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Free small plane rides for girls in Maryland
The Washington Post
"It was really windy, so we couldn't go over the mountain," remembers Mariah Williams, 9, from Middletown, Md. "But I wasn't afraid. It was pretty.” That was last March, when Williams sat in the front seat of a Cessna 172, wearing a headset to muffle the noise in the small plane. She was chatting through the microphone with pilot Brittney Miculka, a 29-year-old flier who was telling Mariah how airplanes work and what pilots do. Miculka even let her take the steering wheel and fly the airplane.
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FAA: Airworthiness directive ban necessary for old Cessna twins
AVWeb
The FAA says an airworthiness directive banning most early Cessna twins — except 337s — from flight into known icing is necessary because too many pilots were ignoring a mandatory service bulletin issued by the company in 1997 that says the same thing. Cessna sent out the bulletin after it became clear that even a little ice on almost 7,000 of the twins could seriously affect the slow-speed handling, resulting in a lot of hard landings.
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Refurbishment starts at home
AINonline
Several completion and refurbishment centers are preparing infrastructure enhancements and consolidation to meet shifting demand for services. Spirit Aeronautics of Columbus, Ohio, is adding a 17,860-square-foot hangar to its Port Columbus International Airport campus to support the expansion of its refurbishment services.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    FAA issues new helicopter safety rules (FLYING)
Pennsylvania man uses own 'wings' for Angel Flight (Washington Observer Reporter)
Fewer pilots navigating the friendly skies (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette)
Gulfstream ships more than Cessna in business jet rebound (Reuters)

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FROM I FLY AMERICA


FLYING Magazine available to IFA members
I Fly America
Currently a complimentary member of IFA? You can now upgrade your membership for only $12 (20 percent discount off the normal membership rate) and increase your member benefits to include a one-year subscription to FLYING magazine — a $14 value! Learn more and upgrade your membership today!

Not already an IFA member? You can join today for only $15 and get your own FLYING Magazine subscription plus all of the other valuable and useful IFA benefits. (Offer available to U.S. residents only.) Learn more and join IFA!

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Breaking the Code
By Edsel W. Ford, Jr.
Reprinted with permission from FAA Aviation News
When does a group of parts or a machine that looks like an aircraft really become an aircraft? Is it when the last rivet is driven? No. Is it when the last piece of masking tape is removed? No. Then it has to be when it is issued an airworthiness certificate — that has to be when it becomes an aircraft. No again. So, when does it become an aircraft?

The machine becomes an aircraft at the time of registration with the Federal Aviation Administration's Registration Branch, AFS-750, in Oklahoma City. AFS-750 will assign a registration number (N-number) and a manufacturer's code. Now the FAA recognizes the machine as an aircraft no matter how complete. This is when it becomes an aircraft.

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IFA pilot quiz — 1st, biggest, best
I Fly America
Aviation has many firsts, biggest, and bests. How many of these can you answer?

1. What is the altitude record for gas balloons?
    a. 28,412 meters
    b. 31,682 meters
    c. 34,668 meters
2. What is the record for distance flown by a helicopter without landing?
    a. 854.82 kilometers
    b. 1,412.4 kilometers
    c. 3,561.55 kilometers
Continue the quiz and find out the answers.

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IFA pilot quiz — Aviation 1sts
I Fly America
We always remember our first flight, our first solo, our first passenger. What other firsts do you remember in aviation? Caution: this one is not easy. Continue the quiz and find out the answers.

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Florida airport approach becomes emergency as bird strikes aircraft
Fort Myers News-Press
About 10 miles out from Page Field airport in Fort Myers, Fla., pilot Robert Weber had his 1986 Piper Saratoga on autopilot and was enjoying the calm afternoon flight. In an instant...

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World's '1st airport' largely unknown
CNN
According to author Thom Patterson: An old wooden shack and rows of tilted fence posts — In a way, this deserted little patch of Midwestern dirt was the starting point for every airport in the world. On a cold winter's...

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IN THE NEWS


A new option for general aviation sellers and buyers
AVWeb
Pilots who have a used airplane to sell — or who are looking for one to buy — have a new website where they can post their airplane for sale or shop online. The site, BiddingAce.com plans to offer the airplanes up for bid, and will actively help facilitate the sales, said A.J. Brown, vice president for marketing. "Most people buy maybe one or two airplanes in a lifetime," Brown said. "We'll be buying and selling thousands, so our knowledge base will be much greater to help these people."
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Hartzell composite 5-blade prop okayed on TBMs
FLYING
Propeller maker Hartzell has gotten the FAA's approval for a new five-blade composite prop for existing Socata TBMs, from the 700 though the 850 series. We flew the new prop on a TBM 700 recently and were impressed by its smooth operation, great runway performance and impressive climb rates.
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Controllers guide small plane pilot through Texas storm
KWTX-TV
The pilot of a small plane was able to make a safe landing after air traffic controllers guided him through a severe storm to Texas' Austin-Bergstrom International Airport. The Federal Aviation Administration said the controllers' quick thinking helped the pilot through a dangerous situation as thunderstorms and high winds hit much of the state.
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Prepping for your instrument proficiency check
AVWeb
There was a time, before the most recent revisions to FAR 61, when an instrument proficiency check — previously known as an instrument competency check — wasn't structured. That's no longer the case. "The instrument proficiency check must consist of the areas of operation and instrument tasks required in the instrument rating practical test standards," so sayeth FAR 61.57. Essentially, you're taking what could turn out to be another instrument rating checkride. How will you prepare?
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Pipistrel switches engines for Panthera
AVWeb
Pipistrel's sleek Panthera retractable, announced two years ago, will soon have a six-cylinder Lycoming IO-540 rather than the IO-390 originally planned. The engine switch was forced because Lycoming won't be approving the IO-390 for mogas, according to Pipistrel. The IO-540 replacement, which Pipistrel says will improve short-field and high density altitude takeoff performance, will be approved for mogas use.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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