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Text Version   RSS   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit                     April 02, 2015

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Welcome to the ICBS Discovery e-NewsBrief from the International Chemical Biology Society. This is a free, bi-weekly digest of headlines and news related to the chemical biology field. With a variety of stories selected from media outlets around the world, we hope you will find this publication informative. The e-NewsBrief will arrive in your email inbox every other Thursday.

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Is the drug industry on the right track in Alzheimer's research?
San Francisco Chronicle
Just days after Biogen revealed promising early data from an experimental Alzheimer's treatment, new research from the Mayo Clinic may revive a long-running debate over whether the drug industry is focusing on the right target in developing therapies to treat the disease. The study, published in the journal Brain, found that the accumulation of dysfunctional tau protein is the real source of cognitive decline and memory loss seen in Alzheimer's.
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Gene identified that drives aggressive form of breast cancer
Medical News Today
A team of researchers have identified a gene that drives one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. They hope that by finding a way to block the gene they may be able to make the cancer less aggressive. The authors believe the most aggressive form of triple-negative breast cancer originates from stem cells. The study was published in Nature Communications.
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Researchers develop new potential drug for rare leukemia
Medical Xpress
Researchers have developed a new drug that shows potential in laboratory studies against a rare type of acute leukemia. And additional studies suggest the same compound could play a role in prostate cancer treatment as well. The compound was developed by researchers who have been working for several years to identify a small-molecule inhibitor that would block the interaction between the protein menin and MLL fusion proteins that cause a rare type of acute leukemia.
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MRI based on sugar molecule can tell cancerous from noncancerous cells
R&D Magazine
Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn't cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly. Now results of a new study suggest that MRI could one day make biopsies more effective or even replace them altogether by noninvasively detecting telltale sugar molecules shed by the outer membranes of cancerous cells. The MRI technique, so far tested only in test tube-grown cells and mice, is described in a report published online in Nature Communications.
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Scientists convert microbubbles to nanoparticles
Science Daily
Biomedical researchers have successfully converted microbubble technology already used in diagnostic imaging into nanoparticles that stay trapped in tumors to potentially deliver targeted, therapeutic payloads. The discovery, published online in Nature Nanotechnology, details how the researchers created a new type of microbubble using a compound called porphyrin — a naturally occurring pigment in nature that harvests light.
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New, whole-virus vaccine for Ebola effective in primates
Ars Technica
A study published in Science demonstrates that vaccination with a mutated form of the Ebola virus provides some measure of protection to non-human primates. This finding places the vaccine one step closer to clinical trials in humans. The researchers publishing this study have developed what's called a "whole virus" vaccine for Ebola. Viruses have proteins on their exterior and genetic material on their interior. Whole virus vaccines present the host's immune system with multiple viral proteins and the viral genetic material.
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Microsecond Raman imaging might probe cells, organs for disease
R&D Magazine
A vibrational spectroscopic imaging technology that can take images of living cells could represent an advanced medical diagnostic tool for the early detection of cancer and other diseases. High-speed spectroscopic imaging makes it possible to observe the quickly changing metabolic processes inside living cells and to image large areas of tissue, making it possible to scan an entire organ.
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Shape-shifting probe may revolutionize biology and clinical diagnostics
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Researchers say they have developed a shape-shifting probe, which is capable of sensitive, high-resolution remote biological sensing that is not possible with current technology. If eventually put into widespread use, the probe, about one-hundredth as wide as a human hair, could have a major impact on research in medicine, chemistry and biology and might be used in clinical diagnostics, according to the scientists.
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High-tech method allows rapid imaging of functions in living brain
Science Daily
Researchers studying cancer and other invasive diseases rely on high-resolution imaging to see tumors and other activity deep within the body's tissues. Using a new high-speed, high-resolution imaging method, they were able to see blood flow, blood oxygenation, oxygen metabolism and other functions inside a living mouse brain at faster rates than ever before.
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