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Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit    September 17, 2014


 




Not too early to mark your calendars
Florida Society of Pathologists
41st Annual Anatomic Pathology Conference

Feb. 13-15, 2015
Disney's Contemporary® Resort
Lake Buena Vista, Orlando, Florida

Renowned Faculty Presenting Leading Edge Topics
Make your hotel reservation today! Enjoy Valentine's Day and President's Day Weekend with your family in Walt Disney World Call Disney's Group Reservations at 407-824-1383, option 1 and ask for FSP's discounted group rate. Detailed information on this sensational program and registration information will be posted to www.flpath.org.

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A fast-growing medical lab tests anti-kickback law
The Wall Street Journal
A fast-growing Virginia laboratory has collected hundreds of millions of dollars from Medicare while using a strategy that is now under regulatory scrutiny: It paid doctors who sent it patients' blood for testing. Health Diagnostic Laboratory Inc. transformed itself from a startup incorporated in late 2008 into a major lab with $383 million in 2013 revenues, 41 percent of that from Medicare.
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Automated image analysis cannot replace pathologist
Medscape
Automated image analysis is gaining ground in the field, but the pathologist still has the advantage, say researchers here at the College of American Pathologists 2014 meeting. While evaluation of automated analysis is still in the early stages, Maryam Abdelghani, M.D., from Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, explained to Medscape Medical News, "in the long run, it could help with time management."
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FDA defends plan to regulate lab-developed tests
Science AAAS
A move by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to regulate diagnostic tests developed in thousands of laboratories is picking up steam and drawing fire. The agency recently notified Congress that it plans to regulate some of these so-called laboratory developed tests, which unlike tests marketed by diagnostic manufacturers, don't currently require FDA approval. FDA has not yet released a draft guidance on the matter, but at a hearing, members of the U.S. House of Representatives Energy & Commerce Committee's health subcommittee raised questions about the agency's authority to regulate these tests, its motivation for doing so and the potential impact of such regulations on the diagnostic industry.
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Urine test could catch lung cancer early
Chemistry World
Lung cancer could be identified earlier, thanks to a new test that uses surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy to detect a cancer biomarker in urine. Detecting lung cancer is difficult as it is hidden in the body, and current clinical methods are not effective at an early stage; the one-year survival rate after diagnosis in the U.K. is just 29–33 percent.
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Doximity's 'Residency Navigator' injects transparency into graduate medical education
U.S. News & World Report
It's crunch time for fourth-year medical students to decide where they want to do their post-graduate training. But fourth-years have long faced a dilemma. They've had no way to objectively assess which residency programs offer the best prospects of gaining the clinical training and career opportunities they may covet. For example, a student hoping to go into cardiology would be blind to which internal medicine residencies' graduates tend to ultimately subspecialize in that field.
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Medical labs make test results easier for patients to understand
The Wall Street Journal
As more patients gain direct access to lab reports and test results, healthcare providers are offering new tools to help them navigate the maze of numbers and use the data to better manage their own care. Individual patients now can see their results on a wide variety of medical tests including complete blood counts, urinalysis and allergy tests, under a federal rule that went into effect in April and pre-empted a number of state laws prohibiting disclosure to individuals.
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More reports of health insurers' reluctance to reimburse for genetic tests, angering patients and causing labs to go unpaid
Dark Daily
Concerned about the increased cost of genetic tests, health insurers are becoming reluctant to pay for many types of molecular diagnostics and gene tests. When refusing to pay for these tests, however, they face a buzz saw of angry patients — many of whom see a genetic test as their last resort for a diagnosis and selection of a therapy that might just work for them.
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More deadly pathogens, toxins found improperly stored in NIH and FDA labs
The Washington Post
Workers scouring government laboratories in the wake of the July discovery of smallpox and the mishandling of other infectious agents in federal facilities in recent months have found half a dozen more improperly stored substances — including the deadly toxin ricin and the bacteria that cause plague.
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Column: Be wary of doctor rating sites
USA Today
The public can rate almost everything on the Internet today: books, hotels, restaurants — and even doctors. But while your chances of getting a great meal at a 5-star restaurant are pretty high, receiving excellent care from a 5-star doctor is less certain. Doctor ratings generally focus on more subjective issues, such as patient wait times, time spent with the doctor and physician courtesy. Those are obviously important issues, but they paint an incomplete picture. Doctors with stellar interpersonal skills may not be the best at controlling patients' blood pressures or managing their diabetes.
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Disclaimer: The authors, editors, and the Florida Society of Pathologists (FSP) Executive Committee affiliated with "Florida Pathology Today" e-Newsletter cannot and do not warrant the completeness, accuracy, non-infringement, merchantability, timeliness or fitness for a particular purpose of the information or views contained within this publication, or available through the links provided within articles contained within this publication.

FSP has no control over and does not officially endorse the content of the information available on the links contained in the "Florida Pathology Today" or links imbedded in articles within the "Florida Pathology Today." These links are provided as a courtesy only. Linked sites are not a part of the "Florida Pathology Today." The owners of those linked sites, and not FSP, own the intellectual property rights to the material on the linked sites. FSP cannot certify the accuracy of material published on linked sites. Additionally, the contents of this e-Newsletter and the above referenced links, including any advice, suggestions, and/or recommendations have NOT been generated as part of any professional evaluation.

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Under no circumstances will the authors, editors, webmasters, and the FSP Board of Directors affiliated with the "Florida Pathology Today" be liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or any action taken by you or anyone else in reliance on such information or view, or for any incidental, consequential, special, or similar damages even if advised of the possibility of such damages.

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