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Text Version   RSS   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit                     March 05, 2015

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Welcome to the ICBS Discovery e-NewsBrief from the International Chemical Biology Society. This is a free, bi-weekly digest of headlines and news related to the chemical biology field. With a variety of stories selected from media outlets around the world, we hope you will find this publication informative. The e-NewsBrief will arrive in your email inbox every other Thursday.

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Cancer drug first tested in dogs begins human trials
R&D Magazine
A new drug that prompts cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is now entering phase I clinical trials in humans. The drug, called PAC-1, first showed promise in the treatment of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring cancers, and is still in clinical trials in dogs with osteosarcoma.
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Enzyme structures offer insights into metabolism of cholesterol, other lipids
University of Michigan
With the aid of X-ray crystallography, researchers at the University of Michigan have revealed the structures of two closely related enzymes that play essential roles in the body's ability to metabolize excess lipids, including cholesterol. The findings are an important step toward understanding and being able to therapeutically target disorders and drug side effects that cause lipids, including cholesterol, to build up in the body.
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Unlocking the key to immunological memory in bacteria
R&D Magazine
A powerful genome editing tool may soon become even more powerful. Researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have unlocked the key to how bacteria are able to "steal" genetic information from viruses and other foreign invaders for use in their own immunological memory system.
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New method makes synthetic biology research more accessible
Phys.Org
Deep in the heart of synthetic biology are the proteins that make it tick. Protein engineering is the crucial pulse of the booming, relatively new scientific discipline. Scientists grow, harvest and reprogram proteins to become new drug therapeutics, environmentally friendly fuels and vaccines. Producing proteins quickly and in large quantities has been and remains a major challenge in the field.
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New target identified in fight against Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis
Medical Xpress
Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases. Working with mice, two research teams at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis independently linked the protein to the ability to clear debris from the brain.
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The promiscuity of chemical probes discovered
Phys.Org
Researchers have applied a new computational methodology to anticipate the degree of selectivity of the molecules that are used to study protein functions and reduce the risk of establishing erroneous relations between proteins and diseases. The proteins under study could be future candidates for new therapeutic targets. The study is published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology.
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Scientists create potential long-acting HIV therapeutic
National Institutes of Health
Scientists have created a new molecule that shows promise for controlling HIV without daily antiretroviral drugs. The molecule foils a wider range of HIV strains in the laboratory than any known broadly neutralizing HIV antibody and is more powerful than some of the most potent of these antibodies. In addition, the molecule safely protected monkeys from infection with an HIV-like virus during a 40-week study period.
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Anticholinergic drugs linked to risk for pneumonia in elderly
Science Daily
Taking commonly used medications with anticholinergic effects is associated with a significantly higher risk for developing pneumonia in a study of more than 3,000 older Group Health patients living in the community — not in nursing homes, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
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