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Text Version   RSS   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit                     January 22, 2015

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Welcome to the ICBS Discovery e-NewsBrief from the International Chemical Biology Society. This is a free, bi-weekly digest of headlines and news related to the chemical biology field. With a variety of stories selected from media outlets around the world, we hope you will find this publication informative. The e-NewsBrief will arrive in your email inbox every other Thursday.

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BPA chemical affects brain development in zebrafish
Nature World News
Bisphenol A reportedly affects brain development in young zebrafish, causing concern that it can also negatively impact human brains still developing in the womb, according to new research. While it would seem that zebrafish and humans are drastically different, and therefore their responses to environmental stimuli are different too, it turns out that about 80 percent of the genes found in people have a counterpart in zebrafish.
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CDC: Flu vaccine only 23 percent effective this season
The Washington Post
So it turns out this season's flu vaccine was kind of a dud. Getting it reduced a person's chance of having to visit the doctor because of the flu by only 23 percent — and possibly even less for many adults — according to data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Image captures how blood stem cells take root
Drug Discovery & Development
A see-through zebrafish and enhanced imaging provide the first direct glimpse of how blood stem cells take root in the body to generate blood. Reporting online in the journal Cell, researchers in Boston Children's Hospital's Stem Cell Research Program describe a surprisingly dynamic system that offers several clues for improving bone marrow transplants in patients with cancer, severe immune deficiencies and blood disorders, and for helping those transplants "take."
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Study reveals many Americans at risk for alcohol-medication interactions
National Institutes of Health
Nearly 42 percent of U.S. adults who drink also report using medications known to interact with alcohol, based on a study from the National Institutes of Health. Among those over 65 years of age who drink alcohol, nearly 78 percent report using alcohol-interactive medications. Such medications are widely used, prescribed for common conditions such as depression, diabetes and high blood pressure.
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New drug Opdivo successfully ends lung cancer trial
USA Today
A new cancer drug, Opdivo, is working so well that pharmaceutical giant Bristol-Myers Squibb has announced it is stopping a trial in lung cancer two years ahead of schedule. The trial compared Opdivo to Docetaxel, a type of chemo used for patients whose cancers have recurred after treatment. The study, in 234 patients, was the largest trial of the drug in lung cancer.
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New 'triggered-release' mechanism could improve drug delivery
R&D Magazine
More efficient medical treatments could be developed thanks to a new method for triggering the rearrangement of chemical particles. The new method, developed at the University of Warwick, uses two "parent" nanoparticles that are designed to interact only when in proximity to each other and trigger the release of drug molecules contained within both.
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New genetic clues found in fragile X syndrome
Science Daily
Scientists have gained new insight into fragile X syndrome — the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability — by studying the case of a person without the disorder, but with two of its classic symptoms. In patients with fragile X, a key gene is completely disabled, eliminating a protein that regulates electrical signals in the brain and causing a host of behavioral, neurological and physical symptoms.
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'Molecular scissors' could prevent genetic diseases before conception
Health Canal
Scientists have developed a new technique that will streamline biomedical research and could in the future prevent genetic diseases before the moment of conception. In a study published in the Nature Group journal Scientific Reports, the scientists used "molecular scissors" that can edit the DNA of either the egg or sperm of mice during fertilization.
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