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Table of Contents
  • EAPA reports banner year
  • Employers scramble to address Ebola concerns
  • Meet Tamara Cagney, EAPA's new president-elect
  • When are employers liable for 3rd-party sexual harassment?
  • Beware the excluded employee
  • Study: Obesity and depression are often connected
  • What employers should do about domestic violence
  • Yoga helps war veterans get a handle on their PTSD
  • Workplace bullying victims share their stories
  • 10 tips to help implement a successful wellness program

  • EAPA reports banner year
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association
    EAPA's revenues this year were up 9 percent over the previous year, according to the audited financial results released at the 2014 World EAP Conference in Orlando this month. At the same time, expenses were down by 2 percent, resulting in a positive net margin of more than $231,000 and raising EAPA's net assets to nearly $900,000, the highest level since 2001. "Our continually improving financial position will allow us to implement major improvements in services to members and the EA profession," according to EAPA CEO, Dr. John Maynard. "One significant improvement that's currently underway is the conversion to a substantially upgraded association management database system, which will allow us to operate much more efficiently while improving the member and customer service experience. Connected with that will be a total redesign and upgrade of EAPA's website in coming months, which will be easier to navigate and much more customer friendly than our current site."
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    Employers scramble to address Ebola concerns
    NBC News
    It's no longer just hospitals and healthcare companies that are worrying about whether their workers may have been exposed to Ebola. FirstEnergy recently said two of its employees will work from home with pay for 21 days after it learned they came in contact with the second nurse who contracted Ebola in the Dallas hospital where she worked. "We're just trying to do the right thing," Todd Schneider, spokesman for the Ohio-based energy company told CNBC, about the decision. An increasing number of companies have been seeking legal advice on what to do if they find themselves in a similar situation. The answer may not be as simple as it seems.
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    Meet Tamara Cagney, EAPA's new president-elect
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association
    Tamara Cagney, CEAP, was sworn in as EAPA's president elect at the 2014 World EAP Conference. A long time ALMACA/EAPA member, Tamara has provided Employee Assistance Program (EAP) services for 35 years in both the public and private sectors, in unionized and non-unionized settings. She will become EAPA's president at the 2016 World EAP Conference. Tamara started her mental health career by serving as a US Army Nurse. After her service, as she puts it, "I stumbled upon a job at Crowley Maritime Corporation, which was at that time the largest tugboat company in the U.S. They wanted someone who knew about alcohol and drug disorders, who could assess other issues, and was comfortable in a male dominated environment. That sounded perfect to me. It was new to me but I was used to new. That was my naïve introduction to EAP."
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    When are employers liable for 3rd-party sexual harassment?
    HR.BLR.com
    In this recent case, the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas addressed two important issues for employers. First, it analyzed the circumstances under which an employer may be held liable for a nonemployee's harassment of one of its employees. And second, it addressed the viability of a retaliation claim premised on a termination that was being considered before the employee engaged in protected activity.
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    Beware the excluded employee
    Human Resources Executive
    Sabotage. Harassment. Theft. Violence. These are issues that no HR manager wishes to deal with but that unfortunately impact companies all too often. Recent headlines reflect the damage that can be done by disgruntled employees on a large scale. A recent report co-authored by Marie Mitchell, an associate professor of management at the University of Georgia's Terry College of Business, suggests that, when employees feel disconnected from their work and undervalued, the resulting negative behaviors can potentially cripple organizations.
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    Study: Obesity and depression are often connected
    Science World Report
    Obesity and depression often go hand and hand, according to the report, "Depression and Obesity in the U.S. Adult Household Population, 2005-2010." Report findings showed that about 43 percent of adults who suffered from depression were obese. Many were also using antidepressants, while 55 percent of the depressed patients on medication were obese. The researchers added that as depression severity increased, so did the patients' risk of obesity.
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    What employers should do about domestic violence
    Fortune
    In the wake of the outcry over the National Football League's weak responses to players involved in domestic abuse, it's clear employers have a responsibility to help curb one of America's biggest social and economic problems today: domestic violence. Employers must move beyond inadequate and defensive responses, and establish a zero-tolerance culture.
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    Yoga helps war veterans get a handle on their PTSD
    The Washington Post
    It's no secret that yoga can aid mental well-being. What is more, it can help soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, according to new research. Some of the most damaging consequences of seeing combat can happen in the mind. Of the 2.3 million American veterans who returned from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, up to 20 percent go on to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder at some point. A report published by the Department of Veterans Affairs says at least 22 American veterans take their lives every day.
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    Workplace bullying victims share their stories
    EHS Today
    No one expects to go to work and feel as though they're back on the school playground. Sadly, though, bullying is common for many workers. Approximately 54 million workers, or 35 percent of U.S. employees, are targeted by a bully at some point in their careers, according to the Workplace Bullying Institute. Even more tragic is the fact that many victims of workplace bullying suffer in silence. Stacy Tye-Williams, an assistant professor of communications studies and English at Iowa State University, wanted to hear the stories of victims who haven't reported their instances of workplace bullying. She found their narratives shocking and heartbreaking, and often disjointed and hard to follow.
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    10 tips to help implement a successful wellness program
    Employee Benefit News
    Successful worksite wellness programs may help improve employees' health and productivity and reduce medical costs for employees and the company. The Wellness Council of America states that workplace wellness programs are a wise investment to help address rising health care costs and help improve employees' health and well-being. Here are 10 tips for employers to help implement an effective wellness program.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Victory — US regulatory agencies affirm EAPs as 'limited excepted benefits' (Employee Assistance Professionals Association)
    CDC study shows dramatic increase in baby boomer suicide rates (Pysch Central)
    The 1st blood test for depression opens a workplace Pandora's box (BRW)
    Study suggests 'tough love' managerial strategy ineffective in the workplace (Psych Central)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


     



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