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Table of Contents
  • Hormone that protects new neurons reduces depression caused by stress
  • Companies face issues of dealing with caregivers
  • 'Social' cocaine use more harmful than thought
  • Absenteeism draws the attention of corporate world
  • Context is key when addressing workplace bullying
  • Respectful workplace policy protects businesses, employees
  • State of the US workplace: Good and bad news
  • Mental health at work: Survey finds 30 percent have problems coping
  • Anxiety makes neurotic people 'afraid of action'

  • Hormone that protects new neurons reduces depression caused by stress
    Iowa Now
    Scientists probing the link between depression and a hormone that controls hunger have found that the hormone's antidepressant activity is due to its ability to protect newborn neurons in a part of the brain that controls mood, memory and complex eating behaviors. Moreover, the researchers also showed that a new class of neuroprotective molecules achieves the same effect by working in the same part of the brain, and may thus represent a powerful new approach for treating depression.
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    Companies face issues of dealing with caregivers
    Financial Post
    The term "caregiver" may sound noble, but caregiving is beginning to take its toll on Canada's workforce. The role caregivers play takes them on an emotional roller coaster made up of feelings of grief, frustration, guilt, exhaustion and an uncertainty about what to do.
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    'Social' cocaine use more harmful than thought
    University of Sydney via Medical Xpress
    In addition to recent high profile cocaine possession arrests and the Australian Crime Commission's Illicit Drug Data Report 2012-2013 being released, University of Sydney research has found that people who use cocaine "socially" are at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
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    Absenteeism draws the attention of corporate world
    Benefits Canada
    Although some progress is being made in absence management, there is still significant opportunity in this area. Fifty-two percent of employers responding to the 2013 Sanofi Canada Healthcare Survey indicated that they have programs in place to formally track absences, an increase from 38 percent in the previous year’s survey results. However, only 32 percent of those respondents with absence tracking programs work with their insurance carrier or consultant to analyze their absenteeism drivers.
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    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ABSENTEEISM


    Context is key when addressing workplace bullying
    Employee Benefit News
    According to the Workplace Bullying Institute in Bellingham Washington, 27 percent of Americans have directly experienced "repeated abusive conduct that is threatening, intimidating, humiliating, work sabotage or work abuse." Gary Namie, director of the WBI. He adds that denial and minimizing of bullying or discounting it have been the two biggest HR-related issues when it comes to this problem.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        The science of workplace morale (Forbes)
    Internet-delivered treatment for substance abuse: A multisite randomized controlled trial (The American Journal of Psychiatry)
    Breakthroughs could lead to 'powerful treatment for depression' (Medical News Today)
    Trauma happens, so what can we do about it? (Oxford University Press)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




    Respectful workplace policy protects businesses, employees
    Mondaq
    Respect in the workplace is governed by both common law and legislation. Respectful workplace legislation includes the following provisions: anti-bullying/harassment, anti-discrimination and anti-violence. Workplaces that violate any of those provisions expose an employer to stiff penalties by regulators such as occupational health and safety and workers compensation bodies or by human rights tribunals.
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    State of the US workplace: Good and bad news
    The Huffington Post
    As the United States moves slowly out of the worst recession it has experienced since the Great Depression, how have employers responded? The ongoing National Study of Employers — a study of employers with 50 or more employees conducted by the Families and Work Institute in partnership with the Society for Human Resource Management — reveals five surprising trends between 2008 (and in some cases 2005) and 2014.
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    Mental health at work: Survey finds 30 percent have problems coping
    The Guardian
    No group in society is invulnerable to ill mental health, yet we know there is still much work to do to break down the stigma which surrounds the topic. Businesses have a role in providing as many access points as possible for the discussion of mental health, and in moving away from a polarized (and often medicalized) perspective that for many is irrelevant, or worse still, intimidating.
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    Anxiety makes neurotic people 'afraid of action'
    Medical NewsToday
    Researchers from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania claim to have revealed new insights in why neurotic people are so prone to evading decision-making. It is thought that neurotic people tend to avoid action when confronted with major life decisions, which can lead to negative consequences in their lives. To examine this, the researchers — who published their findings in the Journal of Personality — wanted to see whether neuroticism is associated with positive or negative actions.
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