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Pilot uses stool to make improvised landing on aircraft carrier
WXIN-TV
A pilot made an incredible landing after his landing gear malfunctioned. The Marine Corps released video of the impressive feat, which happened on the deck of the USS Bataan. The pilot, Capt. William Mahoney, said the landing gear on his AV-8B Harrier malfunctioned, leaving him no choice but to improvise. A colleague in the tower suggested that Mahoney put the plane's nose down on the stool. The pilot couldn't see the stool as he descended, but made it work.
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Pilot of small plane makes emergency landing in Texas
KXAS-TV
The pilot of a single-engine plane made an emergency landing in Arlington, Texas, and came to rest on a highway ramp. The pilot brought the plane down in a grassy area alongside Interstate 20, but was unable to bring the plane to a stop before running onto the highway ramp going from U.S. Highway 287 northbound to westbound I-20. The plane was towing a GEICO banner near the interchange when the pilot told air traffic controllers that the plane lost oil pressure, the FAA said.
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Women take flight
The Daily Progress
When Meagan Maynard turned right out of Hollymead in Charlottesville, Virginia, with her daughters and niece in tow, the girls thought they were going to run errands. Ten minutes later, they were on the tarmac at Landmark Aviation, face to face with a line of airplanes gassed up and ready for free flights. There was only one condition: no boys allowed.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Unfit for publication: How USA TODAY got everything wrong (The Huffington Post)
Defeating dehydration (By Frederick E. Tilton, M.D., FAA federal air surgeon)
Kansas museum opening up its planes ' story evokes strong response (AVweb)

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Colors of the rainbow
By Frederick E. Tilton, M.D.; Federal Air Surgeon
Reprinted with permission from FAA Safety Briefing
Most of us take vision — including our ability to see colors — for granted. As you might remember from ground school, the retina holds two kinds of photoreceptor cells: rods and cones. The rods are highly sensitive to light so they help a person see in dim light situations but they cannot differentiate between colors. Three types of cones — red, blue, and green — provide the ability to perceive color.

The condition commonly called "color blindness," more accurately known as color vision deficiency, is usually an inherited condition caused by a defect in one or more of the cones, and it occurs more commonly in males. However, some pathological conditions can also affect a person's ability to see color.

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IFA pilot quiz — Legal and safety measures
I Fly America
Whether flying regularly or getting back in the air after an extended period, it is smart to bone up on essential legal and safety measures. These questions will test your memory and perhaps suggest some refresher study.

1. Hypoxia usually does not occur in a normally healthy person below what altitude?
    a. 15,000 feet
    b. 12,000 feet
    c. 9,000 feet
2. The FAA defines a near mid-air collision as when two or more aircraft come closer than what distance?
    a. One-half mile
    b. 500 feet
    c. One mile
Continue the quiz and find out the answers.

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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Pilot uses stool to make improvised landing on aircraft carrier
WXIN-TV
A pilot made an incredible landing after his landing gear malfunctioned. The Marine Corps released video of the impressive feat, which happened on the deck of the USS Bataan. The pilot...

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Unfit for publication: How USA TODAY got everything wrong
The Huffington Post
According to author Jeff Schweitzer: USA TODAY splashed across its front page the breathless headline, "Unfit for Flight" to dramatize the deadly enterprise of flying general...

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'Flying's always been in the blood,' F-16 pilot carries on family legacy
DVIDS
Before he could walk or talk, before he knew or understood the breadth of his family’s military service, Dustin Carey was drawn to airplanes. Countless hours of his childhood were spent...

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IN THE NEWS


T&M Aviation and West Coast Wings mechanics repairing airplanes
Ukiah Daily Journal News
Only the tail end of a Cessna 208 Caravan is visible outside the shed doors of T&M Aviation. It is a small plane operated by UPS for overnight packages, and it is in the shop for a regular inspection, every six months, every 200 flight-hours. It flew in from Oakland in the morning, and owner Mike Whetzel and employees will have it serviced and ready to be flown out soon. The front end of the plane is open, from the engine fire wall forward, and the mechanics are performing an oil analysis and a soap sample, checking the chip detectors, cleaning the filter, checking the propeller, fuel filters and engine igniters and changing the aileron trim actuator under the right wing tip.
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Air BP debuts unleaded Avgas in conjunction with Goodwood Aerodrome
Aviation Pros
Leading international aviation fuel supplier, Air BP, in conjunction with Goodwood Aerodrome has announced it has successfully started trials supplying unleaded Avgas (91UL) for customers flying general aviation light aircraft into Goodwood Aerodrome in West Sussex, United Kingdom. The debut coincides with what will be a busy weekend of general aviation flying with the Goodwood Festival of Speed set to welcome some 1,200 movements. In its trial launch of its 91UL fuel grade, Air BP has emphasized the importance of the customer having a full infrastructure in place for acceptance of an additional grade of aviation fuel.
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Glider pilot aims for record high
Greenville News
With a slice of daytime moon above him and a red-tailed hawk keeping him company at a respectful distance, Gary Davis was in his element. Davis took his single-seat, battery-powered electric aircraft higher and higher into the blue sky above Greenville Downtown Airport in Greenville, South Carolina. The goal, as he circled and tried to catch thermal currents to support his 250-pound piece of modern aeronautical engineering, was to set a world altitude record for a particular class of aircraft.
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Planes, trains and automobiles
WCBU-Radio
The summer travel season is in full swing. Festivals in Macomb and Galesburg, Illinois, showcased planes, trains and automobiles. Buckle up for the ride. About a dozen single-engine airplanes landed and took off at the Macomb Airport for the city's Heritage's Days' Fly-in. The RV-7 kit plane took Jeff Diewold of Burlington six years to build. Diewold said there's nothing that compares to flying. "There's a reason the movies always show aerial views," Diewold said. "It's beautiful."
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