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Small plane, sputtering, gently merges onto New Jersey highway
New York Times
A small airplane was cruising about 3,500 feet over the northwest corner of New Jersey afternoon when its single engine sputtered out, rendering it powerless as it descended miles from a landing strip. Alone at the controls, Dr. Christopher O. Okechukwu struggled to restart the engine as he searched for a place to land. He managed to coax the motor briefly back to life a few times, he said, and pull the Cessna 150 plane a little higher to extend his glide path to the closest highway, Route 23.
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JetBlue flight nearly collides with small plane near New York airport
CBS News
The FAA is investigating a near-midair collision between two planes by an airport north of New York City. The FAA said in a statement that JetBlue Flight 94 had begun its descent into Westchester County Airport when its collision-warning system alerted pilots that a small plane was coming toward it. JetBlue says its pilots' quick reaction averted a collision.
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Avoiding turbulence
FLYING
Ben Franklin said it 240 years ago: "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." We'd all best apply that ounce of prevention shortly, because events are indicating 2015 will be a year of thunderstorms like we've never seen before. Throughout 2014 the clues were stacking up. In a normal year, only three or four incidents find pilots flying into the tops of thunderstorms and experiencing severe turbulence. Last year such events happened at only three- to four-week intervals.
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FROM I FLY AMERICA


IFA has partnered with Office Depot to bring members a FREE national discount program
I Fly America
Did you know that I Fly America members have exclusive access to significant savings at Office Depot? You can save up to 80 percent off on preferred products, deep discounts on other products, and receive free next-day delivery on online orders over $50! Visit this link to shop online or print your free Store Purchasing Card to take advantage of these great savings today!
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The right stuff — What kind of medical must I hold?
By James Williams, reprinted with permission by FAA Aviation News
You have probably seen or heard about the kind of "right stuff" physical perfection required of early astronauts and, for that matter, the earliest aviators obliged to obtain a medical certificate. In both cases, the standards were such that many of today's active airmen might have never passed the exam.

Fortunately, things are different now. The standards recognize that few of us are perfect physical specimens, and they also recognize that the level of certification required for personal recreational flying is different from that needed to command a large passenger airliner.

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IFA pilot quiz — Airport call letters
I Fly America
Airport call letters are often odd and have no relationship to the airport's name. Let's have some fun with them and see if the place can be identified by airport call letters alone. One answer to each question is a correct airport, while the others are phony.

1. You are hungry. Where will you stop to EAT?
    a. EAT Elmira, NY
    b. EAT Wenatche, WA
    c. EAT Erie, PA
2. You want a special dinner, so you land at what airport?
    a. CKV Chicken, AK
    b. DPC Deer Park, VT
    c. LTK Turkey Run, TN
Continue the quiz and find out the answers.

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Accident report — Failure to refuel airplane results in fuel exhaustion
I Fly America
The 2,800-hour private pilot of the single-engine airplane experienced a partial loss of engine power on takeoff. A witness, who is also an airframe and powerplant (A&P) mechanic with inspection authorization (IA), stated that he heard the engine sputtering until the airplane was approximately 250 feet above the ground (AGL); then the engine stopped running. The A&P added that the pilot almost completed a 180-degree turn in an attempt to return to the airport; however, the airplane impacted the ground about 60 feet short of the airport.
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Retired Air Force mechanic restores single-engined planes called 'Texans'
Appeal-Democrat
What started as admiration for his father's work has launched a lifelong passion for all things aviation for Yuba City, California, resident Roger Edwards. "Some of my earliest memories were working on planes with my father at Falcon Field in Mesa, Arizona," Edwards said. Edwards, 55, retired in 2003 from Beale Air Force Base as an aircraft mechanic and now restores T-6 airplanes — in his free time. Shortly after retiring, Edwards purchased an Auburn-based company that primarily sold T-6 parts called California Texans.
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Redhawk diesel selected by Cochise College
General Aviation News
RedHawk Aero, a subsidiary of Redbird Flight Simulations, reports that Cochise College in Douglas, Arizona, has ordered six RedHawk aircraft. Students enrolled in the upcoming fall semester will use the new RedHawk aircraft while training for Private Pilot, Instrument and Commercial Pilot Certification in Cochise College’s professional pilot program. "The selection of RedHawk aircraft for our training fleet, offers us flexibility and cost savings," said Belinda Burnett, director of aviation programs and Chief Flight Instructor for Cochise College.
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Last of the great flying boats
Air & Space Magazine
When I was a young kid obsessed with airplanes, my mom bought me a model of the Convair R3Y Tradewind flying boat. I still remember how the nose of my model hinged up just like the real thing. Despite this and other innovations, the Tradewind would prove to be the last in the company's long line of celebrated seaplanes. Derived from a scrubbed Navy patrol bomber, the Tradewind was an attractive airplane that would serve as a high-speed transport and aerial tanker for seaplanes based at remote locations.
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Oregon town welcomes new airport operator
Albany Democrat-Herald via Corvallis Gazette-Times
Tony Hann has been fascinated by aviation ever since seeing his first picture of a remote-controlled plane when he was a little boy in Korea. Hann didn't get to try a toy plane of his own until his family immigrated to the United States when he was nine. By then, the family was living near the Santa Monica Airport, and it was the bigger versions of the planes that began to capture his attention. The 41-year-old finally went for his own pilot's license about a decade ago and recently purchased a 1968 Piper Arrow from a pilot in New Jersey.
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Discovery Channel's 'How It's Made' wraps filming at Piper Aircraft
General Aviation News
The Discovery Channel's "How It's Made" documentary television series has completed filming at Piper Aircraft, wrapping up two detail-intensive days in the factory and supporting departments. The camera crew arrived on property at Piper early to begin working on the popular documentary series "How It's Made." Broadcast in 180 countries, the show offers a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the fabrication of various products, from everyday objects to industrial items and manufacturing marvels.
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Sporty's formally launches 172LITE trainer
FLYING
From the moment Sporty's revealed details of a barebones refurbished Cessna 172 trainer at Sporty's Academy in Batavia, Ohio, renting for $99 an hour including fuel, owners of other flight schools around the country took notice. In calls and emails they all had the same questions: Do you plan to sell similar refurbed airplanes and, if so, what's the price? As a result of the strong market interest, Sporty's has formally launched the 172LITE trainer, which it is offering to flight schools and flying clubs for a fraction of the cost of a new Cessna Skyhawk.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The flight trainer who flunked 9/11 hijackers (The San Diego Union-Tribune)
FAA meets Internet: Ruling on GA limits the sharing economy (San Jose Mercury News)
Accident Report — Failure to maintain airspeed results in... (I Fly America)
More than a pretty face (FLYING)
Carbon monoxide: A hidden killer (By Paul Engstrom, aviation writer and IFA member)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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