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Sequestration and aviation: Tower closures just the beginning
Aviation International News
The FAA lowered the boom on airports serving mainly GA, business and regional airline traffic, announcing on March 22 that it will close 149 ATC contract towers as part of its effort to slash spending by more than $600 million in the current fiscal year under the federal government's "sequester" mandate. The action could spell the end of the agency's 30-year-old contract tower program. Part 91 and other operators will have to adjust the way they fly to newly non-towered fields or consider flying to airports that do have towers.
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See related story: Lawsuits over tower closures (AVweb)




Engine failure on takeoff kills 2
General Aviation News
The pilot of a Lancair 360 took off from a runway in Chesapeake, Va. According to witnesses on the ground, the airplane took off and was beyond the departure end of the runway at an altitude of about 200 to 300 feet when the engine began sputtering and backfiring. The plane turned sharply back toward the runway, stalled and spun. It began to recover and there was a brief restoration of engine power before impact.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: NTSB.


California teen who aimed laser at aircraft gets prison term
Los Angeles Times
A North Hollywood, Calif., teenager was sentenced to 30 months in federal prison for aiming a blinding laser beam at a private jet and a police helicopter last year. U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson imposed the penalty on Adam Gardenhire, 19, who pleaded guilty in October to one felony count of aiming a laser beam at an aircraft. The case is the second prosecution of its kind in the country since the laser law was signed by President Barack Obama in 2012.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    FAA to close 149 air traffic towers (Aviation Today)
50,000 US airplanes disappear (Flying Magazine)
IFA pilot's quiz: Aviation safety (I Fly America)
Whitehead '1st flight' claims stir critical backlash (AVweb)
Controller praised for saving hypoxic pilot (Aviation International News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Call for contributors
MultiBriefs
In an effort to enhance the overall content of Field Reports, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of IFA, your knowledge of general aviation lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit and our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics and possible payment to the author for submission.
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FROM I FLY AMERICA


Hobie Sunglasses discount available
I Fly America
I Fly America members receive a 50 percent discount off retail prices on a wide range of Hobie Sunglasses. You can count on Hobie for top-quality sunglasses that can be worn year-round. This discount can only be accessed through IFA's website. Check out the great styles and shop now!

Not an IFA member? Join today!

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Finding the right college to study aviation
FAA Safety Briefing via I Fly America
Where do you start if you are looking for the right college to study aviation? It's not like real estate with its famous maxim "location, location, location." Location might figure into your thinking, but there are other important factors, such as course of study, cost and, importantly, accreditation. "A good starting point," says James Brough, FAA National Aviation and Space Education Program manager, "is to visit the Aviation Accreditation Board International website and check out its list of accredited aviation programs."
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IFA pilot quiz: Fun things to know
I Fly America
Some things about flying are just fun to know, while others are necessary when taking biennial flight reviews or other tests. On your next biennial, throw some of these questions at your instructor.

1. What is the origin of the term "dead reckoning?"
  1. Straight navigation, so the compass is "dead"
  2. Deduced reckoning
  3. From term "Direction Estimates and Distance"
2. Cal Rogers was the first person to fly an airplane coast to coast. For what other first is he known?
  1. First to use a parachute
  2. First to fly a float plane
  3. First to die from bird strike
Continue the quiz and find out the answers.

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Join IFA on Facebook
I Fly America
Access IFA through Facebook. You will be able to read the latest news from IFA, network with other IFA members and connect with fellow aviators by sharing your favorite aviation photos and flying destinations.

If you're not already using Facebook, it's easy to set up your own free account. And once you're on Facebook, and accessing the IFA page, you can easily invite your friends to join you as well. Visit us on Facebook and make sure to "Like" us today!

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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Pilot ejected when small airplane dove
NBC News
The body of a student pilot who was ejected from a small aircraft above an area east of Chattanooga, Tenn., in a freak accident has been found. The accident occurred when the owner of the Zodiac 601XL plane was taking lessons from an instructor. A malfunction caused the plane to nose dive and the canopy flew open at about 2,500 feet. Neither man was wearing a seat belt.

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Whitehead '1st flight' claims stir critical backlash
AVweb
Critics that include the National Aviation Heritage Alliance and a senior curator for the Smithsonian Institution have refuted claims made this month and supported by Jane's All the World's Aircraft that Gustav Whitehead piloted a powered aircraft years before the Wright Brothers. The claim specifically stated that Whitehead first flew his original powered monoplane by at least 1901.

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Texas airport looks to become seaplane haven
General Aviation News
Joey Baker says he never met a pilot who didn't want a seaplane rating. Working off that premise, he's hoping that Sulphur Springs Municipal Airport in Texas will become a destination for seaplane pilots across the United States.

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IN THE NEWS


10 years later: The nighttime raid that destroyed Chicago's Meigs Field
Chicago Sun-Times
Ten years ago, then-mayor of Chicago Richard M. Daley sent in bulldozers under cover of darkness to carve giant Xs into Meigs Field's only runway. This action rendering the runway unusable to the private pilots and corporate CEOs who coveted their access to downtown Chicago.
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Home-built aircraft causing concern
The Asbury Park Press
Experimental planes, according to the Federal Aviation Administration and the Experimental Aircraft Association, often are standard aircraft. But they are often built at home rather than on an FAA-certified assembly line. According to the National Transportation Safety Board, which conducted an in-depth study last year, such aircraft make up almost 10 percent of all general aviation. But the experimentals also accounted for about 15 percent of the accidents and 21 percent of fatalities in 2011.
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Texas takes over tower funding
AVweb
Texas will take over funding of air traffic control towers at 13 airports that will lose them to the federal government's sequester cuts. The state's department of transportation made the decision March 28 but it won't become official until the Texas Transportation Commission ratifies it. "Safety is the primary reason we felt a need to take immediate action for the air travelers and business aircraft that use these airports," Texas Transportation Commissioner Fred Underwood said in a news release.
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Getting GA's message to lawmakers
General Aviation News
When lobbyists want Congressional help on issues, they usually seek out members with interests in that issue in a caucus. The informal, bipartisan groups are found in both the House and Senate. But until recently, there were no general aviation caucuses. Now there are active groups in both Houses. In the four years since the Congressional general aviation caucuses were formed, they have become an effective way to gain recognition and acceptance for general aviation.
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Solar Impulse's tour destinations announced for multiple US cities
The Huffington Post
A solar-powered plane that has wowed aviation fans in Europe is set to travel across the United States with stops in Phoenix, Dallas, Washington, D.C., and New York, organizers of the trip announced. The plane, Solar Impulse, is expected to be ready to leave from NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif., on May 1.
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App has over 450 questions geared to instrument and CFII certificates
Aero News Network
The second in a series of apps from ASA is a new Instrument Pilot Checkride app based on the popular Instrument Oral Exam Guide book by Michael Hayes. Designed for pilots training for the Instrument Rating or the Instrument Flight Instructor (CFII) certificate, this app lists the questions most likely to be asked by examiners during the last step in the pilot certification process — the Practical Exam — and provides succinct, ready responses.
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