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41st Annual Anatomic Pathology Conference

Feb. 13-15, 2015 at Disney's Contemporary Resort in Orlando, Florida

Do you need Self-Assessment Modules? The Florida Society of Pathologists will be offering a Post-Event Self-Assessment Module (SAMs) Exam to help your Maintenance of Certification (MOC) fulfillment. You must attend the 41st Annual Anatomic Pathology Conference to sit for this online exam.

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CDC installing cameras in labs in agency-wide safety push
Reuters
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has introduced camera monitoring of workers in its highest-level biosafety laboratories as it seeks to restore public faith in its procedures after a series of mishaps, agency officials tell Reuters.
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New test identifies early-stage melanoma with metastatic risk
Medscape
Because two-thirds of melanoma patients who die or experience metastatic disease are initially diagnosed with early-stage disease, it is important to determine risk for metastasis in patients with early-stage melanoma. About 75 percent of patients with melanoma have early disease (stage I or II) at diagnosis.
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Lawsuit names Quest Diagnostics as defendant and alleges violation of antitrust laws involving medical lab testing
Dark Daily
In California, three California residents filed a class action lawsuit charging Quest Diagnostics Incorporated with acquiring competitor medical labs, paying kickbacks to physicians, and developing exclusionary agreements with health insurers to monopolize the market for clinical laboratory testing in Northern California.
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Big precision medicine plan raises patient privacy concerns
Scientific American
A new effort to create tailor-made medicine for patients around the U.S. is getting a boost from a $215-million presidential initiative. It's an ambitious undertaking fraught with concerns about patient privacy, funding and how such data would be stored. But because it's such an innovative idea, there are few blueprints to work with.
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New software analyzes human genomes faster than other available technologies
Nationwide Children's Hospital via ScienceDaily
Investigators at Nationwide Children's Hospital have developed an analysis "pipeline" that slashes the time it takes to search a person's genome for disease-causing variations from weeks to hours. An article describing the ultra-fast, highly scalable software was published in an issue of Genome Biology.
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US to develop DNA study of 1 million people
MIT Technology Review
President Barack Obama is proposing to spend $215 million on a "precision medicine" initiative the centerpiece of which will be a national study involving the health records and DNA of one million volunteers, administration officials said. Precision medicine refers to treatments tailored to a person's genetic profile, an idea already transforming how doctors fight cancer and some rare diseases.
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Researchers broaden the catalog of biological chimeras for the study of the genome
Medical Xpress
Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre's Structural Computational Biology Group, led by Alfonso Valencia, are making the largest ever catalog of biological chimeras available to the public domain. Specifically, the new database comprises a collection of more than 29,000 small RNA molecules that originate from different genomic regions. These molecules, the so-called chimeric RNAs, could reveal useful markers for the clinical oncology practice, and even novel drug targets for cancer treatment.
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How (and why) chemists figured out how to unboil an egg
The Washington Post
You can't unscramble an egg. But you can unboil it. That's what chemists with University of California, Irvine, and South Australia's Flinders University managed to do, and their findings were published in the journal ChemBioChem. All it took was a chemical solution and a machine that spins at high speeds. No, the study wasn't intended to figure out just how to unboil eggs. These aren't precious commodities. If you accidentally boil one, just grab another. Rather, the eggs were used as a proxy for a much more serious endeavor: making cancer research more time and cost efficient.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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