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Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit    October 15, 2014


 




Your FSP at work for you

Recently two issues pertinent to your practice have required engagement by the FSP.

First, we have been actively engaged with UnitedHealthcare and LabCorp Beacon along with the CAP in trying to modify the pilot Laboratory Benefits Management Program currently underway in Florida. No doubt you are aware no denials of payment will occur until January. I am hopeful we can achieve substantial revision in their program, which is unacceptable in its current form. I have discussed the details of our negotiations with several members and remain available to others. I will detail further developments when they solidify.

Secondly, we have our lobbyist Amy Young and attorney Steve Weinstein involved in preventing unacceptable modification of the definition of “usual and customary” in the Medicaid rules. While this might have minor direct impact, if the definition was adopted by other carriers, it could have severe potential financial repercussions. This also is an ongoing effort.

Brett Cantrell, M.D.

President, FSP




You are invited to FSP's 41st Annual Anatomic Pathology Conference
FSP
It will be another Sensational program featuring presentations on cutting edge pathology topics. Click here for more information and to register.
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UnitedHealthcare delays Lab Benefit Management Program; Forensic pathologist Dr. Norman Thiersch resigns
Pathology Blawg
The Laboratory Benefit Management Program appears to be very cumbersome and will require physicians to notify BeaconLBS before ordering certain laboratory tests, including anatomic pathology. Participating laboratories must verify Beacon has been notified before performing any of the tests on the 82-test list, or else risk not being reimbursed for the test(s).
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Clinical labs, pathology groups under pressure to cut costs and deal with shrinking budgets for 2015
Dark Daily
By any measure, this year's budget season is a tough one for the nation's clinical laboratories and pathology groups. Most labs are scrambling to adjust to reduced reimbursement and directives from their parent hospitals and health systems to shrink their lab budgets for 2015. It's why smart cost-cutting tops the list of challenges at all medical laboratory managers and pathologists. Lab leaders need effective approaches to trim spending in their lab without the need to lay off skilled medical technologists and other experienced lab scientists.
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Diagnosing deadly cancers earlier with 'lab-on-a-chip'
Medical News Today
At present, diagnosis of lung cancer relies on an invasive biopsy that is only effective after tumors are bigger than 3 centimeters or even metastatic. Earlier detection would vastly improve patients' chances of survival. Now a team of researchers is developing a "lab-on-a-chip" that promises to detect lung cancer — and possibly other deadly cancers — much earlier, using only a small drop of a patient's blood.
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BU biolab nears OK amid hopes for tackling Ebola, safety concerns
The Boston Globe
As the Ebola outbreak rages in West Africa, a seven-story laboratory designed to study that virus and others like it stands mostly empty in Boston's South End. But researchers at Boston University, which built the high-security lab with $200 million in federal money, expect a decade of frustration to end soon, perhaps within a year. BU's plans have survived 11 years of risk assessments, public hearings and lawsuits from critics who question the laboratory's safety and value. Now, a review by the Boston Public Health Commission and an inspection by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are the final hurdles before scientists can hunt for treatments and vaccines against the world's deadliest pathogens.
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Study addresses the challenge of genomic heterogeneity
News Medical
Known cancer-driving genomic aberrations in localized lung cancer appear to be so consistently present across tumors that a single biopsy of one region of the tumor is likely to identify most of them, according to a paper published in Science. The study led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center addresses the challenge of what scientists call genomic heterogeneity, the presence of many different variations that drive tumor formation, growth and progression, and likely complicate the choice and potential efficacy of therapy.
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Early detection of colorectal cancer may be possible with newly found biomarkers
Medical News Today
Despite progress over recent decades, colorectal cancer remains one of the most deadly cancers worldwide. The main cause of death is spread of disease to other organs such as the liver and the lungs. Thus, any research that suggests new lines of approach for making earlier diagnoses is of keen interest to public health.
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A culture of inclusiveness: Diversity matters in medical education
By Jonathan Ryan Batson
In the world of medicine, many on various committees and boards still believe diversity is not an issue. They think that a few seats at the table means that somehow we have all arrived and that the system is equal. That view is not only morally profane, but also incompetent. It shows the lack of interest to go further and increase both physical bodies for diversity as well as the the cultural dynamics of diversity in their student body and full-time faculty. A diverse education is needed to improve cultural competency and social awareness of the communities that many hope to serve.
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Nurturing resilience, responsibility and resolve in medical students
Medical Teacher
Over the past decade, the medical education literature has recognized the need to develop a culture that nurtures well-being and resilience in students. However, the introduction of or increase in student fees precipitated a shift in higher education policies toward a consumer model of education. Importantly, it has altered the expectations of students and promoted a sense of "entitlement," rather than "striving" for something where success is not guaranteed.
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Soon, it will cost less to sequence a genome than to flush a toilet
Business Insider
We don't traditionally think of flushing the toilet as an action that costs money. But actually the cost of a flush comes in at about 1 cent. Imagine if sequencing a genome was that easy and cheap? Soon, that could be a reality, according to a leading genome researcher. He predicts we will be sequencing genomes for pennies as soon as 2020. And when genomes are that cheap to come by, the information they provide will completely revolutionize medicine as we know it.
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Researchers develop new way to assess freshness, effectiveness of whole blood
Dark Daily
At the University of Illinois, researchers have developed a new method to assess the freshness and clinical effectiveness of whole blood. As these findings are validated, pathologists and clinical laboratory scientists who manage hospital blood banks may need to establish new guidelines for the use of such blood products.
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Disclaimer: The authors, editors, and the Florida Society of Pathologists (FSP) Executive Committee affiliated with "Florida Pathology Today" e-Newsletter cannot and do not warrant the completeness, accuracy, non-infringement, merchantability, timeliness or fitness for a particular purpose of the information or views contained within this publication, or available through the links provided within articles contained within this publication.

FSP has no control over and does not officially endorse the content of the information available on the links contained in the "Florida Pathology Today" or links imbedded in articles within the "Florida Pathology Today." These links are provided as a courtesy only. Linked sites are not a part of the "Florida Pathology Today." The owners of those linked sites, and not FSP, own the intellectual property rights to the material on the linked sites. FSP cannot certify the accuracy of material published on linked sites. Additionally, the contents of this e-Newsletter and the above referenced links, including any advice, suggestions, and/or recommendations have NOT been generated as part of any professional evaluation.

The authors, editors, webmasters, and the FSP Board of Directors affiliated with the "Florida Pathology Today" e-Newsletter shall not be liable to anyone for any loss or injury caused in whole or in part by its negligence or contingencies beyond its control in procuring, compiling, interpreting, reporting or delivering this e-Newsletter and any information included in this e-Newsletter.

Under no circumstances will the authors, editors, webmasters, and the FSP Board of Directors affiliated with the "Florida Pathology Today" be liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or any action taken by you or anyone else in reliance on such information or view, or for any incidental, consequential, special, or similar damages even if advised of the possibility of such damages.

The above warranties are the only warranties of any kind either expressed or implied, including warranties of merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose.

 



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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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