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FSP 2015 Summer Anatomic Pathology Conference!

You don't want to miss the great topics and speakers scheduled for the FSP 2015 Summer Anatomic Pathology Conference. The event will take place July 25-26, 2015, at The Boca Raton Resort in Florida. More information on the program, speakers and registration will be available soon at www.flpath.org.

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Florida rheumatologist says UnitedHealthcare's management program for clinical lab tests could jeopardize patient care
Dark Daily
In Florida, the confrontation between one of the nation's largest health insurance corporations and physicians, clinical laboratory managers, and pathologists continues. The source of this confrontation are the restrictive and burdensome requirements for medical laboratory test ordering imposed last fall by UnitedHealthcare and administered by BeaconLBS, a business division of Laboratory Corporation of America. For Florida rheumatologist Olga Kromo, M.D., UnitedHealthcare's new decision-support system that physicians are required to use when ordering clinical laboratory tests is highly flawed.
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Innovation is sweeping through US medical schools
The Wall Street Journal
Critics have long faulted U.S. medical education for being hidebound, imperious and out of touch with modern healthcare needs. The core structure of medical school — two years of basic science followed by two years of clinical work — has been in place since 1910. Now a wave of innovation is sweeping through medical schools, much of it aimed at producing young doctors who are better prepared to meet the demands of the nation's changing healthcare system.
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Epigenome may hold promise for conquering diseases
News Medical
The human genome project captured the public imagination when its first draft was published 14 years ago in the international science journal Nature, but the epigenome may hold the real promise for conquering disease. While your genome is the same in every cell in your body (except for the gametes), the epigenome is made up of chemical compounds that determine which part of the genome is available for instructing the cells to make proteins. It's why a skin cell, for example, knows it's a skin cell.
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Blood samples reflect info from tumor biopsies in NSCLC
Medscape
New findings show that it is feasible to determine epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) mutations from the blood samples of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and correlate them to clinical outcomes. The information is similar to that obtained from tumor tissue biopsies, but blood samples are obviously easier to obtain. The findings, from an analysis of the phase 3 European Erlotinib Versus Chemotherapy study, were published online in JAMA Oncology.
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Study: Customized DNA rings aid early cancer detection in mice
Standford Medicine
Imagine: You pop a pill into your mouth and swallow it. It dissolves, releasing tiny particles that are absorbed and cause only cancerous cells to secrete a specific protein into your bloodstream. Two days from now, a finger-prick blood sample will expose whether you've got cancer and even give a rough idea of its extent. That's a highly futuristic concept. But its realization may be only years, not decades, away.
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WHO approves breakthrough 15-minute Ebola test
Reuters
The World Health Organization has approved the first rapid test for Ebola in a potential breakthrough for ending an epidemic that has killed almost 10,000 people in West Africa, it said. The test, developed by U.S. firm Corgenix Medical Corp, is less accurate than the standard test but is easy to perform, does not require electricity, and can give results within 15 minutes, WHO spokesman Tarik Jasarevic said.
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23andMe and the promise of anonymous genetic testing
The New York Times
The FDA has allowed 23andMe to market genetic tests for mutations directly to the public. The agency said that, for the most part, so-called carrier tests would no longer need advance approval before being marketed this way. But 23andMe is also offering access to its data for research, opening up questions about privacy and anonymity.
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Physician locum tenens rates near double digits
HealthLeaders Media
More new physicians entering the workforce are opting for jobs as locum tenens in hospitals, physician practices and other provider sites, an industry survey shows. Staff Care, a healthcare temporary staffing firm, polled 2,087 locum tenens physicians and found that 21 percent began temp work immediately after finishing their medical training. That's up from 16 percent in 2013 and 14 percent in 2012. A separate survey by The Physicians Foundation found that 46 percent of doctors will change their practice styles within three years, and 9 percent plan to work locum tenens.
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10X Genomics unwraps its 'toaster oven' for better DNA sequencing
Forbes
California-based 10X Genomics, which raised $55.5 million in venture capital recently, is providing its first technical look at the technology that drew the investment. The company and its scientific collaborators are discussing its method for assembling tough "long-read" stretches of DNA into whole genomes at the Advances in Genome Biology & Technology conference. Genome sequencing has gotten much faster and cheaper in recent years, but today’s genomes still suffer from informational gaps. Part of the reason is technical.
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FSP has no control over and does not officially endorse the content of the information available on the links contained in the "Florida Pathology Today" or links imbedded in articles within the "Florida Pathology Today." These links are provided as a courtesy only. Linked sites are not a part of the "Florida Pathology Today." The owners of those linked sites, and not FSP, own the intellectual property rights to the material on the linked sites. FSP cannot certify the accuracy of material published on linked sites. Additionally, the contents of this e-Newsletter and the above referenced links, including any advice, suggestions, and/or recommendations have NOT been generated as part of any professional evaluation.

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Under no circumstances will the authors, editors, webmasters, and the FSP Board of Directors affiliated with the "Florida Pathology Today" be liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or any action taken by you or anyone else in reliance on such information or view, or for any incidental, consequential, special, or similar damages even if advised of the possibility of such damages.

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