This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit                     November 26, 2014

ICBS Homepage                                                              Receive this from a colleague? Sign up to receive your own issue.




Scientific Business Intelligence Software

Capture, manage, analyze, and mine chemical data and information with advanced cheminformatics technology.

 

Welcome to the ICBS Discovery e-NewsBrief from the International Chemical Biology Society. This is a free, bi-weekly digest of headlines and news related to the chemical biology field. With a variety of stories selected from media outlets around the world, we hope you will find this publication informative. The e-NewsBrief will arrive in your email inbox every other Thursday.

The International Chemical Biology Society is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting research and educational opportunities at the interface of chemistry and biology. Join Today!



Archaea microbes may hold potential as new antibacterial drugs
Medical Daily
A family of microbes known as Archaea might hold potential as a new type of antibacterial drug. These bugs are known as "life's extremists" due to their remarkable ability to live in extreme temperatures, from boiling hydrothermal pools and deep sea vents, where no other organisms can survive. The researchers out of Vanderbilt University analyzed a gene that produces an enzyme found in tears, saliva, milk and mucus, known as a lysozyme. The lysozyme in the Archaea gene contains "broad-spectrum antibacterial action," the study found.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




The cancer breakthrough with big implications
TIME
Once you've been diagnosed with cancer, you're sent for a dizzying array of tests — but most of them are focused on you, as the living host of the tumors, and not on the malignant growths themselves. That may soon change, as researchers report in the journal Science. Some cancer centers already take biopsies of tumors and run them through genetic tests, to get a better sense of what's driving the cancer. That information can be helpful in deciding which of the growing number of targeted anti-cancer drugs will work best to stop those growths.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Researchers report way to target hard-to-hit site in disease pathway
Medical Xpress
Researchers have successfully targeted an important molecular pathway that fuels a variety of cancers and related developmental syndromes called "Rasopathies." Reporting their results Nov. 20 in Chemistry & Biology, scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center say they identified a class of lead compounds that successfully recognize a key target in the Ras signaling pathway.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Antibiotics during pregnancy, C-sections increase obesity risk in children
Science World Report
Recent findings published in the International Journal of Obesity have shown that antibiotic use during the second and third trimester can increase the risk of childhood obesity. Researchers at Columbia University observed 436 women throughout seven years. Findings revealed that 16 percent had taken antibiotics during the second and third trimesters, resulting an 84 percent increased obesity risk.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Why 'neglected diseases' are becoming a global danger
io9
Though over 1 billion people suffer from them, they're called "neglected diseases." That's because they attract little public attention and research money. But these diseases are about to explode across the globe, which is why many doctors say the neglect needs to stop now. The vast majority of NTDs are tropical, affecting mostly poor populations in rural sub-Saharan Africa. But it's a problem with global reach — one that's set to spread as climate change expands the range of tropical afflictions, and as our civilization becomes increasingly interconnected.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Miss an issue of ICBS Discovery? Click here to visit the archive page.


How do the mouse and human genomes compare?
Science Daily
Looking across the genomes of humans and mice, scientists have found that, in general, the systems that are used to control gene activity in both species have many similarities, along with crucial differences. The results may offer insights into gene regulation and other systems important to mammalian biology, and provide new information to determine when the mouse is an appropriate model to study human biology and disease. They may also help explain its limitations.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


In study of cell therapy for heart attack, more cells make a difference
Science Daily
Physicians from 60 sites treated 161 heart attack patients with their own bone marrow cells, selected for their healing potential and then reinjected into the heart, in an effort to improve the heart's recovery. Their conclusion? Patients who receive more cells get significant benefits.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Biochemists build largest synthetic molecular 'cage' ever
R&D Magazine
University of California, Los Angeles biochemists have created the largest-ever protein that self-assembles into a molecular "cage." The research could lead to synthetic vaccines that protect people from the flu, HIV and other diseases. At a size hundreds of times smaller than a human cell, it also could lead to new methods of delivering pharmaceuticals inside of cells, or to the creation of new nanoscale materials.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


2 drugs are no more effective than 1 to treat common kidney disease
National Institutes of Health
Using two drugs was no more effective than a single drug in slowing disease progression in people with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, according to two studies funded by the National Institutes of Health. One of the studies also showed that rigorous blood pressure treatment slowed growth of kidney cysts, a marker of ADPKD, but had little effect on kidney function compared to standard blood pressure treatment.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 



ICBS Discovery
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Caitlin Harrison, Content Editor, 469.420.2657  
Contribute news


Learn how to add us to your safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox.

This edition of the ICBS Discovery was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Sign up to receive your own bi-weekly copy.

Recent issues

Nov. 13, 2014
Oct. 30, 2014






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063