This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.






Text Version   RSS   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit May 12, 2015

Home   About EAPA   Join   CEAP Certification   Contact Us  



 



Table of Contents
  • 'Synthetic marijuana' leads to spike in US hospitalizations
  • Mental health advocates push for cultural understanding
  • The billion-dollar rehab racket that drains family savings
  • Decoding the personality of workplace bullies
  • Painkiller abuse costing US employers billions
  • Don't ask, don't tell and the law on invisible disability disclosure
  • Personal cues can have a strong effect on craving in individuals with addiction
  • Employers' Health Care Coalition aims to make workplace mental health a priority
  • Chronic diseases increase risk of depression

  • 'Synthetic marijuana' leads to spike in US hospitalizations
    The Gainesville Times
    A huge nationwide spike in hospitalizations last month caused by a class of drugs often called "synthetic marijuana" illustrates the potency and dangers of the chemicals used to make them and the shifty tactics authorities believe manufacturers are using to evade regulation. "This is the worst outbreak of drug abuse that I've lived through,” said Dr. Steven Marcus, executive director of the New Jersey Poison Information and Education System at the New Jersey Medical School at Rutgers University, who has been monitoring the recent spike. "It's almost as if someone had made a witches' brew of these cannabinoids. This is not just powerful marijuana; this is really dangerous stuff that has effects that can be life-threatening."
       Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE  




    Mental health advocates push for cultural understanding
    U.S. News & World Report
    Studies have revealed that coverage for treatment of mental illness often does not match that provided for other medical conditions, causing advocates to pressure Capitol Hill to enforce laws and pass new ones to reduce disparities in care. But advocates recently took a different route: Targeting doctors, teachers, parents and others in the general public who know someone with a mental illness, with the release of a guidebook offering details on mental disorders and how to get help treating them.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    SPONSORED CONTENT


    The billion-dollar rehab racket that drains family savings
    The Daily Beast
    Until a few years ago, Greg Horvath was making around $30,000 a month as an interventionist, confronting people with drug and alcohol problems and persuading them to go to high-priced rehabs. But as he was becoming wealthier, he says, the people he was purportedly helping rarely kicked their habits, despite repeated stays at some of the best-known facilities in the United States.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Decoding the personality of workplace bullies
    Fast Company
    Most offices have a bully: a person who is pushy and manipulative, and happy to terrorize and harass employees. These people are often quite dominant and socially skilled, and their main purpose is to bring others down in order to gain more status. It has been estimated that 20 percent of employees experience bullying on a regular basis, and this is mostly based on reported cases. Other studies estimate that up to 50 percent of employees will experience bullying at some point of their careers. A growing number of scientific studies are attempting to define a common psychological profile for workplace bullies. Here are the key findings so far:
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    PRODUCT SHOWCASE
      Helping Employees Every Day, The Sovereign Way

    Sovereign Health Group is a national treatment provider for Addiction, Dual Diagnosis, and Mental Health for adults and adolescents with support services for the family system. We offer multiple treatment locations in the U.S. and Accept Most Private Insurance. We are experienced in helping Employee Assistance Programs help their employees get the treatment they deserve and need.
     


    Painkiller abuse costing US employers billions
    Employee Benefit News
    Finding ways to deter painkiller abuse has been a high priority for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in recent years. And with opioid abuse costing U.S. businesses close to $26 billion a year, health plan sponsors should take note as well. Lost work and productivity alone accounts for $10 billion of the tab, according to recent data from Healthentic, a Seattle-based analytics company.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Miss an issue of the EAP Newsbrief? Click here to visit the EAP Newsbrief archive page.


    Don't ask, don't tell and the law on invisible disability disclosure
    Bloomberg BNA
    Untreated mental illness raises workplace safety concerns. It's particularly troubling in fields such as aviation, medicine and law in which employees are responsible for others' lives. For employers, detecting this unseen danger is problematic. Federal and state anti-discrimination laws that regulate their ability to ask medical questions curb the scope of permissible inquiry. The stigma associated with mental illness, which may imperil a worker's career, deters disclosure and treatment.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


      FEATURED COMPANIES
    Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

    Half of all admissions for addiction treatment are individuals returning to treatment, according to the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. But, here is the good news.
    Suboxone: Escape Herion the Outpatient Way

    Heroin addiction has become an epidemic, especially among younger people. Suboxone (buprenorphine) has no tolerance build-up, produces miraculous reductions of withdrawal symptoms and higher outcomes for long-term recovery from opiates. Learn More


    Personal cues can have a strong effect on craving in individuals with addiction
    Medical Xpress
    Unique person-specific cues — such as the presence of a specific friend or hearing a specific song — appear to have a robust effect on craving addictive substances, a recent study shows. The study also found that person-specific cues may have a longer effect on craving than more general substance-specific cues, such as the presence of bottles, syringes or lighters.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE




    Employers' Health Care Coalition aims to make mental health in the workplace a priority
    KCUR-FM
    The Mid-America Coalition on Health Care has introduced the Right Direction Initiative, a free, ready-to-use communication campaign for businesses that want to improve the mental health of their employees. The campaign, said Marcas Miles of the Employers Health Coalition, aims to create awareness about depression in the workplace, reduce the stigma of mental illness and encourage employees to take advantage of the resources at their disposal, including employee assistance programs offered by some employers. Employers should let workers know what is available through their EAP, Miles said.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Chronic diseases increase risk of depression
    Everyday Health
    A 2009 study published in Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics confirms that "when pain is severe, impairs function and/or is refractory to treatment, it is associated with more depressive symptoms and worse depression outcomes. Similarly, depression in patients with pain is associated with more complaints and greater functional impairment." The study goes on to explain that there is growing evidence that "depression and pain share genetic factors, biological pathways and neurotransmitters. Thus, the most promising area of future research is elucidating the neurobiological alterations in pain pathways that intersect with those involved in depression."
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE




    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Data reveals industries most linked to substance abuse (The Washington Post)
    Steps businesses can take to prevent workplace suicide (BenefitsPro)
    Guidance for employers on the impact of marijuana in the workplace (Newswise)
    Benefits of a psychologically fit organization (AccountingWEB)
    Alert, productive — and addicted (Human Resource Executive Online)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
     



    EAP NewsBrief

    Colby Horton, Director of Publishing, 469.420.2601
    Download media kit

    Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
    Contribute news

    Please add eapa@multibriefs.com to your address book
    to ensure our emails reach your inbox.
    Also, please be sure to add eapa@multibriefs.com
    to your Outlook junkmail SafeSenders list.


    This edition of the EAP NewsBrief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!

    Recent issues

    May 5, 2015
    April 28, 2015
    April 21, 2015
    April 14, 2015






    7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063