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Table of Contents
  • Major study: Depression can hike risk of heart failure by 40 percent
  • Research: Customized interventions can reduce workplace mental health issues
  • Brain changes associated with casual marijuana use in young adults
  • Asia Pacific EA Conference (APEAR) offers Easter Special discount to EAPA members
  • Are mental workplace injuries caused by psychological conditions compensable?
  • Why sleep is crucial to any wellness plan
  • 40 years on, bullying takes its toll on health and wealth
  • Creative activities outside work bolster job productivity
  • Prescription drugs said to be endangering US soldiers
  • Late-hour work emailing sends unsettling message

  • Major study: Depression can hike risk of heart failure by 40 percent
    PsychCentral
    Moderate to severe depression increases the risk of heart failure by 40 percent, according to a new study. The study used data collected during the second wave of a large epidemiological study in Nord-Trøndelag county, Norway, called the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study. Nearly 63,000 of the 97,000 residents in the county agreed to take part in the study.
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    Research: Customized interventions can reduce workplace mental health issues
    Benefits Canada
    Researchers at the Université de Montréal, in collaboration with researchers at Concordia University and the Université Laval, interviewed more than 2,100 workers from 63 organizations to analyze both the personal and professional factors that could lead to the development of psychological distress, depression and burnout. They examined different factors — including work schedules and workload, management policies, supervision styles, married and family life, alcohol consumption and self-esteem — which were identified as triggers or inhibitors in the development of psychological distress, depression or burnout.
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    Brain changes associated with casual marijuana use in young adults
    Society for Neuroscience via ScienceDaily
    The size and shape of two brain regions involved in emotion and motivation may differ in young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week, according to a new study. The findings suggest that recreational marijuana use may lead to previously unidentified brain changes and highlight the importance of research aimed at understanding the long-term effects of low to moderate marijuana use on the brain.
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    Asia Pacific EA Conference (APEAR) offers Easter Special discount to EAPA members
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association
    The focus of the Asia Pacific Employee Assistance Roundtable (APEAR) Conference this year is on how to integrate EAP and well-being services into a workplace culture. The conference opening keynote will be presented by EAPA CEO John Maynard, who will examine changes in the workplace that will change EAP. Easter Special discount rates are now available to all EAPA members through 10 p.m. EDT, April 27. The 2014 conference, to be held in Melbourne Australia, on May 8-9, represents a unique opportunity to learn from and share experiences with innovative global and local EA providers from countries throughout the world.
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    Are mental workplace injuries caused by psychological conditions compensable?
    HR.BLR
    As medical knowledge of mental conditions has increased, workers' comp carriers have been faced with the significant dilemma of adhering to a well-documented legal history supporting the denial of benefits for purely psychological conditions or adopting the newly recognized medical stance requiring that such conditions be treated with immediate and appropriate intervention. As the divergence between the legal and medical standards has become more pronounced, several state courts have begun to move away from the traditional ban on mental-mental claims.
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    Why sleep is crucial to any wellness plan
    Employee Benefit News
    Despite an ever-increasing focus on wellness in the workplace, employers often overlook a key contributor to the health and well-being of their employees — sleep. New research shows sleep-deprivation runs rampant in today's workplaces, but gives hope that employers who choose to offer sleep solutions can have a positive impact on the problem, while building a company's culture of health.
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    40 years on, bullying takes its toll on health and wealth
    Reuters
    The negative social, physical and mental health effects of childhood bullying are still evident nearly 40 years later, according to research by British psychiatrists. In the first study of its kind to look at the effects of childhood bullying beyond early adulthood, the researchers said its impact is "persistent and pervasive," with people who were bullied when young more likely to have poorer physical and psychological health and poorer cognitive functioning at age 50.
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    Creative activities outside work bolster job productivity
    Time
    Researchers at San Francisco State University discovered that partaking in creative activities was linked to experiencing mastery, control and relaxation as well as reported positive work performance related outcomes. Why? The researchers are not certain, but it's likely that people learn new skills through their other activities, and these skills may be applied to their daily work.
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    Prescription drugs said to be endangering US soldiers
    International Business Times
    The unprecedented use of prescription drugs by soldiers and veterans began during the second Gulf War and continues unabated today, said Dr. Peter Breggin, a psychiatrist and author who’s written extensively about the potential dangers of the use of psychotropic drugs to treat mental illness among servicemen and servicewomen. He added, "The combination of increasing prescribing of such drugs during and after military service has led to violence and suicide and in many cases to chronic mental disability while being treated at the VA. This becomes a disability from which they often can’t recover because of multiple psychiatric drugs."
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    Late-hour work emailing sends unsettling message
    The Boston Globe
    Even as some American firms boast about policies that encourage workers to unplug — allowing unlimited vacation time, for example, or discouraging after-hours emails — many workers say they are afraid to go offline. The employee who sleeps through a 3 a.m. email risks losing out on business.
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