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Text Version   RSS   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit                     July 10, 2014

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Welcome to the ICBS Discovery e-NewsBrief from the International Chemical Biology Society. This is a free, bi-weekly digest of headlines and news related to the chemical biology field. With a variety of stories selected from media outlets around the world, we hope you will find this publication informative. The e-NewsBrief will arrive in your email inbox every other Thursday.

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Scientists identify 500 new species of gut bacteria
New York Daily News
A team of Chinese and Danish researchers has identified 500 new species of gut-residing microorganisms and 800 new bacterial viruses which could attack them. The findings could lead to promising new treatments and possibly circumvent the current crisis of antimicrobial resistance. Using a technique they developed for analyzing DNA sequence data, researchers managed to more than double the number of intestinal bacteria species that has previously been identified.
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New oral cancer target could reveal disease's aggressiveness
Medical Daily
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis have developed a method for predicting oral cancer's future aggressiveness, a new study reports, possibly paving the way for better diagnostic tools to guide treatment plans. Unlike skin cancer, which generally offers clinicians easy and instant observation of any and all tumors, cancers that are embedded in the body's tissues don't always show up as clearly on scanners.
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FDA grants orphan drug status for congenital ichthyosis treatment
Dermatology Times
The Food and Drug Administration has granted orphan drug designation to Galderma's trifarotene molecule for the treatment of congenital ichthyosis. As a result, Galderma officials say the company plans to implement a clinical development plan to explore new treatment options for other rare skin diseases such as cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and Gorlin syndrome.
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Cancer therapy: Targeting in the field of metabolic rewiring
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Of more than 100,000 carcinogen point mutations, 350 are known to influence cancer phenotype. However, 30 years of intensive research on cancer biology and large amounts of grant money invested have translated into few novel treatments. This raises many questions regarding the true value of development of multiple potential new therapeutics just to prove they cannot provide effective treatment for cancer. Perhaps we have missed the point. Metabolic reprograming of cancer cells could be yet another key to a more effective treatment for cancer.
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Potential drug target for PTSD prevention
Science Daily
A drug that appears to make memories of fearsome events less durable in mice has been discovered by researchers. The finding may accelerate the development of treatments for preventing PTSD. The drug, called osanetant, targets a distinct group of brain cells in a region of the brain that controls the formation and consolidation of fear memories.
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Potential Alzheimer's drug prevents abnormal clots in the brain
Neuroscience News
New experiments in Sidney Strickland's Laboratory of Neurobiology and Genetics at Rockefeller University have identified a compound that might halt the progression of Alzheimer's by interfering with the role amyloid-β, a small protein that forms plaques in Alzheimer's brains, plays in the formation of blood clots. This work is highlighted in the July issue of Nature Reviews Drug Discovery.
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Findings may improve treatment of inflammatory breast cancer tumors
Medical Xpress
Researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute have identified a mechanism of breast cancer cells that leads to chemotherapy resistance in inflammatory breast cancer. These preclinical findings, published online ahead of print in the International Journal of Oncology, provide evidence for a potential therapeutic approach that will restore sensitivity to chemotherapy and improve treatment of inflammatory breast cancer tumors.
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Researchers use nanoparticles to enhance chemotherapy
R&D Magazine
University of Georgia researchers have developed a new formulation of cisplatin, a common chemotherapy drug, that significantly increases the drug's ability to target and destroy cancerous cells. Cisplatin may be used to treat a variety of cancers, but it is most commonly prescribed for cancer of the bladder, ovaries, cervix, testicles and lung. It is an effective drug, but many cancerous cells develop resistance to the treatment.
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You can now print 3-D blood vessels
Daily Caller
Need a new heart? Researchers have already been using 3-D printers to create human tissue. Now, scientists at the University of Sydney, collaborating with MIT, Harvard and Stanford, have figured out how to "bio-print" blood vessels with the hope of eventually making new, artificial organs. According to 3Dprint.com, researchers needed to figure out how to pump blood into the bio-printed human tissue before creating human organs for organ transplant patients.
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ICBS Discovery
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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