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Table of Contents
  • Study: Workplace bullying witnesses consider quitting more than victims
  • EAPA invites participation in EAP benchmarking survey
  • A breaking wave
  • Upcoming webinar on leveraging EAPs to address cancer in the workplace
  • Police officers face grave health risk while suffering silently
  • Study reveals top reason behind soldiers' suicides
  • Company slices through stigma of stress, mental health
  • Study: Substance-abuse intervention works best when boss steps in
  • What's on the radar of today's counselor
  • Anxiety, depression afflict one-third of arthritis patients



  • Study: Workplace bullying witnesses consider quitting more than victims
    HealthCanal    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    University of British Columbia research reveals that workers who witness bullying can have a stronger urge to quit than those who experience it firsthand. The findings of the study conducted by the Sauder School of Business at UBC indicate bullying's corrosive effects in the workplace may be more dramatic and costly than suspected. More

    EAPA invites participation in EAP benchmarking survey
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    EAPA encourages you or someone in your EA organization to participate in a ground-breaking, profession-wide EAP Benchmarking Survey funded by a grant from the Employee Assistance Research Foundation. The survey is intended to identify the basic metrics, services, and characteristics of external EA vendor firms. The survey is being conducted by the National Behavioral Consortium, and results of the survey will be made available publicly. More

    A breaking wave
    Risk and Insurance    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    In an effort to help employees better understand their benefit options – and make them partners in the effort to control costs – some companies are making serious changes to their benefits-communication strategies. Electronic tools and social media are fast becoming best practices in benefits communications. But that doesn't mean every HR director or risk manager is jumping on the bandwagon. More

    Upcoming webinar on leveraging EAPs to address cancer in the workplace
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Employee Assistance Programs are an important source of support and information for employees and their dependents, particularly for those facing a major medical diagnosis like cancer. How can these programs serve employees when they are navigating the turbulent course of balancing medical treatments and work responsibilities? More

    Police officers face grave health risk while suffering silently
    Medical Daily    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    In a new study, police officers are at increased risk for many physical and mental diseases. Researchers compared police officers' health risks with that of other people and found that police officers are at increased risk for obesity, metabolic syndrome and suicide. The study included nearly 500 police officers. The researchers found that nearly 40 percent of police officers were obese compared to 32 percent in general population and 25 percent suffered from metabolic syndrome. Officers were at an increased risk for stress and cancer while working officers' risk for suicide was eight times higher than retired police officers. More

    Study reveals top reason behind soldiers' suicides
    USA Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    When researchers asked 72 soldiers at Fort Carson, Colo., why they tried to kill themselves, out of the 33 reasons they had to choose from, all of the soldiers included one in particular – a desire to end intense emotional distress. Suicide within the military has soared since 2005 as the military has waged two wars at once, and this year may set a record with troops committing suicide at the rate of one per day, according to Pentagon figures. More



    Company slices through stigma of stress, mental health
    Employee Benefit News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Once a month, clinical psychologist Dr. Marianne Bowden leaves her office, crosses the street and walks over to Certified Angus Beef, where she strolls the hallways, chatting casually with employees, looking at photos of employees' children and listening to what's going on in their lives. In 2010, Certified Angus Beef launched a unique employee benefit: free onsite access - on company time, no less - to a clinical psychologist. Determined to walk the talk, the company wanted to emphasize the importance of mental health and work-life balance and, in the process, erase some of the stigma that often accompanies mental health issues. More

    Study: Substance-abuse intervention works best when boss steps in
    Workforce    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Enforcing a corporate substance-abuse policy is easier said than done. A new study from the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions may provide managers with some encouragement. Supervisor contact – detecting a substance-abuse problem through normal interaction with an employee – has little effect on employee alcohol or drug use, the study concludes. But supervisor enforcement, or "the ability of supervisors to identify employee substance-use problems as well as their willingness to address employee substance-use problems," can be a potent combination, the study suggests. More

    What's on the radar of today's counselor?
    Counseling Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Counselors were asked which contemporary and emerging theories, models, techniques and approaches are gaining influence in how they work with clients. Despite the wide range of responses, a handful of subjects came up again and again on the knowledge wish lists of counselors, including a structured approach to couples therapy, ways to integrate mind-body techniques and guidance for getting a handle on "all that brain science stuff." More

    Anxiety, depression afflict one-third of arthritis patients
    EmpowHER    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Arthritis Today Magazine recently revealed a new study from the Center for Disease Control found that people with arthritis have high rates of depression and anxiety, that the conditions are under-diagnosed and that many of those affected don't receive mental health treatment – which could potentially help with their physical symptoms. More


     



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