement from EAPA's CEO position on Dec. 31, EAPA's Board of Directors has begun planning a search and selection process for his successor. The board will be appointing a search committee, which will begin meeting in July to benchmark needed skills and experience, conduct a search and develop a recommendation on final candidates for approval by the board during or shortly after the World EAP Conference in San Diego. The search committee will include an EAPA "member at large." This member is to serve as a representative for the general membership and may not be a sitting member of the Board of Directors. Anyone interested in being considered for the search committee member at large position must submit a brief resume and one-page letter of interest no later than 5 p.m. EDT, May 1.
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    Psychological impact of unemployment could have long-lasting effect
    Employee Benefit News
    Although the Bureau of Labor Statistics' recent reports on unemployment have showed a steady decline in unemployment over the past four years, recent data from the Journal of Applied Psychology suggest the psychological impact of unemployment could have long-lasting effects on workers that employers should bear in mind when assessing new talent.
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    OSHA issues guidelines to reduce the risk of violence in healthcare settings
    The National Law Review
    OSHA released an update to its Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers. The publication includes industry best practices and provides some insight on how to reduce the risk of violence in various healthcare and social service settings.
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    SPONSORED CONTENT


    Is your employer killing you?
    Fortune
    McDonald's recent decision to raise the pay for workers at company-owned restaurants to an average of $9.90 an hour and provide employees, once they have worked a year, some paid time off made news for what that action says about the tightening labor market and the campaign to get low-paid people a living wage. But pay levels and other working conditions such as vacation and paid sick days affect more than just standards of living. People spend a lot of their time at work and, unsurprisingly, what happens in the workplace profoundly influences people's mental and physical health. So if you think your job may be killing you, recent research suggests you just might be right.
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    Years out of prison, but still out of work
    Al Jazeera America
    The $63 billion a year prison system, housing 2.4 million people at a time in the United States has recently begun to attract the attention of a bipartisan coalition of policymakers and advocates. Groups as diverse as the conservative Koch brothers, known for their generous spending on Republican causes, to the liberal Center for American Progress have joined forces to prompt a re-examination of the criminal justice system. Less prominent are the estimated 65 million people, like Killings, who are no longer behind bars but have criminal records and are hampered in their quest to make a livelihood after being released. Many of them say that a felony conviction of is akin to a different kind of life sentence.
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    PRODUCT SHOWCASE
      Helping Employees Every Day, The Sovereign Way

    Sovereign Health Group is a national treatment provider for Addiction, Dual Diagnosis, and Mental Health for adults and adolescents with support services for the family system. We offer multiple treatment locations in the U.S. and Accept Most Private Insurance. We are experienced in helping Employee Assistance Programs help their employees get the treatment they deserve and need.
     


    Research enables profiling of addicts with concurrent violent behavior and/or criminal history
    Medical Xpress
    The Journal of Addictive Diseases has published a study conducted by researchers in the Department of Psychology and Pedagogy of the NUP/UPVA-Public University of Navarre on the behavior and treatment of patients with addictions. Specifically, the research has enabled profiles of addicted patients to be established in terms of whether they display associated behavior of violence and/or whether they have committed criminal acts. As Prof Raúl Cacho pointed out, "this is very important as it enables us to predict the result of the treatment, and therefore, improve it, so that it is rendered more effective, is adapted to the patient and also leads to savings in terms of human and material resources."
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    Young people aren't good at shaking off work stress
    Bloomberg
    Take a look around your office. The most anxious employees in the room probably aren't the graying bosses — they're likely to be the millennials, new research shows. For a report published on April 1, workplace-services firm Bensinger, DuPont & Associates found that about 30 percent of millennials — people born between 1978 and 1999 — had workplace anxiety, more than any other age group. Among Generation X employees (born between 1965 and 1977), 26 percent reported anxiety. Around the same share of baby boomers (1946-1964) had anxiety on the job — 25 percent.
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      FEATURED COMPANIES
    Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

    Twenty-three percent of the U.S. workforce has used prescription drugs non-medically, according to the National Safety Council. The health care costs are staggering. Learn More
    Suboxone: Escape Herion the Outpatient Way

    Heroin addiction has become an epidemic, especially among younger people. Suboxone (buprenorphine) has no tolerance build-up, produces miraculous reductions of withdrawal symptoms and higher outcomes for long-term recovery from opiates. Learn More


    Working through depression: Many stay on the job, despite mental illness
    NPR
    When a pilot crashed a Germanwings plane into a mountainside on the south of France last month, one word kept coming up over and over in the media coverage: depression. What did the airline know about the pilot's mental health and what was he required to tell them? Of course being depressed is a very different thing from wanting to take the lives of others.
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    Anxiety overlooked workplace issue
    Employee Benefit News
    Today's workforce spans generations and given the pressures of everyday work, employees from different generations will likely experience anxiety, depression and performance issues in very different ways. "While anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in America, affecting more than 40 million adults across the country and contributing to more than $42 billion in health care costs annually, the impact of anxiety in the workplace is often overlooked," says Marie Apke, chief operating officer of Bensinger DuPont & Associates, an employee assistance program provider.
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    5 hallmarks of successful corporate wellness programs
    Fortune
    Most people can get behind the idea that health, happiness, and productivity at work are related concepts, and that companies have an opportunity to foster all three — to everybody's benefit — with a corporate wellness program. But while most companies do "something" to promote employee health and well-being, very few — just 7 percent of companies surveyed in a nationally representative 2008 study — offer what Laura Linnan, a professor of public health at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and head of the CDC-funded Workplace Health Research Network, calls a "comprehensive program."
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        What if my patient is a pilot? (CNN)
    The shrinks who only see CIA officers (The Daily Beast)
    Does your boss have a right to know if you're mentally ill? (Bloomberg)
    EARF issues call for applicants to produce definitive history of EA practice (Employee Assistance Research Foundation)
    Mental illness stigma alive and well (Workplace Savings & Benefits)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
     



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