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Unfit for publication: How USA TODAY got everything wrong
The Huffington Post
According to author Jeff Schweitzer: USA TODAY splashed across its front page the breathless headline, "Unfit for Flight" to dramatize the deadly enterprise of flying general aviation aircraft. We learn in bold print there have been 45,000 deaths attributed to small aircraft and dozens of multimillion-dollar verdicts that reveal lies and coverups. There is only one problem: Nearly every inference about aviation in the article is wrong. Let's put this in perspective statistically. If a private pilot flew 10 hours per week, 52 weeks per year, for 30 years, it would take over five lifetimes to be involved in a fatal accident.

Related story: GAMA responds to sensationalistic USA TODAY story on general aviation safety
(Aviation Pros)
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'Flying's always been in the blood,' F-16 pilot carries on family legacy
DVIDS
Before he could walk or talk, before he knew or understood the breadth of his family’s military service, Dustin Carey was drawn to airplanes. Countless hours of his childhood were spent planted in front of a television, raptly watching the winged machines defy gravity as they engaged in dogfights and historic aerial battles. Bombers, fighters, reconnaissance aircraft — the capabilities of each one kept him mesmerized.
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Kansas museum opening up its planes ' story evokes strong response
AVweb
In an action almost unprecedented among air museums, the Kansas Aviation Museum will be allowing visitors to get inside eight of its historic airplanes. At the fourth annual "Play on a Plane Day," those who come to the museum in Wichita, Kansas, will be able to get inside a KC-135 Stratotanker — which Boeing originally called the 717 — T-33, F-84, Learjet 23, Boeing 727 and 737 and a Beech Queen Air. While some museums have special events that allow visitors to "cross the ropes" and get close to airplanes on display, almost none open up their airplanes and allow the public inside.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Pennsylvania dads attend historic Aviation Days at York Airport (York Dispatch)
Prince William shouldn't scratch his piloting itch (By Mark Huber)
My 1st general aviation flight (By Steven Paduchak AirlineReporter guest reporter)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FROM I FLY AMERICA


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Defeating dehydration
By Frederick E. Tilton, M.D., FAA federal air surgeon
Reprinted with permission from FAA Safety Briefing
Summer is prime time for flying. It is also a prime time for dehydration, given the combination of higher ambient temperatures, higher humidity and warm winds. Certain beverages, e.g., coffee, tea and soft drinks, can further increase the risk of dehydration. Since dehydration can produce headache, fatigue, cramps, sleepiness and dizziness, it can put pilots at increased risk for incidents and accidents.

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Get the card every aviator needs
I Fly America
Announcing the I Fly America® American Express® Card issued by First Bankcard®, a division of First National Bank of Omaha. IFA is always on the watch for programs and services that will benefit its members and we are excited to tell you about a new partnership we have with First Bankcard® and American Express® to create the I Fly America Card, specifically with you in mind.
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IFA pilot quiz — IFA FLY-Q test
I Fly America
You probably have taken I-Q tests. Now, just for fun take this I Fly America FLY-Q test. 1. Eric Weiss was the first American to fly a plane in Australia. Weiss was better known as:
    a. Elmer Gantry
    b. Harry Houdinia
    c. Al Jolson
2. How many planes did women pilots in the Air Transport Auxiliary during WWII deliver from factories to line squadrons?
    a. 2,486
    b. 96,806
    c. 308,567
Continue the quiz and find out the answers.

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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Unfit for publication: How USA TODAY got everything wrong
The Huffington Post
According to author Jeff Schweitzer: USA TODAY splashed across its front page the breathless headline, "Unfit for Flight" to dramatize the deadly enterprise of flying general...

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read more
Cool-headed pilot had never jumped before day his plane crashed
The Huffington Post
Pilot Shawn Kinmartin spent his days flying people who elect to jump out of an airplane, but he'd never taken the plunge himself. That all changed on the day his plane went down. Kinmartin...

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Why do smart people do dumb things? — The art of managing mistakes
By Guy Minor
Have you ever noticed how we sometimes take a perverse pleasure in reading articles that detail aircraft accidents? That's not terribly surprising; after all, an accident account is a...

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IN THE NEWS


Study: Aviation cluster must innovate, globalize, train
Aviation Pros
If Wichita, Kansas, is to remain a key aviation cluster for years to come, it must continue to innovate, globalize, and train and keep talent. Those are the same issues facing the United States aviation industry if it is to maintain its global leadership, according to a study by PricewaterhouseCoopers, or PwC. Wichita is one of four major successful aviation clusters in the U.S., along with Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas, the Seattle and Everett, Washington, area and Connecticut, according to the study — called "Aviation's second golden age: Can the U.S. aircraft industry maintain leadership?" Clusters are emerging in South Carolina, Oklahoma and Ohio.
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Cirrus Fractional expands services
FLYING
A fractional ownership firm out of Atlanta, which currently offers six Cirrus SR22 GTS airplanes to its owners, has announced it is opening up a second location in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The expansion will happen in August, the company said, but customers have already signed up at the new location, which will offer two Cirrus airplanes to start.
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Widow of B-24 pilot takes ride to experience 'quirky' airplane
Akron Beacon Journal
Frances Rohrich got the chance of a lifetime when she and her daughter, Janis Seward, took a ride in the World War II-era B-24 Liberator plane that spent most of its time recently at Akron Fulton International Airport. Rohrich's husband, Eugene, piloted the same planes in the Pacific Theater, and although the B-24 was designed to serve as a bomber, his particular plane was responsible for taking aerial photos of the terrain. "He didn't talk about his missions ever," Seward said. "However, he did talk about flying that plane and how fascinating he found it, how hard it was to fly and how cramped he found it."
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