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Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit    December 23, 2014


 



As 2014 comes to a close, FSP would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of Pathology Today a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 7.


41st Annual Anatomic Pathology Conference

Feb. 13-15, 2015 at Disney's Contemporary Resort in Orlando, Florida

You are invited to join the Florida Society of Pathologists at the 41st Annual Anatomic Pathology Conference at Disney's Contemporary Resort® in beautiful Lake Buena Vista, Florida!

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Scientists identify 'high-priority' chemicals that may cause breast cancer
Medical News Today
From May 14: An estimated 12.4 percent of women born in the U.S. today will develop breast cancer at some point during their lives. Past research has indicated that exposure to some chemicals may increase the risk of breast cancer. Now, a new study has identified 17 "high-priority" chemicals women should avoid in order to reduce such risk and demonstrates how their presence can be detected.
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Blood test may spot pancreatic cancer earlier
HealthDay via U.S. News & World Report
From May 28: Researchers report that a new blood test could help doctors find pancreatic cancer at an earlier stage, potentially improving a patient's chances of survival. A set of four "markers" — or signs — in the blood identified cases of pancreatic cancer nine out of 10 times, sorting malignancies from other diseases like chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cysts.
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OIG issues fraud alert for physician-lab relationships
By Jessica Belle
From July 9: The Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General recently issued a special fraud alert that singles out the laboratory-referring physician relationship for its focused attention. The OIG has repeatedly emphasized that a lab providing free or below-market goods or services to a physician who is a source of referrals, or paying a physician more than fair market value for his or her services, could constitute illegal remuneration under the federal anti-kickback statute. In light of this special fraud alert, physicians and laboratories should review their compensation arrangements.
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A fast-growing medical lab tests anti-kickback law
The Wall Street Journal
From Sept. 17: A fast-growing Virginia laboratory has collected hundreds of millions of dollars from Medicare while using a strategy that is now under regulatory scrutiny: It paid doctors who sent it patients' blood for testing. Health Diagnostic Laboratory Inc. transformed itself from a startup incorporated in late 2008 into a major lab with $383 million in 2013 revenues, 41 percent of that from Medicare.
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Whistleblower lawsuits at US clinical pathology laboratories are rising
Dark Daily
From Nov. 26: Whistleblower activity across the medical laboratory industry seems to be increasing. This can be both a positive and a negative trend for pathologists and clinical laboratory managers. On the positive side, a whistleblower lawsuit that is joined by the U.S. Department of Justice and state attorney generals is one way to curb the illegal marketing and business practices of those medical lab companies willing to gain a competitive market advantage by pushing their interpretation of federal and state laws beyond legal limits.
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A junior doctor's salary
The Atlantic
From Aug. 20: Doctors are spending more and more time in residency and fellowship programs — sometimes up to a decade — but their salaries during those years (accounting for inflation) haven't increased in 40 years. Factoring in time spent in school and residency, one study from economists at Yale recently found that the average female primary care physician would have made more money over the course of her career had she been a physician assistant.
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Jury finds oncologist negligent for withholding crucial information from pathologist
The Pathology Blawg
From Aug. 6: A Massachusetts jury found an oncologist was negligent when he failed to provide pertinent clinical information to a hematopathologist that may have prevented an erroneous diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a patient who subsequently died from treatment complications.
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Study shows 3rd gene as indicator for breast cancer
The New York Times
From Aug. 20: Mutations in a gene called PALB2 raise the risk of breast cancer in women by almost as much as mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, the infamous genes implicated in most inherited cases of the disease, a team of researchers reported. Previous data had indicated that mutations in PALB2 were linked to breast cancer, and many genetic tests already screen for them. But it had not been clear to what extent these mutations raised a carrier's odds of developing the disease.
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Palmetto GBA defining pathology Medicare fraud with new standards
The Pathology Blawg
From June 11: Palmetto GBA, the Medicare Administrative Contractor for Jursidiction 11 (the Carolinas and Virginias), is taking the rather extraordinary step of defining, using an evidence-based approach, the standards by which certain specimens should be pathologically evaluated. By doing this, Palmetto is placing itself at the forefront of combating Medicare fraud by pathologists and in-office laboratory owners.
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UnitedHealthcare delays Lab Benefit Management Program; Forensic pathologist Dr. Norman Thiersch resigns
Pathology Blawg
From Oct. 15: The Laboratory Benefit Management Program appears to be very cumbersome and will require physicians to notify BeaconLBS before ordering certain laboratory tests, including anatomic pathology. Participating laboratories must verify Beacon has been notified before performing any of the tests on the 82-test list, or else risk not being reimbursed for the test(s).
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Disclaimer: The authors, editors, and the Florida Society of Pathologists (FSP) Executive Committee affiliated with "Florida Pathology Today" e-Newsletter cannot and do not warrant the completeness, accuracy, non-infringement, merchantability, timeliness or fitness for a particular purpose of the information or views contained within this publication, or available through the links provided within articles contained within this publication.

FSP has no control over and does not officially endorse the content of the information available on the links contained in the "Florida Pathology Today" or links imbedded in articles within the "Florida Pathology Today." These links are provided as a courtesy only. Linked sites are not a part of the "Florida Pathology Today." The owners of those linked sites, and not FSP, own the intellectual property rights to the material on the linked sites. FSP cannot certify the accuracy of material published on linked sites. Additionally, the contents of this e-Newsletter and the above referenced links, including any advice, suggestions, and/or recommendations have NOT been generated as part of any professional evaluation.

The authors, editors, webmasters, and the FSP Board of Directors affiliated with the "Florida Pathology Today" e-Newsletter shall not be liable to anyone for any loss or injury caused in whole or in part by its negligence or contingencies beyond its control in procuring, compiling, interpreting, reporting or delivering this e-Newsletter and any information included in this e-Newsletter.

Under no circumstances will the authors, editors, webmasters, and the FSP Board of Directors affiliated with the "Florida Pathology Today" be liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or any action taken by you or anyone else in reliance on such information or view, or for any incidental, consequential, special, or similar damages even if advised of the possibility of such damages.

The above warranties are the only warranties of any kind either expressed or implied, including warranties of merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose.

 



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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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